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  #21  
April 19th, 2013, 08:49 AM
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There is a great book my first lactation consultant gave me years ago. It's called The Nursing Mothers Companion by Kathleen Huggins, get the newest version it's lavender in color. There are so many tips and tricks I could write for days,weeks even but it is very individual and different with each baby. Some come out great nursers, others have to practice,practice,practice. I read this book and only this book starting right after delivery in the hospital. It is scary because it discusses every problem you could ever have and how to work through them. Which is why I say read it after delivery when you are going through the learning process. She is like the best friend lactation consultant you could ever want or need. The best advice my first lactation consultant gave me years ago was 'Do you want to nurse your baby?' of course I said 'Yes'. Then she said 'Great, then you'll do it',' It really is mind over matter'. And after all these years of nursing my babies, I've realized she was so right! If you want to do it, you WILL but there are a thousand reasons to talk yourself out of it. You may be blessed to with an easy nurser so don't over worry yourself. Take one day at a time and I liked what someone said earlier,that you'll notice it gets way easier at the six week mark. If you want a good milk supply nurse every three hours,start to start right after delivery. I ask for the hospital grade pump at the hospital. Your insurance usually pays for this. They will give you a Medela starter kit to keep so I always rent the hospital grade pump and have it at home ready to go when I get there. This helps a ton especially when your milk comes in and your breasts are engorged and painful. Think large hard cantaloupes,use the pump to ease the engorgement bc a baby can't latch properly to hard breasts. Always before pumping make your breasts wet with water,this really helps the pump work better. When pumping lean forward and slightly downward a rocking chair works great with a nursing stool for your feet to prop on. I produce enough milk to feed triplets and have to wean my production down slowly so as not to get milk fever-mastitis. Also I have extremely low blood pressure so they pump me full of IV fluids in the hospital during delivery. This usually causes late onset milk production-not so nice side effect. Sometimes my milk won't come in to day five. ALL of my babies have had to have some amount of formula to get started usually for the first two weeks,depending on their weight gain. At the back of Kathleen's book is a babies milk need chart and proper weight gain guidelines based on your babies birth weight. This is the same chart the pediatricians use so I always take it to baby checks with me in the first few weeks. My babies have all nursed to two years unless they self weaned earlier,4 out of my 6 used pacifiers and it never caused nipple confusion. Don't feel bad if you have to supplement in the beginning with a little formula to get things going. One of my babies didn't nurse at all for the first three days because he was in the NICU and I couldn't start until day 4 after his birth. He was my best nurser of all of my babies Just remember 'If you really want to nurse YOU WILL' It also really helps to have a nursing buddy to talk to for encouragement and support!
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  #22  
April 19th, 2013, 08:52 AM
mamalamb's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Is there any chance of introducing a bottle at 2-3 weeks and not dooming our BFing? Selfish, yes, but my birthday is 8/30 and I would LOVE a night out for that LOL
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  #23  
April 19th, 2013, 09:12 AM
Kelllilee's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamalamb View Post
Is there any chance of introducing a bottle at 2-3 weeks and not dooming our BFing? Selfish, yes, but my birthday is 8/30 and I would LOVE a night out for that LOL
yes, particularly if things are going well. However, a bottle is not the only option for feeding baby. Many others will be better at maintaining the breastfeeding relationship if it is still rocky at that stage. Look into finger, tube, cup, or syringe feeding methods.

*most* babies will do fine with one bottle but some don't and it takes extra work to get them back to nursing well.

Also, if you do have to supplement in the early days, ask about alternate feeding options like I listed above. A few issues can stem from supplementing/ using a bottle:

*newborns can EASILY overeat from a bottle. They don't know how to turn it "off". That can set them up to expect that overly full feeling as what's normal, and then they don't feel "full" from the breast. As well as expecting a much faster and easier flow than at the breast.
*Sucking on a bottle is drastically different than nursing a breast. Some babies have a hard time with switching back and forth. If the reason for supplementing is that baby isn't latching well, the bottle will only make it worse.
*Weight loss in the early days can be affected by fluids given at birth - and it can make engorgement worse. Get a second opinion if you are being told the baby has lost too much weight unless you are seeing other signs of not enough milk. Normal weight loss is up to 8-10% of birth weight.



COMMIT yourself to making it work. "There is no try, only do" when it comes to this.
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  #24  
April 19th, 2013, 09:33 AM
Kelllilee's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Hopefully this will be helpful. A lot of moms give up because they don't know what's normal/not normal for breastfed babies. Obviously, this list is not all-inclusive. I'll try to add to it as I think of more things...


NORMAL:
  • Cluster feeding (usually in the evening hours, babies often nurse continually, or VERY frequently for short periods over several hours
  • inconsistent schedule - nursing every 2 hours, then going for 4, then 1, etc...
  • short feedings - normal if baby seems satisfied after for at least 1-2 hours
  • fussing/crying/gassy - not usually caused by breastfeeding though once in a while there is something causing it
  • waking frequently to eat at night
  • not being able to pump much. anywhere from 1-4oz per side is normal in the first couple weeks (one side will usually produce more) The amount you can pump is not a measurement of how much you make
  • sleepy, hard to wake baby - sometimes normal, sometimes not, if it continues past the first few days, seek guidance
  • frequent pauses during nursing sessions - some babies are "snackers" and take a long time to eat because they eat for 2 mintues, sleep for 10, eat for 2, sleep for 10, etc... there are ways to encourage them to be more effective. But most babies will take short breaks while nursing
  • growth spurts - first one around 10-14 days, then around 4-6 weeks, 3 months, etc... Lasts 1-2 days, baby will act like they are starving, you will feel empty. Keep putting baby to breast!!
  • nipple discomfort (pain you should always ask for help) in the early days
  • tingling, or sometimes painful feeling that radiates from shoulder to nipple. That's your "let-down" reflex

NOT NORMAL/TIME TO SEEK HELP
  • baby continues to be very sleepy/lethargic after the first few days
  • taking more than 45-60 minutes to be satisfied every time (a session like that once a day or so is normal)
  • making a clicking sounds or very sloppy during feedings - could be indicative of tongue tie
  • less than about 6 wet diapers per day after the first week, less than 3 poopy diapers per day (or if the poop does not turn yellow by the end of the first week)
  • painful latching - particularly if it continues past the initial latch, any damaged nipples (cracks, bleeding)
  • not being able to get ANY milk - not even droplets after the first few days
  • extreme engorgement - Some of the experts in the field claim you can avoid it altogether by ensuring baby is nursing WELL and frequently in the early days. If you are engorged so bad baby can't eat, get help!


Consider our biological design:
We are designed to consume breastmilk. It's an amazing system if you delve into the details! Breast isn't the "best" food, it's the biologically normal food.
Babies know only what we expose them to. Their instinct drives them to find the breast even if the mother is unable to assist (look up videos of the "breast crawl"). Their sense of smell is phenomenal. There have been some cool experiments done to test how well they can smell their mother's milk.
We are meant to be close to an adult at all times. A baby left unattended would be eaten by a predator in our early days.
Most aboriginal tribes practice some form of baby wearing and babies nurse frequently. Normal for them is usually eating a couple minutes every half hour or so. The theory is that's what our bodies are meant to do. They also generally breastfeed for 4 years or longer. That's one of the reasons baby teeth are also referred to as "milk teeth".
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Last edited by Kelllilee; April 19th, 2013 at 09:47 AM.
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  #25  
April 19th, 2013, 10:25 AM
MissCiara's Avatar It's A Girl!
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For those of you who have time to read there's a great book out called "The Complete Book Of Breastfeeding". Very informative!
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  #26  
April 19th, 2013, 11:00 AM
carolinashore's Avatar Veteran
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I didn't BF my first...my second we got off to a pretty good start. He latched well, but I had the hardest time keeping him awake. He would fall asleep pretty quickly, and we weren't able to wake him to continue feeding. He started to jaundice, and the nurse had us give him formula. He ended up under the lights for 24 hours, and during this time he became so frantic about feeding, that he refused the breast and would only take a bottle.
So I'm wondering what I can do different if this one is a sleepy feeder also? We tried the wet wash cloth, tickling, etc. my nurse at the time was 0 help, she was very rude about it instead.
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  #27  
April 19th, 2013, 11:16 AM
Kelllilee's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Naked breastfeeding can help stimulate a sleepy baby (baby can still wear a diaper), upright positioning, being sure baby is latched well and actually swallowing, not just comfort nursing, express some milk and feed it with a tube at the breast or with finger feeding (sometimes the sleepiness is due to lack of nutrients, sometimes it's just normal for that baby - I've seen babies who nurse only every 4-6 hours for the first 24-48 hours and then perk up and start nursing more frequently). Some babies are just quick nursers and 5-10 minute feedings are normal. It's hard to tell without someone who knows what to look for watching. My first was that way. The nurses tried to force me to give her formula because 10 minutes was "obviously" not long enough... I've yet to have a kid who nursed longer than that EVER. They are just quick and efficient. Oh, and breast compressions can help keep them nursing longer! http://breastfeedinginc.ca/content.p...me=vid-4dayold
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Last edited by Kelllilee; April 19th, 2013 at 11:20 AM.
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  #28  
April 19th, 2013, 11:40 AM
Hesperleigh's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I am so excited and nervous to try this second time around! Thanks for answering all these questions. I was told I had to supplement after the first few days with Haeden and then after that he would go right to sleep when I tried to breastfeed. I tried to pump and could hardly get anything (thought I had a manual and it was very painful). I finally gave up after a few weeks.

I'm most nervous about bfing this second time around because I want to establish a good bfing relationship, but also a good bottle one because I go back to work after 8 weeks and she'll be taking a bottle between the hours of 8 -5.
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  #29  
April 19th, 2013, 11:43 AM
Kelllilee's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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If it started after beginning to supplement with the bottle I would guess it was likely because he didn't want to "work" at breastfeeding. With the bottle the milk is readily available and they don't have to do much but swallow. Some babies will really take to that and stop working at getting the milk flowing at the breast or suck only long enough to be comforted and fall asleep. one of the many reasons I strongly encourage no bottles in the beginning.
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  #30  
April 19th, 2013, 12:12 PM
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What are the best bottles to use at first, if wanting to do an occasional bottle? We were thinking of going with the Tommee Tippee slow flows?
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  #31  
April 19th, 2013, 12:28 PM
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CarolinaShore- A great way to feed a sleepy nurser is the side-lying position. It is my favorite newborn nursing position bc you can easily position their floppy heads and see how they are latching on better that way. Plus I hate sitting up and nursing every feeding. I always pump for five minutes after they nurse and finger feed or bottle feed them what I pump in those early days after delivery. Well fed babies nurse and sleep better What is important is that you nurse then pump for 5minutes every three hours especially for the first two weeks if you want to establish an adequate milk supply you have to empty your breast every three hours so it will make more!

Pumping is like homework- It's ALOT of extra work in those first days after delivery! But for me is essential for great nursing down the line especially if you are going back to work afterword,you cannot skip this part. I am a retired flight attendant and went back to work after three of my children. Having a real hospital grade pump is a MUST if you want to successfully breastfeed and work away from home. I do own a Medela Pump in Style that I use for occasional pumping needs after baby is one yr old but before then it's hospital grade Medela. Breastfeeding and working from home is like having two full time jobs IMHO and isn't easy. Pumping and getting good enough at it to have a great milk supply is MAJOR work but IT CAN BE DONE. If I could share with you all the places I've pumped, airplane lavatories, jetways, regular old airport bathroom with people coming and going. In the old days they didn't have to provide you a special place to nurse like today... I would love to be an encouragement to anyone trying because we all need it especially in those early weeks after they are born
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  #32  
April 19th, 2013, 12:28 PM
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CarolinaShore- A great way to feed a sleepy nurser is the side-lying position. It is my favorite newborn nursing position bc you can easily position their floppy heads and see how they are latching on better that way. Plus I hate sitting up and nursing every feeding. I always pump for five minutes after they nurse and finger feed or bottle feed them what I pump in those early days after delivery. Well fed babies nurse and sleep better What is important is that you nurse then pump for 5minutes every three hours especially for the first two weeks if you want to establish an adequate milk supply you have to empty your breast every three hours so it will make more!

Pumping is like homework- It's ALOT of extra work in those first days after delivery! But for me is essential for great nursing down the line especially if you are going back to work afterword,you cannot skip this part. I am a retired flight attendant and went back to work after three of my children. Having a real hospital grade pump is a MUST if you want to successfully breastfeed and work away from home. I do own a Medela Pump in Style that I use for occasional pumping needs after baby is one yr old but before then it's hospital grade Medela. Breastfeeding and working from home is like having two full time jobs IMHO and isn't easy. Pumping and getting good enough at it to have a great milk supply is MAJOR work but IT CAN BE DONE. If I could share with you all the places I've pumped, airplane lavatories, jetways, regular old airport bathroom with people coming and going. In the old days they didn't have to provide you a special place to nurse like today... I would love to be an encouragement to anyone trying because we all need it especially in those early weeks after they are born
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  #33  
April 19th, 2013, 12:39 PM
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I also have my own digital scales and weigh once a day every day at home for the first six weeks. I think it cost around sixty dollars.

I also like the supplemental finger feeder,especially if you have a baby that comes out sucking on their tongue,this can really help train them to keep their tongue down and learn to latch on better. For my two who wouldn't take a pacifier they just liked to suck on one of my fingers and eventually they taught themselves to suck on their own thumbs.
I think there is something so precious about thumb sucking when they are teeny tiny!
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  #34  
April 19th, 2013, 12:39 PM
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I also have my own digital scales and weigh once a day every day at home for the first six weeks. I think it cost around sixty dollars.

I also like the supplemental finger feeder,especially if you have a baby that comes out sucking on their tongue,this can really help train them to keep their tongue down and learn to latch on better. For my two who wouldn't take a pacifier they just liked to suck on one of my fingers and eventually they taught themselves to suck on their own thumbs.
I think there is something so precious about thumb sucking when they are teeny tiny!
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  #35  
April 19th, 2013, 12:42 PM
Kelllilee's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamalamb View Post
What are the best bottles to use at first, if wanting to do an occasional bottle? We were thinking of going with the Tommee Tippee slow flows?
You definitely want slow flow, but it's hard to say what's the "best" one. Wide mouth tends to mimic the shape of the breast more, but it still is a different mechanism so there's not a huge difference between different bottles. The Breastflow bottle is probably the most similar to breastfeeding. Some babies are really picky, so probably don't go out and buy 10 of the same thing, you may find baby won't take that one at all and you've wasted your money.
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  #36  
April 19th, 2013, 03:40 PM
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I'm loving all this great breastfeeding advice! It makes me look forward to nursing this little one, mixed in with a bit of dread thinking about how much hard work it is at the beginning.

I don't know that I have anything to say that hasn't already been said, but just to reaffirm the things I found particularly true:

It's hard work at first for sure, but it's worth it.

I always have heard people say that if you have a good latch, it shouldn't hurt, and my first definitely had latch issues. But, even my second who was a good nurser from the start caused me pain. When people talk about it causing discomfort in the first minute or so of a feeding, my experience is that minute hurts like hell (sort of like how nurses will say that a shot feels like a pinch when it really hurts). And most other mom's I know in real life would say the same thing. I know blisters, bleeding and major cracking are a problem, but I've not been able to avoid some degree of soreness, cracking and pain as my nipples adjusted to being sucked on for hours every day. I mean, that's a lot of attention!

If you feel like you need help, don't hesitate to ask for help. I'd also recommend finding a good lactation consultant even before you need one, just so you know who to call if you need it. If you do, you'll be emotional and desperate... not the time you want to be scouring the internet for phone numbers. I'd recommend someone who is IBCLC certified. I know plenty of doctors personally and they don't learn in depth about breast feeding, so their advice ranks rather low on my list. And in my experience, L&D nurses are hit or miss as far as the value of their advice. It has seemed like some of them are just giving advice from their own experience (which could be great), or from a basic course. If you are desperate, you need someone who's business is lactation and only lactation! And after having a lot of difficulty with my first, there's no desperation quite like the desperation caused by an exhausted new mom and a hungry baby.

Other resources:
The Nursing Mother's Companion (someone else referenced it above)
www.kellymom.com (awesome advice on just about every subject related to breastfeeding)

My milk came in around day 3-4 with my first, and day 2 with my second. But like others have said, you need to start nursing right away so your baby can get all that good colostrum and to establish your milk supply.

I have it found it easiest to pump after the first feeding in the morning. In my experience, pumping is kind of a skill. I stopped pumping with my second after a few months and then just sort of lost the ability to produce anything when I pumped (even though I had plenty of milk there, I just couldn't get a let down with this impersonal machine). I think different people have a wide range of their ability to pump well, that has nothing to do with how well they are producing milk.

We have always eventually used gumdrop pacifiers.
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  #37  
April 20th, 2013, 06:01 PM
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Just a few things from my experience. Ive nursed three babies.

Baby #1: Terrible pain for 6 weeks when latched (looking back he obviously wasn't latching right, but I didn't know)

Jaundiced so pedi pushed formula....I supplemented bottles of formula after nursing...( looking back I was completely going against building supply)

At three months I felt like it was pointless to be BFing bc I was supplementing after every single feeding so I quit.

Baby #2: I learned a few things since last time.
Jaundiced but I didn't give formula I just basically wore her and nursed her all the time. It was a pain but totally worth it. She was on a light at home for 14 days due to the jaundice.

She had a great latch, but I still had blistered nipples, but it went away on its own and wasn't terribly painful.

I started taking Fenugreek when I got home from the hospital and it really helped my supply. I nursed her for 10 months because she self weaned due to early walking and too busy to lay back and nurse.

Baby #3: Great nurser. He too was jaundiced but I didn't supplement. I wore him constantly and nursed on demand. He was on a light for 15 days (wretched tied down feeling). I took fenugreek when I felt my supply was low.

Baby #3 was a completely natural delivery while my other two were inductions. What I noticed was that my milk came in a whole day sooner with baby #3! HTH someone
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