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  • 2 Post By juleeannk
  • 3 Post By TaraJo29
  • 1 Post By juleeannk

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  #1  
June 16th, 2013, 08:21 PM
Dolly Lama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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My last attempt at BFing was a complete and total failure, so I'm trying to prepare in advance to increase my chances of success this time. The problem last time was the pain! I mean, toe-curling, wincing, wanting to cry pain. According to the LC I did have a proper latch, so that wasn't the problem; I think it's more that I have sensitive nipples or something like that.

What is the best cream on the market to soothe sore nipples? Do nipple shields help with the pain at all? Are there any other products out there to make this easier? How about the breast pump - Is it better to buy or rent one from the hospital?

Thanks!
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  #2  
June 16th, 2013, 09:46 PM
Heidijens1's Avatar Super Mommy
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Lanolin ointment seemed to really help with my baby that made me sore.For me it was wonderful and worked really well. I just had to make sure to reapply every time she nursed.. Also making sure that you are holding baby in a good position and has a good latch is helpful. I really don't think that nipple sheilds with help much is there isn't a need for them other then being sore.
I never used a pump so I can't really say if you should rent or buy one.
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  #3  
June 17th, 2013, 06:14 AM
MyFantasticFour's Avatar Mommy of 4
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I never really used a pump and trying to pump in the beginning with my first really messed me all up and I didn't breastfeed her for long. With my other two I strictly put them on the breast every time and then I used a manual pump from time to time for small feedings I could let my oldest or husband do but I know most people tell me they prefer electric. I've never liked the electric ones, personally.
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  #4  
June 17th, 2013, 06:48 AM
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expressing somebreast milk after nursing and rubbing it in is really helpful. the breastmilk itself has some soothign qualities.
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  #5  
June 17th, 2013, 08:12 AM
jensma's Avatar Katie: mommy to Ty & Em
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nipple shields are a tricky thing. i think its better to bite the bullet and fight the pain if you can as they can cause latch issues, for others they fix latch issues, you just never know. the bottom line is for most people breastfeeding HURTS. Your lactation consultant in the hospital can help. mine gave me some shells that i put over my nipples to keep them off of my skin for the first few days. i like lanolin and nursing pads too for initial rubbing. also letting milk/colostrum dry on your nips will help with cracking/rawness.

also find a nursing bra that is comfy. i know a lot of people swear by the nursing tanks target makes. i may grab a couple of those this time.

i pumped with my first and that helped alleviate
the pain with overproduction and gave me a break from baby sucking but with my daughter i chose not to and in the end that worked out better for me. its all about what works for you we'll be here when baBY gets here if you have any problems

also i prefer medelas lanolin, but i did find it was greasier so when i used it i covered it with a pad. i have heard gel pads are amazing for breastfeeding too. i've never used them myself. my first the pain was so bad i literally dreaded feedings. he was a cluster feeder so he'd be on me for hours at a time...it was just too much. i sucked it up and did it but i hated it for a while.
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  #6  
June 17th, 2013, 08:24 AM
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Obviously no BTDT, but wanted to follow this thread for ideas for me too.
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  #7  
June 17th, 2013, 09:34 AM
juleeannk's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Nipple shields should only be used if you are being followed closely by a lactation consultant. As a lactation consultant, I love them but they need to be used cautiously. They can help babies in need to get a better latch. They can also save a breastfeeding relationship if a mom is going to quit because it's too painful. If you do use one, you need to have the baby monitored for weight gain and will have to follow up with pumping to ensure adequate stimulation. But, I would encourage you to get to the root of the pain. What is causing it? Find a really good lactation consultant to help. If the latch was correct with your first baby, it is very likely that it could have been a lip or tongue tie. Seek help as soon as you are having problems and try not to let it get to the point where it's so painful. As for the breast pump, it depends on your situation. Will you be going to work or staying home? Will you be using it occasionally? Do you have insurance? If so what do they cover? Some insurance companies cover personal double electric pumps, some cover hospital grade rentals, and some only cover manual pumps. I bill insurance claims for my pumps so I am familiar with BCBS, UHC, Aetna, and several other small ones so if you have any other questions please feel free to ask.
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  #8  
June 17th, 2013, 09:44 AM
TaraJo29's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Good for you for trying again! I have nursed 5 babies and have been nursing for about a decade total, so I have a little experience.

First off, that's great that you had a good latch last time. People will sometimes tell you that it shouldn't hurt if the latch is good. But as you know, sometimes it WILL hurt (bad) even with a good latch. I think this is very common, but ladies will often conclude that something is still wrong with their baby's latch since it *still* hurts. I think the truth of the matter is, not all n*pples are the same, not all pain tolerances are the same, and babies suck HARD... If a baby was sucking on your finger as much as they nurse your finger would be killing (and likely be purple) by the end of the day! The suction is just that strong. So don't feel bad that you are on who has a lot of pain at first. Hopefully this time will be a little bit better since your n*pples will be a bit more worn in from your go at it last time. (BTW, with my first is when I had major pain and after that all the other kids were painless or near painless when we started nursing. It's getting nursing established that first time that is so rough.)

Things you can do:

Do not pump unless you *really* have to. As much as it may hurt to nurse the baby, pumps usually make it worse and can break open already damaged n*pples. The baby sucks really hard, but is gentler and nurses the way your n*pples are meant to be used. The baby is also much more efficient at getting the milk out because of the way his/her tongue moves, etc. So another problem with an inexperienced BFing mom using a pump is that they will often get paranoid and upset about how little milk they can pump. But since the baby is much more efficient at removing milk because of the way the baby nurses, *plus* your hormone reaction to nursing your baby and not the pump, how much milk you can pump is NOT a good indicator of how much milk you are producing or how much milk your baby is getting. The two can be very different because we are simply not meant to be pumped. We are meant to nurse babies. If you need to express a little milk just to relieve the pressure and help baby get ahold of the n*pple, express the milk by hand... not with a pump. And don't express any more than necessary or you will be prolonging your engorgement.

Use Lansinoh Lanolin cream for your nipples. It's OK for the baby get get it in his/her mouth so you don't have to worry about that. I wouldn't put anything on your nipples that is not safe for them to get in their mouth because you will probably be nursing so frequently. The Lansinoh can really help with bleeding and cracking so I highly recommend it.

Get a huge, comfortable, supportive bra for when your milk comes in. Usually ladies will go up 2 cup sizes in that first week. (I go from C to DD or E!!). I'm sure you know that usually you will get enormous and probably unable to wear your normal nursing bra. Scope out the stores in your area and know where you are going to send dh to get another gigunda nursing bra if you need one. LOL B**b size can be really frustrating in the first month when they start out huge, get a little less huge, but you still can't wear your normal bra and you find you need to go somewhere. You can either have them on hand beforehand or plan on having to make a bra run. And make sure you're never wearing a bra that is too tight or dents in your b**bs at ALL (you don't want to get a plugged duct or mastitis).

Nurse the baby on demand as much as he/she wants. Though painful, this will help regulate your milk supply so that your body knows how much it *really* needs (hint to b**bs: not 10 gallons a day). And if you can keep them from getting terribly hard, it is easier for the baby to get a good latch when nursing which means less pain.

Prepare yourself mentally for the worst: a lot of pain. Prepare yourself that if you want to do this you will make it through and it may hurt like heck and make you want to gasp every time the baby latches on and you will have to train yourself to relax, but you will get through it. If you set your mind on getting through that difficult stage, you will be so happy one day when you realize your baby is nursing happily and you feel... fine!

It will probably just take some serious mental endurance for you to get through that difficult stage (which may not be as bad this time) until your nipples can really heal and you can nurse comfortably. And stay away from the pump.

Hope it works out for you! I love nursing my babies. It's such a sweet relationship after you get the hang of it.
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Last edited by TaraJo29; June 17th, 2013 at 09:50 AM.
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  #9  
June 17th, 2013, 10:42 AM
321abc
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I didn't take the time to read the other responses but I just want to say that my first baby latched on perfectly the first try but it hurt horribly for the first couple of weeks anyway. I used lanolin.
If you can get through the first two weeks it's smooth sailing from then on! (Usually) I ended up with clogged ducts and mastitis but that doesn't happen often!!
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  #10  
June 17th, 2013, 12:26 PM
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Tarajo29, I love love love your response. I could not have said it better. I do not have nearly the experience as Tara. But I did struggle through terrible terrible pain the first couple of weeks, that made me gasp and wince and shed tears even...She was a cluster feeder too..to top it off my mom who was well intentioned and was a tremendous help was not thoughtful in her words and comments about my breast feeding. She would keep saying things like...'it can't really hurt that much!' or 'your supply is like nothing compared to how mine was ....really you should eat more' ( She would say this when I would say something abt how my breast pads are not able to contain leakage and it looked like I was producing too much!) Well I somehow managed to breast feed my daughter until she was abt 6 months old after which I started supplementing with formula. I wish I hadn't done that and trusted myself and my body enough to continue breast feeding till much later But I am glad she got my milk for 6 months at least.

So ditto abt the lactation consultant to get reassurance that the latch is proper, ditto abt the lansinoh everytime and as often as needed, ditto about biting the bullet and getting through the pain believing that one day it will get better!( It definitely does), ditto about feeding on demand at least the first few weeks - to hell with the schedule charts and hospital advice. Just make sure baby has wet & poopy diapers and you will do fine.
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  #11  
June 17th, 2013, 05:43 PM
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I just wanted to add that I also had a very difficult time with my DS. I was extremely sore for weeks but the gel pads were a lifesaver! They would heal me overnight and is the only thing that kept me going. They are expensive, but worth the price!
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  #12  
June 17th, 2013, 05:57 PM
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I had to use a Nipple shield and pump after feedings because DS was premature and wasn't able to latch properly yet. I was given a nipple shield by the head lactation consultant in the NICU after 4 days of trying to get DS to latch and nurse. The pumping was because as mentioned before, you have to be really carefull when using a nipple shield as it can increas your changes of mastitus and clogged ducts. I rubbed my own milk and lansinoh cream (or the medela lanolin cream) on my nipples after EVERY feeding/pumping session. I never really had alot of pain and I htink this is because of the shield. I only felt pain was when I tried to pump after not pumping for like 3 months much later.

The nipple shield is good in that regard, but if you use it a) you have to pump after every feeding and b) your baby gets use to nursing with it..and you have to eventually wean them from it.

I eventually weaned DS from the shield when he was about 5 weeks old (close to his actual due date) and successfully nursed him untill he was 10 months.
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  #13  
June 18th, 2013, 02:40 PM
Dolly Lama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
I bill insurance claims for my pumps so I am familiar with BCBS, UHC, Aetna, and several other small ones so if you have any other questions please feel free to ask.
I have BC/BS PPO...Do you know off hand what they would cover?

This has been an awesome thread - thank you to all who chimed in! I'm going to dive into this with cream, gel pads, and every other thing that's being recommended to increase my chances of being successful this time...As a matter of fact, I'm feeling a little more confident because I'm preparing in advance, and now have access to experienced moms who don't mind sharing their expertise.
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  #14  
June 19th, 2013, 06:54 AM
juleeannk's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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It's been pretty typical for BCBS to cover 100% for personal double electric pumps in network and it's split 50/50 with out of network covering either 100% or 70%. The problem with in network claims has been not being able to find an in network supplier as all insurance companies are not allowing new suppliers and the original suppliers have no pumps or pumps that are cheap and don't work well. For moms that are staying home with their babies, that's not a real issue if they don't have a good quality pump, but for moms who are returning to work, they need a better quality pump so most are opting to do the out of network claims. The only way for you to know what they cover for your plan is to you call or have someone like me call which is something I can do if you would like. If you would, you can email me your information to julee.southeastmms@gmail.com
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  #15  
June 19th, 2013, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juleeannk View Post
It's been pretty typical for BCBS to cover 100% for personal double electric pumps in network and it's split 50/50 with out of network covering either 100% or 70%. The problem with in network claims has been not being able to find an in network supplier as all insurance companies are not allowing new suppliers and the original suppliers have no pumps or pumps that are cheap and don't work well. For moms that are staying home with their babies, that's not a real issue if they don't have a good quality pump, but for moms who are returning to work, they need a better quality pump so most are opting to do the out of network claims. The only way for you to know what they cover for your plan is to you call or have someone like me call which is something I can do if you would like. If you would, you can email me your information to julee.southeastmms@gmail.com

Julee, I have been looking into this. I live in Indiana and have UHC. They say they cover 100% for a breast pump from an in network DMS (Durable medical supplies) provider. I called UHC and they gave me the contact info of three companies Byram Healthcare, Edgepark & Genadyne. I researched/contacted all of them and it looks like two of them have Medela Advanced double electric which is basically the motor of the PISA without all the frills. However, I am very particular about getting a Medela PISA with the bag, coolers, the let down feature etc. I am going to be working full time and I need the top of the line brand!! I started out calling all the other in-network DMS providers in my area listed on the UHC website...(called 2 so far) and no luck yet with the Medela PISa...they all carry other brands. Any ideas on the easiest way to find who near me would carry the Medela PISA?

PS: Dolly, didn't mean to derail thread sorry!
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  #16  
June 19th, 2013, 11:14 AM
juleeannk's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anitha View Post
Julee, I have been looking into this. I live in Indiana and have UHC. They say they cover 100% for a breast pump from an in network DMS (Durable medical supplies) provider. I called UHC and they gave me the contact info of three companies Byram Healthcare, Edgepark & Genadyne. I researched/contacted all of them and it looks like two of them have Medela Advanced double electric which is basically the motor of the PISA without all the frills. However, I am very particular about getting a Medela PISA with the bag, coolers, the let down feature etc. I am going to be working full time and I need the top of the line brand!! I started out calling all the other in-network DMS providers in my area listed on the UHC website...(called 2 so far) and no luck yet with the Medela PISa...they all carry other brands. Any ideas on the easiest way to find who near me would carry the Medela PISA?

PS: Dolly, didn't mean to derail thread sorry!
I would suggest you call them and tell them that you called (insert # of providers called) in network providers and none of them had pumps that you will need for a mom who is returning to work. Stress to them that you need a certain kind of pump to maintain a milk supply when away from your baby and ask for a Gap extension which will allow an out of network provider to temporarily become in network. UHC is one of the few insurance companies who do this. This will allow you to find a provider who can bill insurance that sells what you want. As far as that particular pump, I am not sure where you can find a DME who has it and who also bills insurance. I carry all Hygeia so I am not sure of who in your area can bill insurance with that particular pump. If you are granted a Gap extension, you can go out of state too. We ship out of state all the time with gap extensions. If they need a letter as to why it's important to have a certain type of pump for this situation, I am willing to write one for you. I want insurance companies to change their policies!
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