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  #1  
October 16th, 2006, 08:42 AM
mrobinson
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I don't know if there is a better place to chat about this so I posted it here.

Beck12 has convinced me to personally have a miscarriage at home because of the possible issues associated with the procedures of D&C's. However, I'm 100% positive that would be against my doctor's orders. (Also, I don't want to miscarry in the hospital closest to me ~ two very public miscarriages in the emergency room.) If I died from too much blood loss at home, then I see it as my responsiblity. That's why I totally respect why women get the procedure done under the doctor's care..

Outside of actual abortions or third world nations, legal or illegal, does anyone know if women die from not having a D&C done by a doctor?
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  #3  
October 16th, 2006, 08:50 AM
mrobinson
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Quote:
Like die from a miscarriage, from not getting the D&C?
Also, hemorrhaging (which my mother went through), can become a complication of a natural miscarriage. If she didn't have the procedure done, then yes, she could have died.[/b]
This is exactly what I'm speaking of.

Hemorrhaging is the key.. What is a "normal" amount of blood loss? What are the stats on natural miscarriage deaths?

Quote:
I *personally* will agree with Beckie....never again will I get a D&C done.[/b]
I have to get Beck over here..

To anyone: What is worse emotionally ~ the D&C or natural? Wouldn't a natural miscarriage be more painful and more likely to have complications? (As I'm truly ignorant on stats, I really don't know the answers. I hate asking too..)
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  #4  
October 16th, 2006, 08:56 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2006
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I don't know what it's like to have a D&C as I had all natural miscarriages. I begged my drs for a D&C with my 2nd because I bled for almost 3 months. I still didn't get one though. I was lucky that with my 3rd I was in the hospital when I lost my son because I had major hemmorhaging (sp?) and I almost didn't make it (according to my dr). If I was ever to have another miscarriage, I would want a D&C because of my history with the others.

I haven't actually heard of anyone that has died from not getting a D&C, but I'm sure there may have been a few cases. I think the main things to worry about are infection and hemmorhaging, but if your dr. keeps a close eye on you, then natural would be fine.

Quote:
To anyone: What is worse emotionally ~ the D&C or natural? Wouldn't a natural miscarriage be more painful and more likely to have complications? (As I'm truly ignorant on stats, I really don't know the answers. I hate asking too..)[/b]
Like I said before, I never had a D&C, but to me IMO, natural is harder. I had severe cramps, large clots, lots of blood loss, and just feeling that pain for that long made it harder for me to deal with the miscarriage. It was like a constant reminder to me. I know someone that had a natural and a D&C and they said going with the D&C was much better because you didn't have all the bleeding, cramps, and all that comes along with natural. I'm sure either way, there are risks of complications, but you would think natural would carry a higher risk.
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  #6  
October 16th, 2006, 09:03 AM
mrobinson
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sending pm
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  #7  
October 16th, 2006, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE
Quote:
Hemorrhaging is the key.. What is a "normal" amount of blood loss? What are the stats on natural miscarriage deaths?[/b]
Well, most doctors will say that if you are bleeding and soaking more than one pad in an hour, then you need to go to the E.R. ASAP....but I have bled that way after my D&C, with clots the size of lemons (which is also another indicator of something going wrong), and the nurses there told me that it is completely normal in some woman... So, I dunno....

I will try to find some stats on it.


[/b][/quote]

Yes, I was told the same thing about one pad an hour. With my 2nd mc, I soaked way more than that. Everytime I would just stand I would gush all over the place. I had clots the size of my fist. I called my dr. and he told me it was "all in my head" I told him I'd save everything and bring it to him so he could see. I went into the ER and it turned out that I had a piece of placenta still stuck. Once that passed, I was ok. They said I was lucky I didn'thave an infection.
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  #8  
October 16th, 2006, 09:09 AM
mrobinson
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Quote:
I called my dr. and he told me it was "all in my head"[/b]
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  #9  
October 16th, 2006, 09:11 AM
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CeCe, I just want to say I'm so sorry you had to deal with your loss as well. We both have different experiences with the end results (d&c vs. natural) but I think no matter which way you go, it's still hard to deal with it and it takes time. Sounds like as horrible as your d&c experience was, I may be lucky I never got one.

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  #11  
October 16th, 2006, 11:53 AM
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I had also had a D&C and had complications. 2 days after I had excessive bleeding and was basically gushing blood everywhere (sorry if TMI) and they had to rush me to the ER and perform another one...which was awful basically like living the nightmare all over again Sorry if that is scary sounding but it was just a horrible experience and I would never want to see you go through that. I would go with Beckie on this one...
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  #12  
October 16th, 2006, 12:03 PM
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Although this information is nearly eight years old and coming from just a group of moms I knew and not a doctor persay, when I was living in Denmark I was told that doctors usually recommend having it at home. I am not too sure how much stock you can put in this because, like I said, it was exactly a medical opinion, jsut me being told what people there saw as the common advice for a woman in this situation.
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  #14  
October 16th, 2006, 01:01 PM
chlodoll
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I think some women cannot emotionally handle miscarrying at home. They want to get it done and over with which I can understand. I would personally opt for home myself.
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  #15  
October 16th, 2006, 01:06 PM
mrobinson
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From the second one:
Reasons to have a D&C


Speeding up the process of the miscarriage: Waiting to miscarry is a horrible emotional experience to go through. You will know that your baby is still in your womb but that there's no hope for a birth. It can be hours or weeks after you get the bad news before you start to bleed. There's no way to know. In the meantime, you find yourself having to wait out time that you should have been joyously thinking of your baby's development...waiting to "pass" your baby instead.

Your doctor can perform genetic testing on the baby: If it's your first loss, your doctor may not offer this as an option, but you should definitely ask about it if you've miscarried once or more in the past. Many doctors have a tendency to assume that all miscarriages are caused by genetic abnormalities, but estimates suggest that 40% of miscarriages are not. If you have the baby tested for genetic anomalies, you'll know whether that was the cause or not, and if it wasn't, you can request additional tests.

You won't have to see what comes out: Usually, you can be put under general anesthesia for a D&C and won't have to witness anything the doctor takes out of you. If you wait for a natural miscarriage and were past six or seven weeks, there's a chance you might see what remains of your baby come out...and that can be a traumatic experience in itself.

Less physical pain: A natural miscarriage can be painful. In most cases, it won't be, but it can come with severe cramping. After a d&c, your physical pain will be minimal.



Reasons NOT to have a D&C




The procecure is invasive: You have to check into the hospital for a D&C, and while you probably won't have to stay overnight, the process of doing this can be stressful and you will likely experience some strong emotions before and after the operation.

The procedure is unpleasant: A D&C is the same medical procedure that is used in an elective abortion. This can have psychological consequences for some women. Obviously a D&C should not be considered in the same league as an elective abortion given that the two serve entirely different medical purposes, but the ordeal can be traumatic for some.

Complications can result: There's a minimal risk of complications, such as a punctured uterus or other damage from the operation. It's a low risk, but it's not nonexistent. Also, sometimes doctors don't manage to remove everything, and the procedure has to be repeated.

You may have to wait longer to try to conceive again: Doctors' advice on this varies, but some will tell you to wait just one month after a natural miscarriage, but most agree that you should wait at least TWO cycles after a d&c to give your uterine lining a chance to build back up and reduce the odds of a subsequent miscarriage.

The psychological impact can be high: Don't underestimate this in making your decision. This is something that's going to vary quite heavily from woman to woman, but I've conversed with a few online that felt d&c was like having a doctor rip their babies from their wombs, despite the fact the baby was not viable. If you think that you're going to have negative psychological feelings about having a d&c, natural miscarriage may be easier on you.

from the third link:
Management
Threatened miscarriages with little blood loss or pain may be managed by seeing one's doctor the next working day to arrange an ultrasound scan to verify that the pregnancy is continuing (i.e., that a fetal heartbeat can be seen).
However, if the bleeding is heavy or accompanied by considerable pain, then emergency medical attention should be sought.
If a miscarriage is complete and bleeding is contained and limited, only expectant management may be necessary (Ankum et al 2001[7]). Excessive or prolonged bleeding needs medical attention. Often a dilation and curettage is indicated to remove tissue from the uterus. Tissue examination, including cytogenetic studies, are helpful to determine the cause of the pregnancy loss (but no routine investigations are undertaken for non-habitual early miscarriages in the UK).
A miscarriage accompanied by a fever needs emergency medical attention.
Severe lower abdominal pain may indicate an ectopic pregnancy and needs emergency medical attention.
[edit]
Psychological aspects
Although a woman physically recovers from a miscarriage quickly, psychological recovery can take a long time. Women can differ a lot in this regard: some are 'over' it after a few months, others take more than a year. Still other women may feel relief or other less negative emotions.

For the women who do go through a process of grief, it is often as if the baby had been born but died. How short a time the child in her womb has lived may not matter for the feeling of loss. From the moment a woman becomes aware that she is pregnant she can start to bond with her unborn child. When the child turns out not to be viable, dreams, fantasies and plans for the future are disturbed roughly.

Besides the feeling of loss, a lack of understanding by others is often important. People who have not experienced a miscarriage themselves may find it hard to empathise with what has occured and how upsetting it may be. This may lead to unrealistic expectations of the woman's recovery. The pregnancy and miscarriage are hardly mentioned anymore in conversation, often too because the subject is too painful. This can make the woman feel isolated.

Interaction with pregnant women and newborn children is often also painful for a woman who has miscarried. Sometimes this makes the interaction with friends, acquaintances and family very difficult. Immediately after a miscarriage some women do not leave home at all for fear of meeting acquaintances or pregnant women.

Some things a woman can do to deal with a miscarriage better are:

naming the child
keeping photos
arranging a funeral for the child
reading books on the subject
talking about it
finding others who have gone through a miscarriage
finding professional help: although it is a natural grieving process, it may take a long time. In such cases, a psychologist or grief counselor may be of help.
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  #16  
October 16th, 2006, 01:27 PM
dinamommy's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Just a little warning about D&C's: My doctor told a friend of mine that the more D&C's you have, the harder it may be for you to carry a child to term. She didn't know this and had one with her first m/c early in her pregnancy. He wouldn't do it with her second m/c (she had a different doctor with the first m/c). Also, my doctor accidentally scraped one of his patients too hard when he was performing a D&C on her. Her lining in her uterus is now very thin and she has had troubles (she may not be able to carry a baby now). I absolutely know that sometimes D&C's are necessary and can even save your life, but if you don't absolutely have to have one, I would think twice about it.
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  #17  
October 16th, 2006, 01:32 PM
mrobinson
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Just a little warning about D&C's: My doctor told a friend of mine that the more D&C's you have, the harder it may be for you to carry a child to term. She didn't know this and had one with her first m/c early in her pregnancy. He wouldn't do it with her second m/c (she had a different doctor with the first m/c). Also, my doctor accidentally scraped one of his patients too hard when he was performing a D&C on her. Her lining in her uterus is now very thin and she has had troubles (she may not be able to carry a baby now). I absolutely know that sometimes D&C's are necessary and can even save your life, but if you don't absolutely have to have one, I would think twice about it.[/b]
Beck has been awesome at explaining this.. Honestly if it wasn't for her, I wouldn't have known a choice existed.
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  #18  
October 16th, 2006, 01:38 PM
dinamommy's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Yes, Beck is wonderful. She's a wealth of knowledge and seems like a very compassionate person. I have learned a lot from reading her posts and she's been so nice to me during my miscarriage.
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  #19  
October 16th, 2006, 02:04 PM
kadydid
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I had a D&C when mine died just before 20 weeks. I had placenta previa and it was not coming on its own. I wish I would have delivered naturally, but honestly could not wait any more than I did. Knowing that your fetus has died, is very hard on a woman and generally any more than 3 days and a woman is at risk for severe depression.

Luckily my ob at the time was the head of surgery at the hospital and did a great job for me. But I think if the time is not too long, and everything is okay other wise, it should probably be handled by Mother Nature.

I never went back to that doctor, I couldn’t….
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  #20  
October 16th, 2006, 02:08 PM
mrobinson
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