Colic – Does Your Baby Have it? What Can You Do About It? - Page 2

By Elizabeth Pantley, author of Gentle Baby Care and The No-Cry Sleep Solution

  • Know that your baby will cry during his colicky time, and while you can do things to make your baby more comfortable, nothing you can do will totally stop the crying. This is not a result of anything you’ve done or not done.
  • Plan outings for the times of day when baby is usually happy, or if outings keep your baby happy, plan them for the colicky times.
  • Take advantage of another person’s offer to take a turn with the baby, even if it’s just so that you can take a quiet bath or shower.
  • Keep reminding yourself that this is only temporary; it will pass.
  • Avoid keeping a long to-do list right now; only do what’s most important.
  • Talk to other parents of colicky babies so you can share ideas and comfort each other.
  • If the crying is getting to you and making you tense or angry, put your baby in his crib, or give him to someone else to hold for a while so that you don’t accidentally shake or harm your baby. (Shaking a baby can cause permanent brain damage, so if you feel angry, and colic can do that to you, put your baby down.)
  • Know that babies do not suffer long-term harm from having colic.

When should I call the doctor?

  • Anytime you are concerned about your baby, call your doctor. That goes for anything concerning your precious little one. In the case of colic, be sure to make that call if you notice any of the following:
  • Your baby’s crying is accompanied by vomiting.
  • Your baby is not gaining weight.
  • The colicky behavior lasts longer than four months.
  • Your baby seems to be in pain.
  • Your baby has a fever.
  • Your baby doesn’t want to be held or handled.
  • The crying spree isn’t limited to one bout in the evening.
  • Your baby does not have regular bowel movements or wet diapers.
  • You notice other problems that don’t appear on the previous list of symptoms.
  • Your baby’s crying is making you angry or depressed.

This article is an excerpt from Gentle Baby Care by Elizabeth Pantley. (McGraw-Hill, 2003)

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3 comments

By Sehrish Naseem on 01/06/16 at 1:03 am

I have used baby magic tea to treat colic in my two kids. The little one is still breastfeeding and had extreme colic than the elder one, but the tea re  ...

By mommy2boys76 on 03/15/11 at 12:36 pm

This is a helpful article. I have found that loud "shushing" immediately helps calm a fussy newborn. It is the sound they are used to hearing from day  ...

By GreenandHealthy on 07/11/10 at 12:24 pm

My family and I are huge fans of Dr. Karp (www.happiestbaby.com)! His techniques  ...

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