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Toxoplasmosis: Cat litter and Pregnancy


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  #1  
January 3rd, 2010, 04:55 PM
moon~maiden's Avatar Cheryl~ birth truster
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Location: south eastern Mass
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Quote:
If you are pregnant you have probably heard that you should not change cat litter during your pregnancy. You may be wondering why. Changing cat litter puts you at risk for contracting an infection called toxoplasmosis. There are several ways that a pregnant woman could contract toxoplasmosis but cats are known to be common carriers of the infection.
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  #2  
January 3rd, 2010, 04:55 PM
moon~maiden's Avatar Cheryl~ birth truster
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Location: south eastern Mass
Posts: 13,088
Toxoplasmosis is not as common as people believe! If you have an indoor cat all you need to do is wear gloves when you change the box. It's not something to stress over!
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  #3  
March 21st, 2010, 12:01 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2010
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Quote:
If you are pregnant you have probably heard that you should not change cat litter during your pregnancy. You may be wondering why. Changing cat litter puts you at risk for contracting an infection called toxoplasmosis. There are several ways that a pregnant woman could contract toxoplasmosis but cats are known to be common carriers of the infection.
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  #4  
March 21st, 2010, 12:01 PM
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By all means be really really smart when it comes to your unborn child and listen to MOON~MAIDEN. After all, what do all those learned and scholarly doctors know eh?

Just don't forget to tell your doctor, when he's working out a complicated, regimented, and painful doses of antibiotics for you to take while you spend the remaining 4 mos. of your pregnancy in the hospital because your baby is now toxic and possibly you or it will now die, that MOON~MAIDEN said it was fine if you wore gloves.
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  #5  
May 5th, 2010, 04:09 PM
eharmony
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This is really scary.
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  #6  
November 17th, 2010, 07:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Free_Reality_ Checks_Here View Post
By all means be really really smart when it comes to your unborn child and listen to MOON~MAIDEN. After all, what do all those learned and scholarly doctors know eh?

Just don't forget to tell your doctor, when he's working out a complicated, regimented, and painful doses of antibiotics for you to take while you spend the remaining 4 mos. of your pregnancy in the hospital because your baby is now toxic and possibly you or it will now die, that MOON~MAIDEN said it was fine if you wore gloves.
People seriously need to do some proper research so that they understand how you can catch toxoplasmosis from cats before they make comments such as these. Articles on toxoplasmosis are usually way oversimplified: a very specific and unique set of circumstances have to occur before you would be able to catch this from your cat. Those circumstances involve your cat catching it for the first time in its life, within a certain number of days of infecting you, the litter has to stay in the box for a certain number of days for it to incubate and then it has to find it's way into your body, i.e., getting litterbox matter into your mouth. As for it incubating a certain number of days, that's why they saying changing the litter box every day may help, but they don't explain why....because these articles are almost always way, way oversimplified. And then you have people come along and make comments like this without proper knowledge.

The truth is, you are far more likely to catch toxoplasmosis during pregnancy from your everyday life than from anything having to do with your cat. Look at the other causes and assess the risks for yourself. Of all the ways I can catch toxo, my cat is the last one I am worried about.
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  #7  
November 17th, 2010, 07:33 PM
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If you go to the Humane Society website, you can read the REAL facts, and not rely on forum posts, or incomplete articles. They have a full and accurate article there, spelling out how unlikely it is for you to get it from your cat, as well as all the other ways you can catch it that you need to be more concerned about.

Partial quote from the Humane Society website:

"Likelihood of contracting toxoplasmosis
Because it's difficult for cats to transmit toxoplasmosis directly to their caregivers, a pregnant woman is generally unlikely to contract the disease from her pet cat.

Several factors keep the chance of such transmission low. First of all, only cats who ingest tissue cysts get infected. Within the feline population, this would be limited to outdoor cats who hunt and eat rodents, as well as cats who are fed raw meat by their owners. In addition, only after a cat is first exposed to T. gondii does he typically excrete oocysts, and he does so for only two weeks. An outdoor hunting cat is often exposed to the disease as a kitten and is, therefore, less likely to transmit the infection as he ages.

Secondly, because oocysts become infective only after one to five days, exposure to the disease is unlikely as long as the cat's litter box is changed daily.

Finally, since oocysts are transmitted by ingestion, in order to contract toxoplasmosis, a woman would have to make contact with contaminated feces in the litter box and then, without washing her hands, touch her mouth or otherwise transmit the contaminated fecal matter to her digestive system."

Last edited by Linz; November 18th, 2010 at 09:27 AM. Reason: copyright
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  #8  
July 2nd, 2013, 11:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 20
Very informative and i think it has enough information about the topic.
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