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Breastfeeding and pumping


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  • 1 Post By Leanne78
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  #1  
August 1st, 2012, 03:44 PM
Derby Girl's Avatar Veteran
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Redlands, CA (SO CAL)
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OK, so I plan on breastfeeding, well using my breast milk exclusively. I also pumped with my son so I could go back to work. I found it really hard getting enough milk to feed him and stock pile. How do you ladies do it? I'd like to breastfeed, but Im also going to pump so my son and husband can share the experience while I get some sleep. My worries are that I will not produce enough milk to breastfeed and pump bottles in advance, especially when I go back to work. It's been 10 years since my son was born so I feel like a comeplete newbie again. If I remember correctly if you don't pump/feed every couple of hours your milk supply diminishes. So what if I send hubby for a 3 am feeding and sleep without pumping? Will I lose my supply that fast? I am so confused!
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  #2  
August 1st, 2012, 05:50 PM
*Izzy's*Mommy*'s Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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The more you pump/nurse, the more milk you'll produce. So even if your hubby does a bottle feeding, I'd still get up to pump some milk. I ended up hardly pumping because it took so much longer to do. It was so much easier to just take the baby to bed with me and we'd just fall asleep while she was eating.

I used to just pump as it was needed. So if I knew I was going somewhere on a particular day, I'd make sure I had a bottle or two ready to go.

You really want to establish your milk supply early on. So, I wouldn't miss more than one feeding a day. Once your milk supply is well established, then you can pump more and feel better about missing a feeding now and then.

Based on how often you pump/nurse, your body will take that as a cue on how much milk you need to produce. I would set my alarm sometimes just to pump a bottle that was needed and it would also help me not be so engorged in the morning.
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  #3  
August 1st, 2012, 06:31 PM
meddleman's Avatar Loving my girls!!!!
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Breastfeeding is supply and demand...what your baby takes/you pump, you will replenish. If you give your baby a bottle of formula or breast milk and don't pump, that is an amount your body doesn't know to produce, so it won't. After establishing nursing, I would maybe pump after a morning feeding when you naturally have a higher supply to start building up a stash. Are you able to pump at work?
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  #4  
August 1st, 2012, 06:31 PM
Leanne78's Avatar Nov 2012 DDC Co-Host
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When I was first building my supply, I was pumping every 2-3 hours around the clock. It was rough, but eventually I built up a huge supply and I only had to pump 4 times a day after that and never at night. I'm not looking forward to the early days though (after I'm done breastfeeding) when I have to pump a lot to get things going. I also drank mother's milk tea, took Fenugreek and Blessed Thistle to help build up my supply. I really think the suppliments helped.
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  #5  
August 1st, 2012, 08:27 PM
Cocoa Sashimi's Avatar Usually Lurking
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When I first established my supply, I would nurse my son in the NICU and turn around and pump immediately afterwards since he was not consuming a lot. I did that every two hours around the clock on the advice of one of the NICU nurses. I was a zombie, but it was well worth it. I had a very large surplus in the deep freeze.

DH gave our son bottles of breast milk but not during the late night/early morning feedings because prolactin (milk-making hormone) levels peak in the early hours of the morning. Nursing frequently at night lets you take advantage of the higher levels of prolactin to help stimulate your supply. Even when he was giving our son a bottle, I was attached to the pump.

KellyMom is a good site for all things breastfeeding along with joining your local La Leche League and taking advantage of the lactation consultant at the hospital.
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  #6  
August 1st, 2012, 08:42 PM
meddleman's Avatar Loving my girls!!!!
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LOVE Kellymom.com!!!!!!
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  #7  
August 1st, 2012, 08:56 PM
white.house's Avatar Kelli
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I pumped during (on the opposite side) and after (on the side he nursed on) when we were establishing milk supply early on. Like the others said, it's all about supply and demand so early on I would recommend you don't miss many feedings. Like Amber mentioned Fenugreek and Blessed Thistle and anything with lots of oatmeal will also help you build up supply.
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  #8  
August 2nd, 2012, 12:40 PM
Glycerin19's Avatar Mindful Mama
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I do agree that it's about supply and demand, but I experienced something different when I tried to pump. I desensitized to the pump and could get nothing, not even drips. Yet if there is a baby at my breast I am totally fine.

With my son, I was working and I was able to pump for about 5 months before I began to have problems. Even before then getting enough out was hard and we supplement eventually but he was also starting to eat solids too. By 9 months old (I had a 3 month maternity leave) I could no longer pump a single drop. However we still nursed until he self-weaned at 2.5yo.

Both of my next two pregnancies I tried to pump just to see what would happen. I wasn't working and it wasn't necessary, but I thought if I could build up a supply I could get a free evening here and there. But no. I had a the really good Medela pump too. I ended up giving it away. I nursed both of my girls for over 3 years. So I know it's not a supply issue for me. I just do not like a machine at my breast.

My point in all of this is to say that you shouldn't think that if you can't pump that you have no supply! I see a lot of women fall into that thinking but it's not always true. If your baby is nursing fine, it's not your supply and pumping may just not be working for you.
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  #9  
August 2nd, 2012, 02:06 PM
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I EP'd my first faughter starting at six weeks. I found some online groups and information that all said you should really pump every 2-3 hours until your supply is well established. Eventually I got lazy and didn't pump during the night, but that really hurt my supply over the long run. I second checking out kellimom.com.... Tons of helpful info.
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  #10  
August 2nd, 2012, 04:19 PM
meddleman's Avatar Loving my girls!!!!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glycerin19 View Post
I do agree that it's about supply and demand, but I experienced something different when I tried to pump. I desensitized to the pump and could get nothing, not even drips. Yet if there is a baby at my breast I am totally fine.

With my son, I was working and I was able to pump for about 5 months before I began to have problems. Even before then getting enough out was hard and we supplement eventually but he was also starting to eat solids too. By 9 months old (I had a 3 month maternity leave) I could no longer pump a single drop. However we still nursed until he self-weaned at 2.5yo.

Both of my next two pregnancies I tried to pump just to see what would happen. I wasn't working and it wasn't necessary, but I thought if I could build up a supply I could get a free evening here and there. But no. I had a the really good Medela pump too. I ended up giving it away. I nursed both of my girls for over 3 years. So I know it's not a supply issue for me. I just do not like a machine at my breast.

My point in all of this is to say that you shouldn't think that if you can't pump that you have no supply! I see a lot of women fall into that thinking but it's not always true. If your baby is nursing fine, it's not your supply and pumping may just not be working for you.
This is VERY true. Any pump will never get out as much as a baby will. That's why seeing how much you pump is never a good indicator of your actual supply. And some people don't respond to the pump at all!
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