Family Health

From the Message Boards

JM Polls and Challenges

We love 3 names, but only having one baby....

Trying to decide on a girls name. We love all three names. Teagan, Riley and Samantha. So our choice...

Birth Control

Diaphragms - Caya or others.

Hi everyone! I am switching birth control from a hormonal method to a barrier method. I just bought...

The Mommy Lounge

Mothers' Feelings and Experiences During/After Pregnancy and Birth

Please fill out this survey regarding mothers' feelings & experiences during/after pregnancy and bir...

Siggies R Us

first siggy request

Can i have pink and Purples Can it say Mummy Beautiful Daughter...

Mommy Weightloss and Fitness

Alternatives if you are tired of going to the gym

Hi everyone, I've gone through a weight loss period when I was a teenager, and rock climbing helped...

» Check out the friendliest message board for moms and moms-to-be!

Cleft Palate

By JustMommies

In the early stages of fetal development, the tissues on the left and right sides of the lip and palate fuse together. The two lines below the nose and above the lip are from normal fusion. These lines are also referred to as ‘cupids bow.’ In a child born with cleft lip or palate-the normal fusion of tissues did not take place. The lips and the palate sections develop separately. A child can have cleft lip and not cleft palate or variations of both.
» Read more

Bedwetting Basics

Bedwetting is a cause of frustration for many parents. If you are like me, you may have gone through countless articles looking for the magic cure to your child's bedwetting problem. Unfortunately, there is no quick fix for bedwetting. Bedwetting in children under five is considered normal.
» Read more

Acne: Information and Skin Care Basics

By JustMommies

No one is immune to acne. We’ve all experienced it at least one time in our lives. Rich and poor, famous and infamous alike-acne knows no prejudice. For one reason or another, pores sometimes become blocked. Natural oils, sweat and dirt become trapped in the pore and acne occurs.
» Read more

Yeast Infection

By JustMommies

A yeast infection, also known as Candidiasis, is caused by the organism Candida albicans. Candida is normally present in the body, and only becomes a problem when there is an overgrowth. Antibiotic use is know to cause yeast infections.
» Read more

I Wanna Go Home: When Your Child is in the Hospital

By JustMommies

By Laura Nathanson, M.D., FAAP,
» Read more

What is Impetigo

By JustMommies

Impetigo is a highly contagious bacterial skin infection. It happens to be the most common skin infection among children. Impetigo is spread by skin to skin contact or even coming in contact with an object that has been contaminated. Two types of bacteria are responsible for this infection, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus.
» Read more

Warts

By JustMommies

If you haven’t personally experienced warts, chances are, you know someone who has. Warts are very common and extremely contagious. Although they are mostly nothing more than an annoyance, they generally cause little to no pain and are virtually harmless. There are dozens of old wives tales, rumors, folklore and myths that surround warts. The stories even include “exotic” remedies to cure them.
» Read more

Urinary Tract Infections

By JustMommies

Urinary tract infections are a common health care problem for women. Women are at greater risk for getting a urinary tract infection than men due to women's shorter urethra. This makes it easier for bacteria to spread into the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections are caused by bacteria, such as escheria coli (E-coli), entering the uretrha and spreading up the urinary tract.
» Read more

Swimmer’s Ear

Swimmer’s ear (the clinical term is otitis externa or acute external otitis) is a painful, inflamed infection of the ear canal that generally extends visibly to the outer portion of the ear.
» Read more

Rotavirus: The Facts

By JustMommies

If you’ve had a child recently, you may have noticed a new addition to your baby’s vaccine schedule. On January 1st, 2007, The American Academy of Pediatrics published a revised recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents. One major change to the schedule was the addition of the live oral Rotavirus vaccine. It is recommended to be given at 2, 4 and 6 months of age.
» Read more