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Delaying Cord Clamping?


Forum: May 2012 Playroom

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  #1  
February 28th, 2012, 06:14 AM
melissalaw's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Okay since we have been talking about all that happens right after birth, can somebody explain the benefits to me of delaying the cord clamping? I know I remember us talking about this before but can't remember the reason.
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  #2  
February 28th, 2012, 06:28 AM
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Lots of benefits. One the placenta has quite a bit of really oxygen rich blood that the baby would lose with standard clamping. So it can help with their initial oxygen levels as they take their first few breathe. Also studies have shown that it can help with anemia even several months later.
It doesn't have to be delayed long, just until it stops pulsating.

The reason they clamped early is there was a theory that the oxygen rich blood caused jaundice-but it's been dis-proven.
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  #3  
February 28th, 2012, 06:31 AM
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Thanks Sam!!
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  #4  
February 28th, 2012, 10:27 AM
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Pretty much what Sam said. Also, many babies need more blood and it can allow them to pull more blood from the placenta if they need more, etc.

There's also been some studies for RH negative women, that doing delayed cord clamping helps avoid the blood of the baby transfusing into the mother's blood stream.
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  #5  
February 28th, 2012, 04:02 PM
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I talked to my doctor about it today. She told me it doesn't make much, if any, difference & that therearen't too many studies to support the claims behind it. I'm sure this will be unpopular but that's what she said.
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  #6  
February 28th, 2012, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Sa712 View Post
I talked to my doctor about it today. She told me it doesn't make much, if any, difference & that therearen't too many studies to support the claims behind it. I'm sure this will be unpopular but that's what she said.
Actually, what she said is somewhat true. It's true there aren't a ton of studies done yet. The most recent and largest one was done in Sweden studying 400 babies. The babies either had the cord clamped after 10 seconds or after 3 minutes, the ones that had it after 3 minutes did have better iron levels at 4 months and were less likely to have newborn anemia.

Most babies are fine whether the cord is clamped quickly or not, the delayed clamping helps 1 out of every 20 babies or so. So, it doesn't make that much difference for a lot of babies. It's enough though that the World Health Organization stopped recommending early clamping a few years ago, and Britain's NHS, plus other countries, are looking to standardize delayed clamping.
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February 28th, 2012, 05:21 PM
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At work we are just supposed to clamp the cord if the baby is on moms chest. Last nurse delivery I had I just flopped the baby up there after a little suctioning and the doc came in after and wasn't happy that I hadn't clamped the cord yet. But she was pretty anal and old fashioned as I see other docs do it all the time. she retired finally in December. I don't have a preference for my baby.
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  #8  
February 29th, 2012, 08:41 PM
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Last edited by NotDoneBaking; July 4th, 2012 at 08:42 PM.
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  #9  
February 29th, 2012, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Khaleesi View Post
We're planning on doing delayed cord clamping, and I just wanted to say that the part above about some babies having too much blood is interesting... something I haven't heard before!
I think it's pretty rare for them to have too much blood and it's associated with some medical problems, but it can happen according to some research. Honestly, I'm not sure why that would be an issue anyway though. I'm removing that part of the sentence from my original post because I can't find the correct study now and I don't want to confuse anyone. And some OBs actually use that as a reason to clamp early - they think that the blood will drain out of the baby if the cord isn't clamped immediately. I think the thinking behind that is it occurs if the baby is held higher than the placenta, or vice versa, but it's been proven wrong.

Generally, the delayed cord clamping helps them get more blood, which is what most babies can benefit from. And that would be the reasoning that I would tell my provider if they wanted to know why I wanted delayed cord clamping. Even clamping it just 3 minutes after birth versus immediately reduces the chance of the baby becoming anemic.
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  #10  
February 29th, 2012, 09:53 PM
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Last edited by NotDoneBaking; July 4th, 2012 at 08:42 PM.
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  #11  
March 2nd, 2012, 03:12 AM
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I would like to delay but am not comfortable with a completely physiological third stage as my parity is four now and I'm 38 (not to mention with my 17 week loss/induction of labour I hemoraged - blood pressure at 50/24 = near death experience! Of course, at 17 weeks the placenta is never really going to come away on its own and the receptors for the syntocinon injection to make the uterus clamp down aren't there at that stage of the pregnancy but I am plagued with fears now for this delivery even though it's a different kettle of fish at term). In short, I worry about PPH now (and never did before!).

Also, my labours are FAST and the babies tend to arrive shocked - DS2 passed meconium before delivery (labour was 1 hour 40 mins) and needed a little help to get breathing so they cut the cord right away to help him rather than wait as I had said I would like to happen.

In short, they're happy to let you have a physiological third stage/delay clamping here in the UK so long as everything is 'ok' when baby arrives - sometimes they just need to whip them off any way with all the best intentions before their arrival.

Oh! But the benefits? As I understand it, the baby has a relatively small blood volume and a surprising percentage of it is sitting in the cord at delivery (in a term infant, perhaps 30%, higher in a preemie). Nature is pretty amazing and don't you think there is a reason the cord carries on pulsing after delivery? It's to get that blood into the baby where it belongs! Nature doesn't intend that you cut the cord immediately and throw that blood away!.

Delaying clamping isn't convenient which I think, from the many, MANY, US birth shows I've watched doesn't fit with the typical OB model of birth - things are scheduled, progress must follow a set time limit, and if it doesn't there is intervention. I'm certainly not arguing the rights or wrongs of this model, just that it... is. I wonder what most of your OB's would say to you if you said you'd like to delay clamping until the cord had stopped pulsing... Indeed, have any of you said so?

Umbilical Cord Clamping -* Immediate or Delayed An article, written by a US midwife, quoting a US Dr, which is in depth enough to 'say it like it is' but in layman terms that can be understood
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Last edited by AmandaHugNKiss; March 2nd, 2012 at 03:19 AM.
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  #12  
March 2nd, 2012, 03:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twhylite21 View Post
I think the thinking behind that is it occurs if the baby is held higher than the placenta, or vice versa, but it's been proven wrong.
I had an EMT tell me this once... that they have to clamp the cord or the blood would drain out. *sigh*
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  #13  
March 2nd, 2012, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmandaHugNKiss View Post



Delaying clamping isn't convenient which I think, from the many, MANY, US birth shows I've watched doesn't fit with the typical OB model of birth - things are scheduled, progress must follow a set time limit, and if it doesn't there is intervention. I'm certainly not arguing the rights or wrongs of this model, just that it... is. I wonder what most of your OB's would say to you if you said you'd like to delay clamping until the cord had stopped pulsing... Indeed, have any of you said so?

Umbilical Cord Clamping -* Immediate or Delayed An article, written by a US midwife, quoting a US Dr, which is in depth enough to 'say it like it is' but in layman terms that can be understood
Lily was born at the hospital and they were fine with us delaying clamping until the cord completely stopped pulsing, which was about 10 minutes or so. Vi was home birth and the midwives delayed it (that was their protocol anyway) and again, it took about 10 minutes to totally stop pulsing and it turned whitish.
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