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  #1  
January 9th, 2013, 11:26 AM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Any other homeschooling mamas here?
Any one planning on homeschooling, or curious about it?
If you are curious, what are your hopes? Your concerns? Do you have any questions about it?

We're a long way off from schooling these little beans, obviously, but I'm sure most people will agree it's never too early to start thinking about your child's education. So if anyone has any questions about homeschooling, I'm happy to answer, and I'm sure any other homeschooling mamas on the board would be happy to pitch in with their comments too?
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  #2  
January 9th, 2013, 11:49 AM
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I have been teeter tottering with the idea of homeschooling for about a year and a half.
My main worry is: can I do it? I don't want to mess up and "fail" my children because I wasn't an adequate teacher. I did look into some local homeschooling groups that looked to be a lot of fun and probably a great source of help. My husband and I decided to hold off on looking into it for now though because we plan to move to a different city in a few months and would hate to uproot the kids from new friends again.

The reasons I want to homeschool:
First and foremost, I feel like my step son is being severely neglected by this school. I have had so many parent/teacher conferences, letters to the teacher, meetings with the vice principal and principal. Multiple times I've been SO annoyed by what i hear that I have just walked into the school and demanded to speak with someone. He has a sensory processing disorder (all the "official" stuff is still being worked out with OT), and we are thinking it is really interfering with how he learns. The poor kid is in the middle of 2nd grade and last night he spend an HOUR trying to figure out a math problem that was essentially "67-31=___" but because it was written as addition -"backwards" to him (67=31+___) - he could not figure it out. The teachers keep telling me NOT to help him because when he gets help in the class room he plugs the answer in and keeps on moving. I feel like it's not a matter of HIM not wanting to do the work, it's these teachers NOT knowing the proper way to be teaching a child like him. My sister is a special education teacher and she completely agrees with me but we can't get him an IEP or extra help from a resource teacher because we haven't gotten an "official" diagnosis we can take to the school to start the process. It seems like with him we take one step forward and two steps back. It's been like this since his first day of kindergarten. Just nothing but problems and stress, for him AND me.
Oops, turned into a long rant. Could be longer though, I promise! haha

Other factors: I hate the "new system" they use to teach the kids. They claim it's easier but it confuses them so much.
The SECURITY issue. I know I'm not the only parent worried now about sending my children to school. I do my darndest to not let THEM be scared, but *I* am terrified.

Oh, and a sidenote: I have tried to change their school and been denied every single time. It's like I'm stuck!
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  #3  
January 9th, 2013, 12:47 PM
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DH and I really want to homeschool. But I am afraid I cannot stick to it. I bought a plan book for DD and made age appropriate activities and could not keep up with it. She also does not listen to me but listens beautifully to others. We do a coop preK once a week and I can just tell if I left she would do so much better. I am signing her up for a drop-off program next year. We tried it out yesterday and she learned so much in just one day. So we will see how it goes from there. She has an IFSP right now and we will be transitioning to the school system this year for her IEP since she is aging out. Depending on what services she needs she may be in a school no matter what we choose.
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  #4  
January 9th, 2013, 12:50 PM
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I started homeschooling my oldest this year. I ordered a curriculum online and have been using that. So far it is going ok. There have definitely been some "growing pains" but we are getting it figured out and are going to continue.
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  #5  
January 9th, 2013, 01:12 PM
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I admire people who homeschool.

I wouldn't have the patience for it. I get frustrated just helping ds with his homework. It just wouldn't be good for us, but I do think you ladies who do it are great!
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  #6  
January 9th, 2013, 01:23 PM
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We are definitely considering it - in fact, I was just looking at homeschool groups in the city we are going to move to before my oldest starts kindergarten.

I'm not so concerned about whether or not he'll learn as much as I'm worried that I'm not up for the task. Or that we're not well suited to do school together. And call me selfish, I really fear not having any breaks from being a parent! I'd be very interested in a part time program along the lines of a 2 day a week homeschool supplemental school. They have a couple of those around here, but I can't find any in the city where we're moving.
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  #7  
January 9th, 2013, 01:46 PM
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I've homeschooled my 11 yr old since 1st grade. He's now in 5th. I also home-preschool my 3 yr old.
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  #8  
January 9th, 2013, 02:16 PM
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I do the so your baby can read with both of my kids, but that will be the extent of everything for us. DH and I made a deal that I would finish up my schooling and then I would be the sole provider for our family. That means DH will be the one home with them, and he so does not have that kind of patience to do it.
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  #9  
January 9th, 2013, 02:56 PM
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I'm pretty sure we'll be sticking with public education. I'm a credentialed teacher and plan on having my kids go where I teach (when I start up again). We live in a great school district. And even if the kids have a few sub-par teachers I have no problem requesting a switch or just filling the gaps myself at home.

I do admit though sometimes, especially after these horrible violent events at schools, I want to keep my kiddos safe at home.
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  #10  
January 9th, 2013, 03:11 PM
mommymichael's Avatar I am strong.
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We homeschool. My eldest is 6 and is reading, writing, doing multiplication. He's a bright little guy. My 5yr old has nooooo interest yet so I'm waiting on him. Every now and then we work together on something and he does very well. I love homeschooling. =)
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  #11  
January 9th, 2013, 03:43 PM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Momma2Chase:

Can I do it?
Anyone can do it, if they are willing. There might be a learning curve--mostly learning how your child learns best (which is something you don't often get from teachers in public school). But it's really not so hard Plus, nowadays there are tons of tools and programs that help teach, grade, and track.

I don't want to mess up and "fail" my children because I wasn't an adequate teacher.
There's always a chance a child will turn out uneducated, despite any teacher's best efforts. This seems more common in public school that homeschooling, though. Mostly because, as parents, we care about our children more than our children's teachers do. I can't speak for everyone, because some people's kids work well "in the system" and do great with public school. In my case, I would have been failing my children if I left them in public school. In the end, everyone needs to do what is best for their child's education (whether it's public school or homeschooling). If public school doesn't cut it, you WILL do well enough and not fail your child because you CARE enough to do whatever you need to do.

we plan to move to a different city in a few months and would hate to uproot the kids from new friends again.
Well, that's going to happen whether you use public school or private school


I understand you reasons for wanting to home school. We FOUGHT the school for YEARS with my son. We did EVERYTHING we could. In the end, I spent more time fighting for his education than he spent actually learning anything. On top of that, he would come home at the end of the day and I would have to try to "supplement" his education just so he could get his homework done. But by that time of day, he was too tired to pay attention. The result? 12 hours a day of "school" and very little learning going on. Now that we are homeschooling, we have 2 hours a day of school and about 10x as much learning going on. Sensory was a big factor for my son but even when we got him in an appropriate classroom, he still had troubles. Yes, these kids learn differently. For example, my son had trouble with subtraction because he saw it visually instead of mathematically.

For him:
2 - 2 = 2.
Why?
because he was looking at it as: you have 2 there and 2 there and then you take 2 away.
[2] - 2 (imagine crossing out the 2 that is in the brackets). Well, if he did that, he still saw a 2 that hadn't been crossed out.
So he just saw the problem the wrong way.

also, we got a diagnosis for my son and the school just ignored it. once we had it, all of a sudden THEY wanted to test him to see what diagnosis they came up with (which makes you wonder why they didn't do that in the first place). Even when he got his IEP, it didn't help. It was a lot of politics and meetings and in the end, still no learning going on. For a long time, I didn't want to home school because I didn't feel qualified to home school an autistic child. but you'd be surprised the progress you can make.

Also, nowadays they have "no child left behind' which means they were trying to move my son up grades even when he was NOT ready and didn't know the material from the previous year. He was also the youngest kid in his class, so staying back a year wouldn't have hurt him. He barely made the cut off in the first place (birthday was always a few days after school started). We have kids these days going to HIGH SCHOOL who STILL cannot READ. Not all schools are bad, and there are some GREAT teachers out there. However, part of the problem is that these really great teachers aren't able to "work their magic" as well under the system, so it's a waste. I don't blame the teachers for this, obviously. Of course, just as there are some great teachers there are also some truly AWFUL ones (even I had tons of awful teachers growing up--more bad than good!). And you have little say in where your kid ends up and even if you CAN change classes, sometimes your kid has to go through something awful before you realize that is necessary.

And yes, security is an issue. Of course, you can't shelter your kid from the world. And they do need to learn to operate in structure that doesn't conform to their specific learning needs. But in trying to do this, we can't raise kids who are completely uneducated because they struggled to learn under the current system. It's great for kids who fit the mold, but what about those that don't? And those kids are our future, really. Who is going to change this world--those who know how to think like everyone else, or those who think different and understand how they think and how to utilize their unique thinking process?

Hope this helps!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin_0225 View Post
DH and I really want to homeschool. But I am afraid I cannot stick to it. I bought a plan book for DD and made age appropriate activities and could not keep up with it. She also does not listen to me but listens beautifully to others. We do a coop preK once a week and I can just tell if I left she would do so much better. I am signing her up for a drop-off program next year. We tried it out yesterday and she learned so much in just one day. So we will see how it goes from there. She has an IFSP right now and we will be transitioning to the school system this year for her IEP since she is aging out. Depending on what services she needs she may be in a school no matter what we choose.
The key is not to overdo it and keep it fun. I thought at first my daughter would be better in public school, but once we got settled into things and I stopped stressing, her learning blossomed, and her behavior over school with me is fantastic now. To be honest, I think the kids who benefit MOST from home schooling is special needs children (if they are blessed with parents who have patience--and it's easier to find that patience from a parent than a teacher, so I've noticed). We've actually had cases of physical and emotional abuse from teachers in my son's school (who totally got away with it). Not worth it. But it's a risk you take sending your kid to public school and thankfully for most parents that risk is small and nothing bad ever happens. And, of course, there are risks with everything, even home schooling.
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  #12  
January 9th, 2013, 03:48 PM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KnitterLaurel View Post
I started homeschooling my oldest this year. I ordered a curriculum online and have been using that. So far it is going ok. There have definitely been some "growing pains" but we are getting it figured out and are going to continue.
There's been a learning curve for us, too. The longer you do it, though, the easier it gets. Within 2 weeks of homeschooling we saw huge improvements in my son--educationally, emotionally, behaviorally. That doesn't mean it was easy, though, but the longer we did it, the easier it got

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishgirl99 View Post
I admire people who homeschool.

I wouldn't have the patience for it. I get frustrated just helping ds with his homework. It just wouldn't be good for us, but I do think you ladies who do it are great!
Oh man, I understand that. I used to get SO frustrated trying to help my son with homework when he was in school. But man, once we started homeschooling, there was SO MUCH LESS to get frustrated about. My life is so much less stressful now, including school. I would say for those hesitating to try it, try it over the summer. Only takes a couple hours a day and even if you decide to go back to public school it's not like it's going to hurt them to get extended education over the summer
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  #13  
January 9th, 2013, 03:57 PM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babsbabies View Post
We are definitely considering it - in fact, I was just looking at homeschool groups in the city we are going to move to before my oldest starts kindergarten.

I'm not so concerned about whether or not he'll learn as much as I'm worried that I'm not up for the task. Or that we're not well suited to do school together. And call me selfish, I really fear not having any breaks from being a parent! I'd be very interested in a part time program along the lines of a 2 day a week homeschool supplemental school. They have a couple of those around here, but I can't find any in the city where we're moving.
totally normal concerns Here's some suggestions, if you do go the homeschool route:
Don't let an 'off' day deter you. Get back on track the next day and don't worry about "making up" for lost days.
Find independent, self-teaching work and programs you can use as your "core" curriculum, then supplement from there as needed.
Keep in mind it doesn't take 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. We do 2 hours a day, 4 days a week, and at that pace my kids finish 1 year of school in 6 months--so we never have to stress about missing days or falling behind. Structure your curriculum to give yourself breathing room.
Take breaks! you can still take a break from being a parent, even if you home school I will say this, too. Homeschooling HAS been a break to me. I don't have to get up early in the morning. And in PS that required me helping my kids with 3-4 hours of homework a night (because my kids are too TIRED from school to concentrate and haven't learned enough in those 8 hours to forgo the need for homework). Now we do homeschooling for 2 or so hours a day (less time then I used to spend helping them with homework!) and I can cut off that hour in the morning I had to spend getting them ready with my eyes still crusted shut from being woken at the crack of dawn.
You can also start a homeschooling partnership, similar to how carpooling works. Like maybe you drop your kids off for math at a homeschooling friends house while you go grocery shopping in peace! The later in the week, they drop their kids at your house for reading while they get a break or do their grocery shopping. I also take help from friends or family or even my husband if I just need a day to myself. I find myself needing that less now that my kids are HS'd though. PSing was SO stressful for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkbaxter612 View Post
I've homeschooled my 11 yr old since 1st grade. He's now in 5th. I also home-preschool my 3 yr old.

WOO HOO! I haven't gotten that far along yet, but I'm sure that will be a learning curve for me, too. The good thing is you don't have to figure it all out over night

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhD_Bound_Mommy View Post
I do the so your baby can read with both of my kids, but that will be the extent of everything for us. DH and I made a deal that I would finish up my schooling and then I would be the sole provider for our family. That means DH will be the one home with them, and he so does not have that kind of patience to do it.
SAHD's are awesome! Of course, isn't your husband cheating if he gets to stay home while they are in school? He better be doing the cooking and cleaning while you are at work! haha

My husband doesn't have the patience to be in charge of the kids like that though lol. However, oddly enough, he's great about the HSing. I guess because it's pretty easy. I wanted to HS for years but he didn't want to, but when he saw how poor the education system has become, HE actually suggested we make the switch. I was impressed. And a little scared at first, because I'd already moved onto this idea of having an empty house all day. But in the end, it worked out. You have to do what is right for your family though. In the end, I think even those who don't want to HS WOULD do it if that is what it took to give their kids a good education. But if you don't want to HS *and* you don't need to, then I can't see why you should or would!
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  #14  
January 9th, 2013, 04:04 PM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachbabies View Post
I'm pretty sure we'll be sticking with public education. I'm a credentialed teacher and plan on having my kids go where I teach (when I start up again). We live in a great school district. And even if the kids have a few sub-par teachers I have no problem requesting a switch or just filling the gaps myself at home.

I do admit though sometimes, especially after these horrible violent events at schools, I want to keep my kiddos safe at home.
I might possibly feel different if I worked in a school and lived in a great school district, but then, I've lived in great school districts before and that wasn't enough (for me--might have been for my kids, though--I don't know). But at the same time, then I never would have tried HSing so I never would have been able to compare. In other words, under difference circumstances I never would have started HSing and I never would have realized how much better I find it to be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommymichael View Post
We homeschool. My eldest is 6 and is reading, writing, doing multiplication. He's a bright little guy. My 5yr old has nooooo interest yet so I'm waiting on him. Every now and then we work together on something and he does very well. I love homeschooling. =)
YAY! That's fantastic! and it's one of the best things about HSing! you can work at the child's pace--this way they don't get bored OR get left behind when the teacher moves on before the child is ready. You can also teach them based on the way THEY learn best (as opposed to strangers teaching them the way they are told they have to teach them, even if that way is NOT getting through to the kid).
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  #15  
January 9th, 2013, 04:48 PM
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We started homeschooling this year with kindergarten, dd is doing well. We have a hard time doing it every day, but if we aren't doing normal worksheet/work book lessons we are doing life lessons- or I guess they call it un-schooling. We cook and can garden, play outside stuff like that. Next year for first grade I'm planning to get some sort of curriculum to help us better stay on track.
We decided to homeschool because we've seen the village, and don't want it raising our children...lol My my homeschooled my sis (she started kindergarten the year a graduated) and she really did so much better at home than I did at school...
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  #16  
January 9th, 2013, 04:54 PM
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I'd love to but I'm a horrible teacher. I know things but when it comes to explaining it I suck, haha. Also since I'm a SAHM, school is the only break I get. If when they are a little older and they are being bullied I'd defiantly look into them finishing school online at home.
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  #17  
January 9th, 2013, 04:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharilyn View Post
We decided to homeschool because we've seen the village, and don't want it raising our children...lol
This exactly.
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  #18  
January 9th, 2013, 05:22 PM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharilyn View Post
We decided to homeschool because we've seen the village, and don't want it raising our children...lol
LMAO I love that! <3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2RickyRanaJavier View Post
I'd love to but I'm a horrible teacher. I know things but when it comes to explaining it I suck, haha. Also since I'm a SAHM, school is the only break I get. If when they are a little older and they are being bullied I'd defiantly look into them finishing school online at home.
You'd do fine, if you ever decide to go that route. you'd surprise yourself But what I'm most happy about with your post is that you are willing to do what is necessary to protect your children, if the need ever arises. That's what is important--doing what is best for your kids, even if it's hard. And what is best at one time in their life may or may not be different later in life. Right now you are doing what is best for your family and you would do what was best even if what was best changed. that's a great way to parent
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  #19  
January 9th, 2013, 05:35 PM
Momma2Chase's Avatar August 2013 DDC Co-Host
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alittlelost View Post
Momma2Chase:

Can I do it?
Anyone can do it, if they are willing. There might be a learning curve--mostly learning how your child learns best (which is something you don't often get from teachers in public school). But it's really not so hard Plus, nowadays there are tons of tools and programs that help teach, grade, and track.

I don't want to mess up and "fail" my children because I wasn't an adequate teacher.
There's always a chance a child will turn out uneducated, despite any teacher's best efforts. This seems more common in public school that homeschooling, though. Mostly because, as parents, we care about our children more than our children's teachers do. I can't speak for everyone, because some people's kids work well "in the system" and do great with public school. In my case, I would have been failing my children if I left them in public school. In the end, everyone needs to do what is best for their child's education (whether it's public school or homeschooling). If public school doesn't cut it, you WILL do well enough and not fail your child because you CARE enough to do whatever you need to do.

we plan to move to a different city in a few months and would hate to uproot the kids from new friends again.
Well, that's going to happen whether you use public school or private school


I understand you reasons for wanting to home school. We FOUGHT the school for YEARS with my son. We did EVERYTHING we could. In the end, I spent more time fighting for his education than he spent actually learning anything. On top of that, he would come home at the end of the day and I would have to try to "supplement" his education just so he could get his homework done. But by that time of day, he was too tired to pay attention. The result? 12 hours a day of "school" and very little learning going on. Now that we are homeschooling, we have 2 hours a day of school and about 10x as much learning going on. Sensory was a big factor for my son but even when we got him in an appropriate classroom, he still had troubles. Yes, these kids learn differently. For example, my son had trouble with subtraction because he saw it visually instead of mathematically.

For him:
2 - 2 = 2.
Why?
because he was looking at it as: you have 2 there and 2 there and then you take 2 away.
[2] - 2 (imagine crossing out the 2 that is in the brackets). Well, if he did that, he still saw a 2 that hadn't been crossed out.
So he just saw the problem the wrong way.

also, we got a diagnosis for my son and the school just ignored it. once we had it, all of a sudden THEY wanted to test him to see what diagnosis they came up with (which makes you wonder why they didn't do that in the first place). Even when he got his IEP, it didn't help. It was a lot of politics and meetings and in the end, still no learning going on. For a long time, I didn't want to home school because I didn't feel qualified to home school an autistic child. but you'd be surprised the progress you can make.

Also, nowadays they have "no child left behind' which means they were trying to move my son up grades even when he was NOT ready and didn't know the material from the previous year. He was also the youngest kid in his class, so staying back a year wouldn't have hurt him. He barely made the cut off in the first place (birthday was always a few days after school started). We have kids these days going to HIGH SCHOOL who STILL cannot READ. Not all schools are bad, and there are some GREAT teachers out there. However, part of the problem is that these really great teachers aren't able to "work their magic" as well under the system, so it's a waste. I don't blame the teachers for this, obviously. Of course, just as there are some great teachers there are also some truly AWFUL ones (even I had tons of awful teachers growing up--more bad than good!). And you have little say in where your kid ends up and even if you CAN change classes, sometimes your kid has to go through something awful before you realize that is necessary.

And yes, security is an issue. Of course, you can't shelter your kid from the world. And they do need to learn to operate in structure that doesn't conform to their specific learning needs. But in trying to do this, we can't raise kids who are completely uneducated because they struggled to learn under the current system. It's great for kids who fit the mold, but what about those that don't? And those kids are our future, really. Who is going to change this world--those who know how to think like everyone else, or those who think different and understand how they think and how to utilize their unique thinking process?

Hope this helps!

Thanks! That was actually really helpful!
And a huge UGH to "No child left behind," my sister is always talking about it and how awful it is for a good majority of the children it's effecting.
Our sons sound pretty similar, actually. Aaron started kindergarten as the youngest child (he was born 8/19 so he started 2 weeks after turning 5) in the class, and he went in with a huge disadvantage in the first place: My husband's exwife had custody of their kids for the year prior to Aaron going to kindergarten. She was SUPPOSED to enroll the kid in pre-k, but never did. Not only that, but she didn't bother to even teach him herself. He started kindergarten no knowing the ABCs, numbers, some colors, or even how to spell his name. My husband was a single dad and was a little "lost" and didn't realize he could have opted to keep Aaron out of Kindergarten the first year and put him in a pre-k program instead. So he put him in and all of the kids were lightyears ahead of him- even the kindergarten teacher said so. And the kicker: not once did she slow down to make sure he was grasping it. She said she had to go the pace of the majority in the class. I spent that entire year driving myself crazy because I couldn't do anything about it and it was so stressful. Homework was an awful ordeal each night... I would literally have to sit with him for hours because he just did not get the concept. He couldn't understand "beside" or "underneath," and math was just completely out the window. He would come home with graded paperwork and EVERYTHING was always marked wrong! And of course, that meant I needed to harass the teacher yet again. Yes, everything he did was wrong but he was still passing the class based on [insert something here].
*sigh* So we ended kindergarten year no better than we started it, except he could "KIND OF" read. My husband and I specifically met with the principal and requested to keep him back in kindergarten the following year. We spoke at length with Aaron about this decision and he was excited about it because his neighborhood friends hadn't started yet and he'd be in class with them. The principal told us "NO!" She said he had already been passed and therefore there was nothing we could do about it! We were livid!
So 1st grade basically goes the same way... and at the end of it, i didn't ask for him to be left in 1st grade but I did quiz the teacher a million times on whether or not he SHOULD be advanced. Her answer each time? "He's a very sweet boy and he's SO helpful to his classmates." I agree, he IS sweet and helpful but does that mean academically he should be moved to the next grade?
So after 2nd grade I tried to move him and his sister to a new school and we were denied. So I tried another school: denied.

Sorry, got long again. This is such a HUGE issue in our life. I think I am going to talk to my husband about it again when he comes home!
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January 9th, 2013, 05:36 PM
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I have been thinking deeply about homeschooling for some time. I just don't know thatIi could do it.
Somthing I really do not understand is the difference between medical necessity and educational. I knowIi am going to explain this all wrong like I always do (hence my worry about adequately teaching my kiddos) My son is also Autistic. He has an IEP in place and is in the exceptional Childrens Program through Headstart, in a public primary school. Now, when he was tested through headstart he was not found in need of speech, OT, or PT. So I figured all was well. WRONG!! A few months later we went to the doc for his yearly exam and she immediately set him up for evauluation. He is severely universally delayed. He attends speech 2x a week with a vocab of less than 400 words at 5 years old, OT weekly and PT weekly. He wears DAFOs (hard plastic braces on his feet and lower legs) etc etc. I just don't understand how these things do not affect him in an educational setting? maybe one of you can eplin it in mama terms and not school?
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