Baby Acne

Baby acne is a very common problem for newborns and young infants. While baby acne doesn’t really cause any issues for your baby, it can be unattractive. The good news is that baby acne usually will clear up on it’s own in a matter of weeks. Your baby may have episodes of baby acne off and on until he is around six months old, but it usually does not require any treatment.

Newborns may develop what is known as millia. Millia are little tiny white bumps that appear on a newborn’s cheeks, forehead, nose or chin. Some babies are born with millia. Millia, like baby acne, is nothing to worry about and it usually goes away on its own within the first three or four weeks after birth.

 

What does baby acne look like?

Baby acne looks similar to adult acne. If your baby has little pimples that look like whiteheads this may be millia or baby acne. Baby acne can also look like little red or fleshy pimples on your baby’s skin.

What causes baby acne?

We are not completely sure what causes baby acne, but researchers believe that it may be related to hormonal changes that take place at the end of pregnancy. Before a woman gives birth, her body releases hormones that help stimulate the oil glands in your baby’s skin. This stimulation may increase the oils in your baby’s skin resulting in acne.

What can you do to treat baby acne?

There really isn’t a lot you can do to make baby acne go away. What you can do is keep the skin clean by washing your baby’s face with a mild baby soap and water. Do not use oils or lotions on your baby’s face as this can irritate his skin and make things worse.

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