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Your Baby Weeks 14-40 (Info) ** ##links for pregnancy and 2 trimester Info post 2##


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  #1  
July 23rd, 2013, 01:22 PM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,847
Thought this might be helpful for us!!
Had some one do it in my last DDC and
it was cool, I will add to it as we get farther along!!

Your baby First Trimester/ Second Trimester, weeks 14 through 40




Week 14

This week's big developments: Your baby can now squint, frown, grimace,
pee, and possibly suck his thumb! Thanks to brain impulses, his facial
muscles are getting a workout as his tiny features form one expression
after another. His kidneys are producing urine, which he releases into the
amniotic fluid around him — a process he'll keep up until birth. He can
grasp, too, and if you're having an ultrasound now, you may even catch
him sucking his thumb.
In other news: Your baby's stretching out. From head to bottom, he
measures 3 1/2 inches — about the size of a lemon — and he weighs
1 1/2 ounces. His body's growing faster than his head, which now sits
upon a more distinct neck. By the end of this week, his arms will have
grown to a length that's in proportion to the rest of his body. (His legs
still have some lengthening to do.) He's starting to develop an
ultra-fine, downy covering of hair, called lanugo, all over his body.
Your baby's liver starts making bile this week — a sign that it's doing
its job right — and his spleen starts helping in the production of red
blood cells. Though you can't feel his tiny punches and kicks yet, your
little pugilist's hands and feet (which now measure about 1/2 inch long)
are more flexible and active.

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Week 15

Your growing baby now measures about 4 inches long, crown to rump,
and weighs in at about 2 1/2 ounces (about the size of an apple). She's
busy moving amniotic fluid through her nose and upper respiratory tract,
which helps the primitive air sacs in her lungs begin to develop. Her legs
are growing longer than her arms now, and she can move all of her joints
and limbs. Although her eyelids are still fused shut, she can sense light. If
you shine a flashlight at your tummy, for instance, she's likely to move
away from the beam. There's not much for your baby to taste at this point,
but she is forming taste buds. Finally, if you have an ultrasound this week,
you may be able to find out whether your baby's a boy or a girl! (Don't be
too disappointed if it remains a mystery, though. Nailing down your baby's
sex depends on the clarity of the picture and on your baby's position. He or
she may be modestly curled up or turned in such a way as to "hide the goods.")

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Week 16

Get ready for a growth spurt. In the next few weeks, your baby will double
his weight and add inches to his length. Right now, he's about the size of
an avocado: 4 1/2 inches long (head to rump) and 3 1/2 ounces. His legs
are much more developed, his head is more erect than it has been, and
his eyes have moved closer to the front of his head. His ears are close to
their final position, too. The patterning of his scalp has begun, though his
locks aren't recognizable yet. He's even started growing toenails. And
there's a lot happening inside as well. For example, his heart is now
pumping about 25 quarts of blood each day, and this amount will continue
to increase as your baby continues to develop.

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Week 17

Your baby's skeleton is changing from soft cartilage to bone, and the
umbilical cord — her lifeline to the placenta — is growing stronger and
thicker. Your baby weighs 5 ounces now (about as much as a turnip),
and she's around 5 inches long from head to bottom. She can move
her joints, and her sweat glands are starting to develop.

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Week 18

Head to rump, your baby is about 5 1/2 inches long, and he weighs
almost 7 ounces (about the size of a bell pepper). He's busy flexing
his arms and legs — movements that you'll start noticing more and
more in the weeks ahead. His blood vessels are visible through his
thin skin, and his ears are now in their final position, although they're
still standing out from his head a bit. A protective covering of myelin is
beginning to form around his nerves, a process that will continue for a
year after he's born. If you're having a girl, her uterus and fallopian
tubes are formed and in place. If you're having a boy, his genitals are
noticeable now, but he may hide them from you during an ultrasound.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Week 19

Your baby's sensory development is exploding! Her brain is designating specialized areas for smell, taste, hearing, vision, and touch. Some research suggests that she may be able to hear your voice now, so don't be shy about reading aloud, talking to her, or singing a happy tune if the mood strikes you.
Your baby weighs about 8 1/2 ounces and measures 6 inches, head to bottom — about the size of an heirloom tomato. Her arms and legs are in the right proportions to each other and the rest of her body now. Her kidneys continue to make urine and the hair on her scalp is sprouting. A waxy protective coating called the vernix caseosa is forming on her skin to prevent it from pickling in the amniotic fluid.

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Week 20

Your baby weighs about 10 1/2 ounces now. He's also around 6 1/2 inches long from head to bottom and about 10 inches from head to heel — about the size of a banana. (For the first 20 weeks, when a baby's legs are curled up against his torso and hard to measure, measurements are taken from the top of his head to his bottom — the "crown to rump" measurement. After 20 weeks, he's measured from head to toe.)
He's swallowing more these days, which is good practice for his digestive system. He's also producing meconium, a black, sticky by-product of digestion. This gooey substance will accumulate in his bowels, and you'll see it in his first soiled diaper (some babies pass meconium in the womb or during delivery).

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Week 21

Your baby now weighs about three-quarters of a pound and is approximately 10 1/2 inches long — about the size of a carrot. You may soon feel like she's practicing martial arts as her initial fluttering movements turn into full-fledged kicks and nudges. You may also discover a pattern to her activity as you get to know her better. In other developments, your baby's eyebrows and lids are present now, and if you're having a girl, her vagina has begun to form as well.

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Week 22

At 11 inches and almost 1 pound (about the size of a spaghetti squash), your baby is starting to look like a miniature newborn. His lips, eyelids, and eyebrows are becoming more distinct, and he's even developing tiny tooth buds beneath his gums. His eyes have formed, but his irises (the colored part of the eye) still lack pigment.
If you could see inside your womb, you'd be able to spot the fine hair (lanugo) that covers his body and the deep wrinkles on his skin, which he'll sport until he adds a padding of fat to fill them in. Inside his belly, his pancreas — essential for the production of some important hormones — is developing steadily.

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Week 23

Turn on the radio and sway to the music. With her sense of movement well developed by now, your baby can feel you dance. And now that she's more than 11 inches long and weighs just over a pound (about the size of a large mango), you may be able to see her squirm underneath your clothes. Blood vessels in her lungs are developing to prepare for breathing, and the sounds that your baby's increasingly keen ears pick up are preparing her for entry into the outside world. Loud noises that become familiar now — such as your dog barking or the roar of the vacuum cleaner — probably won't faze her when she hears them outside the womb.

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Week 24

Your baby's growing steadily, having gained about 4 ounces since last week. That puts him at about 1 1/3 pounds. Since he's almost a foot long (about the size of an ear of corn), he cuts a pretty lean figure at this point, but his body is filling out proportionally and he'll soon start to plump up. His brain is also growing quickly now, and his taste buds are continuing to develop. His lungs are developing "branches" of the respiratory "tree" as well as cells that produce surfactant, a substance that will help his air sacs inflate once he hits the outside world. His skin is still thin and translucent, but that will start to change soon.

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Week 25

Head to heels, your baby now measures about 13 1/2 inches. Her weight — 1 1/2 pounds — isn't much more than an average rutabaga, but she's beginning to exchange her long, lean look for some baby fat. As she does, her wrinkled skin will begin to smooth out and she'll start to look more and more like a newborn. She's also growing more hair — and if you could see it, you'd now be able to discern its color and texture.

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Week 26

The network of nerves in your baby's ears is better developed and more sensitive than before. He may now be able to hear both your voice and your partner's as you chat with each other. He's inhaling and exhaling small amounts of amniotic fluid, which is essential for the development of his lungs. These so-called breathing movements are also good practice for when he's born and takes that first gulp of air. And he's continuing to put on baby fat. He now weighs about 1 2/3 pounds and measures 14 inches (about the size of a scallion) from head to heel. If you're having a boy, his testicles are beginning to descend into his scrotum — a trip that will take about two to three days.

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Week 27

This week, your baby weighs almost 2 pounds (about the size of a head of cauliflower) and is about 14 1/2 inches long with her legs extended. She's sleeping and waking at regular intervals, opening and closing her eyes, and perhaps even sucking her fingers. With more brain tissue developing, your baby's brain is very active now. While her lungs are still immature, they would be capable of functioning — with a lot of medical help — if she were to be born now. Chalk up any tiny rhythmic movements you may be feeling to a case of baby hiccups, which may be common from now on. Each episode usually lasts only a few moments, and they don't bother her, so just relax and enjoy the tickle.

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28 Weeks


Your baby weighs a little more than 1kg and may measure up to 38cm from top to toe. At about this time, she can open her eyes and turn her head in your uterus (womb) if she notices a continuous, bright light shining from the outside. She's getting used to blinking her eyes, which now have eyelashes.

Her fat layers are continuing to form and her bones are nearly developed, though they are still soft and pliable. Her bones won’t harden properly until after she's born.

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29 Weeks


Your baby now weighs a little over 1kg and measures about 39cm from head to toe. On his head, hair is growing well. If you're having a boy, his testicles will have descended from near the kidneys through the groin en route to the scrotum. If your baby is a girl, her clitoris is prominent, because it's not yet covered by the still-small labia. These will grow to cover it in the last few weeks before birth.

Your baby's head is getting bigger to make room for his developing brain. Nearly all babies react to sound and light by the end of this week.

Your baby's nutritional needs reach their peak during the third trimester. You'll need plenty of protein, vitamin C, folic acid, iron, and calcium (about 200mg is deposited in your baby's skeleton every day), so eat foods rich in these nutrients. His skeleton hardens even more and his brain, muscles, and lungs are maturing all the time. Take a look at our eating well guide to make sure you are getting the right minerals and vitamins.

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30 Weeks


Your baby now measures a little more than 39cm from crown to toe. Her growth in terms of her length will soon slow down but she will continue to gain weight until she's born. She probably weighs about 1.3kg at this stage.

Your baby's lungs and digestive tract are almost fully developed. She continues to open and shut her eyes. She can probably see what's going on inside your uterus (womb), tell light from dark and even track a light source. If you shine a light on your stomach, your baby may move her head to follow the light or even reach out to touch the moving glow.

Some researchers think baring your stomach to light stimulates visual development. But your baby won't be able to see much when she's born. Newborns can see a distance of only between 20cm and 30cm. Children with normal vision don't reach 20/20 vision (the same as an adult) until the age of about eight. To complete the picture, your baby now has eyebrows and can bat her eyelashes!

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31 Weeks


Your baby weighs about 1.5kg and looks more than ever like a newborn. He measures about 41cm from crown to toe. His arms, legs and body continue to fill out – and they are finally proportional in size to his head.

You may notice your baby isn't moving around as much. That's because he's just running out of space in your uterus (womb). As long as you can feel him squirming and kicking, you'll know he's just fine. Believe it or not, he still has plenty of growing to do. You can expect him to gain at least 900g before birth.

Your baby's organs are continuing to mature and he is passing water from his bladder, which is good practice for the weeing he'll do after he's born. Also, the marrow in his bones has taken over from his liver the job of producing red blood cells.

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32 Weeks


Your baby now weighs about 1.7kg and is around 42cm long from head to toe. Although his lungs won't be fully developed until just before birth, your little one is busy inhaling amniotic fluid to exercise his lungs. From 32 weeks, babies born early have good chance of surviving and thriving. His skin is becoming soft and smooth as he plumps up in preparation for birth.

Some babies have a head of hair already, others have only a few wisps. Thick hair at birth doesn't necessarily mean thick hair later on. But children with fine hair in childhood also tend to have fine hair when they've grown up.

If your baby is a boy, his testicles should have descended from his abdomen into his scrotum. Sometimes, however, one or both testicles won't move into position until after birth. In two thirds of all baby boys who have undescended testicles at birth, the condition corrects itself by their first birthday.

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33 Weeks


Your baby now weighs about 2kg and measures up to 44cm from head to toe. She may already be getting ready for birth by turning upside-down. Her head should be pointing down, ready for her journey into the world.

Your doctor or midwife will be paying careful attention to your baby's position in the coming weeks. Some babies do decide to turn back round again.

Your baby's skull is still quite pliable. The plates of bone that make up her skull have not completely fused. This is so she can ease out of the relatively narrow birth canal, the passage between your cervix and the opening of your vagina. But the bones in the rest of her body are hardening. Your baby's skin is also gradually becoming less red and wrinkled as fat builds up underneath.

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34 Weeks


Your baby now weighs more than 2.2kg and is 45cm from top to toe. She's filling out and getting rounder – she’ll need her fat layers later to regulate her body temperature once she's born.

If you don't already talk to your baby, this is a good time to start – at 35 weeks her hearing is fully developed. Don't feel ridiculous if you're already chatting in baby talk. Some evidence shows that newborns pay closer attention to high-pitched tones.

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35 Weeks


Your baby now weighs about 2.4kg and measures around 46cm from head to toe. His elbows, feet or head may protrude from your stomach when he stretches and squirms about. Soon, as the wall of your uterus (womb) and your belly stretch thinner and let in more light, your baby will begin to develop daily activity cycles.

This week, your little one is sporting full-length fingernails and toenails and has a fully developed pair of kidneys. His liver can also process some waste products.

There's much less amniotic fluid and much more baby in your uterus. You've probably put on between 11kg and 13.6kg and your weight gain has hit its peak. Even your belly button has got bigger and has popped outward. You may be feeling breathless and get indigestion now that the top of your uterus is up under your ribs.

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36 Weeks


Your baby is still gaining weight – about 28g a day. She weighs nearly 2.7kg and is about 47cm long from head to toe. You may begin to feel an increased pressure in your lower belly and notice that your baby is gradually dropping. This is called lightening or engagement, and your lungs and stomach will finally get a chance to stretch out a little – breathing and eating should become easier.

However, walking may become increasingly uncomfortable. Some women say it feels as if their baby is going to fall out. Also, you may still feel as if you need to go to the loo all the time. Check out our eating well guide and stock up on those last-minute nutrients.

The good news is that by the end of this week, your pregnancy will be full-term and you could give birth any day. Babies between 37 weeks and 42 weeks are considered full-term. A baby born before 37 weeks is premature and after 42 weeks is post-term.

You may have noticed that your breasts are leaking a little. This is quite normal. They are producing the rich, first milk called colostrum that will give your baby a great start in life. If you feel like you're going into labor, your doctor or midwife will check to see if the neck of your womb (cervix) is starting to open. They'll look to see if your cervix is dilating, or widening, and effacing, or thinning.

Your midwife will be keeping an eye on what position your baby is in, to estimate how far your baby has dropped into your pelvis. This information will be entered into your maternity notes so that your midwife will know the position of your baby when you go into labor.

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37 Weeks


Your baby weighs close to 2.8kg and may be about 48.6cm long from head to toe. Your baby's head is now cradled in your pelvic cavity – surrounded and protected by your pelvic bones. This position clears some much-needed space for her growing legs and buttocks.

Many babies now have a full head of hair, with locks up to 3.5cm long. And then, of course, some babies don't have any hair at all. Speaking of hair, most of the downy coat of lanugo that covered your baby from 26 weeks has disappeared, and so has most of the vernix caseosa, the protective whitish substance that also covered her. Your baby will swallow her lanugo and exterior coating, along with other secretions, and store them in her bowels. These will become her first poo, a blackish waste called meconium.

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38 Weeks


If you don't know already, can you tell if you're carrying a boy or a girl? One hint may come from the size of your baby – boys tend to be slightly heavier than girls. Babies at week 39 weigh between 3kg and 3.2kg and continue to build the fat stores that will help regulate body temperature after birth.

Your baby's organ systems are fully developed and in place, but his lungs will be last to reach maturity. Even after your baby is born, it may take a few hours before he establishes a normal breathing pattern. After he's born, he'll have a series of brief tests which will measure his health on what's called the Apgar scale.

Wondering what color your baby's eyes will be? Most white European babies are born with dark blue eyes and their true eye color – be it brown, green, grey or blue – may not reveal itself for weeks or months. The color of your baby's eyes in the first minutes after birth won't last – exposure to light changes a baby's initial eye color. Most babies of African and Asian descent have dark grey or brown eyes at birth, but it won't be clear what precise shade their eyes will be until after the first six months or year.


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39 Weeks


It's all about watching and waiting now, as your baby could arrive any day. Your baby could be up to 50cm long, and weigh about 3kg. But that's only an average figure. As soon as your baby is born, your midwife will weigh him, and it's only then you'll know for sure how much he weighs.

Your baby is shedding the greasy, white substance (vernix caseosa) which has been protecting his skin. This turns the amniotic fluid, which was once clear, pale and milky. The outer layers of your baby's skin are also sloughing off as new skin forms underneath.

The hair on your baby's head may now be thick, and his fingernails extend beyond his fingertips. They may look long when he's born. Your baby's skull bones are not yet fused, which allows them to overlap as he passes through the birth canal during labor. This is the reason your baby's head may look cone-shaped after birth.

And if the week passes and there's still no baby? Try not to worry – babies have a habit of not arriving on their scheduled due date. Most doctors wait another two weeks before considering a pregnancy overdue.

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40 Weeks


After months of anticipation, your due date has been and gone, and... you're still pregnant. It's frustrating, but lots of women find themselves in this situation.

Rest assured your baby is quite cozy where she is. She is getting a little heavier and may grow a bit more in length. The average baby is about 51cm long from head to toe and weighs about 3.4kg at birth. But if your baby is anywhere between 2.5kg and 3.8kg, that's a healthy weight.

Your baby continues to shed the greasy, white substance (vernix caseosa) which has been protecting her skin. If she shows no sign of making an appearance after another week, she may have slightly dry skin when she arrives.

Your baby has mastered all the skills she'll need after she's born. She can instinctively search for her thumb and suck it, just as she will search for your breast for a feed soon after birth.

In TV dramas, labor always begins with the waters breaking – in the middle of a crowded room, of course – just before contractions start. The reality is that, even if your membranes do rupture, your baby's head will tend to act like a cork at the opening of your uterus (womb). If you lie down, however, you may notice fluid leaking. Your body will continue to produce amniotic fluid until your baby is born.

Try to stay calm if your waters break or you start to feel contractions, but do call your doctor or midwife straight away. You may be advised to wait at home until contractions are really under way.
__________________
Soy Iso Believer



Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014

Last edited by Offshoremama78; October 18th, 2013 at 07:44 PM. Reason: fixed type
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July 25th, 2013, 10:45 AM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Tucson, AZ
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I am starting this for a place to keep all links that may be helpful to us...
If you have any he you want stickied here, just most a link, I will add it...

medication categories.
Drugs in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding | SafeFetus.com
Over-the-Counter Meds That Are Safe to Take While Pregnant | Is It Safe During Pregnancy | Parents Connect



All days of pregnancy... All days of your pregnancy - How many weeks pregnant am I?


Here is some Info of what you might expect from Your Second Trimester

Second Trimester of Pregnancy
As you enter your second trimester of pregnancy, the morning sickness and fatigue that plagued you during the last three months should be fading, leaving you feeling more energetic and like your old self again.
The second trimester is, for many women, the easiest three months of pregnancy. Take the time now, while you're feeling better and your energy is up, to start planning for your baby's arrival.
During the second trimester, your baby is growing quickly. Between your 18th and 22nd week of pregnancy you'll have an ultrasound so your doctor can see how your baby is progressing. You also can learn the sex of your baby, unless you'd rather be surprised.
Although you should be feeling better now, big changes are still taking place inside your body. Here's what you can expect.
Changes in Your Body
Backache. The extra weight you've gained in the last few months is starting to put pressure on your back, making it achy and sore. To ease the pressure, sit up straight and use a chair that provides good back support. Sleep on your side with a pillow tucked between your legs. Avoid picking up or carrying anything heavy. Wear low-heeled, comfortable shoes with good arch support. If the pain is really uncomfortable, ask your partner to rub the sore spots, or treat yourself to a pregnancy massage.
Bleeding gums. About half of pregnant women develop swollen, tender gums. Hormone changes are sending more blood to your gums, making them more sensitive and causing them to bleed more easily. Your gums should go back to normal after your baby is born. In the meantime, use a softer toothbrush and be gentle when you floss, but don't skimp on dental hygiene. Studies show that pregnant women with gum disease (periodontal disease) may be more likely to go into premature labor and deliver a low-birth-weight baby.
Breast enlargement. Much of the breast tenderness you experienced during the first trimester should be wearing off, but your breasts are still growing as they prepare to feed your baby. Going up a bra size (or more) and wearing a good support bra can make you feel more comfortable.
Congestion and nosebleeds. Hormonal changes cause the mucus membranes lining your nose to swell, which can lead to a stuffy nose and make you snore at night. These changes may also make your nose bleed more easily. Before using a decongestant, check with your doctor. Saline drops and other natural methods may be safer ways to clear congestion during pregnancy. You can also try using a humidifier to keep the air moist. To stop a nosebleed, keep your head up straight (don't tilt it back) and apply pressure to the nostril for a few minutes until the bleeding stops.
Discharge. It's normal to see a thin, milky white vaginal discharge (called leukorrhea) early in your pregnancy. You can wear a panty liner if it makes you feel more comfortable, but don't use a tampon because it can introduce germs into the vagina. If the discharge is foul-smelling, green or yellow, bloody, or if there's a lot of clear discharge, call your doctor.
Frequent urination. Your uterus will rise away from the pelvic cavity during the second trimester, giving you a brief break from having to keep going to the bathroom. Don't get too comfortable, though. The urge to go will come back during the last trimester of your pregnancy.
Hair growth. Pregnancy hormones can boost hair growth -- and not always where you want it. The hair on your head will become thicker. You may also be seeing hair in places you never had it before, including your face, arms, and back. Shaving and tweezing might not be the easiest options, but they're probably your safest bets right now. Many experts don't recommend laser hair removal, electrolysis, waxing, or depilatories during pregnancy, because research still hasn't proven that they are safe for the baby. Check to see what your doctor recommends.
Headache. Headaches are one of the most common pregnancy complaints. Try to get plenty of rest, and practice relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing. Aspirin and ibuprofen shouldn’t be taken during pregnancy, but your doctor may say it's OK for you to take acetaminophen if you're really uncomfortable.
Heartburn and constipation. These are caused by your body making more of a hormone called progesterone. This hormone relaxes certain muscles, including the ring of muscle in your lower esophagus that normally keeps food and acids down in your stomach, and the ones that move digested food through your intestines. To relieve heartburn, try eating more frequent, smaller meals throughout the day and avoid greasy, spicy, and acidic foods (such as citrus fruits). For constipation, get more fiber and drink extra fluids to keep things moving more smoothly. Physical activity will also help move things along.
Hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are actually varicose veins -- swollen blue or purple veins that form around the anus. These veins may enlarge during pregnancy, because extra blood is flowing through them and there is increased pressure on them from the growing uterus. Varicose veins can be itchy and uncomfortable. To relieve them, try sitting in a warm tub or sitz bath. Ask your doctor whether you can use an over-the-counter hemorrhoid ointment.
Quickening. By the midpoint of your pregnancy (20 weeks) you will probably have started to feel the first delicate flutters of movement in your abdomen, which is often called "quickening." If you aren't feeling your baby move yet, don't worry. Some women don't experience quickening until their sixth month of pregnancy.
Skin changes. Pregnant women often look as though they are "glowing" because changing hormone levels make the skin on the face appear flushed. An increase in the pigment melanin can also lead to brown marks on the face (often called the "mask of pregnancy") and a dark line (linea nigra) down the middle of the abdomen. All of these skin changes should fade after the baby is born. In the meantime, you can use makeup to conceal them. Your skin is also more sensitive to the sun right now, so make sure to wear a broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB protection) sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 whenever you go outside. Limit your time in the sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., wearing long-sleeved clothes, pants, a broad-brimmed hat, and sunglasses. You may also notice thin, reddish-purple lines on your abdomen, breasts, or thighs. These stretch marks emerge as your skin expands to accommodate your growing belly. Although many creams and lotions claim to prevent or eliminate stretch marks, there is little evidence that they actually do. Using a moisturizer can help soften your skin and reduce itchiness. Most stretch marks should fade on their own after you deliver.
Spider and varicose veins. Your circulation has increased to send extra blood to your growing baby. That excess blood flow can cause tiny red veins, known as spider veins, to appear on your skin. These veins should eventually fade once your baby is born. Pressure on your legs from your growing baby can also slow blood flow to your lower body, causing the veins in your legs to become swollen and blue or purple. These are called varicose veins. Although there's no way to avoid varicose veins, you can prevent them from getting worse by getting up and moving throughout the day and propping up your legs on a stool whenever you have to sit for long periods of time. Wear support hose for extra support. Varicose veins should improve within three months after you deliver.
Weight gain. Morning sickness usually diminishes by the end of the first trimester. After that, your appetite should return, and will probably grow. Although food is looking much more appetizing, be aware of how much you're eating. You only need about an extra 300 to 500 calories a day during the second trimester, and you should be gaining about 1/2 to 1 pound a week.
Red Flag Symptoms
Any of these symptoms could be a sign that something is wrong with your pregnancy. Don't wait for your prenatal visit to talk about it. Call your doctor right away if you experience:
• Severe abdominal pain or cramping
• Bleeding
• Severe dizziness
• Rapid weight gain (more than 6.5 pounds per month) or too little weight gain (less than 10 pounds at 20 weeks into the pregnancy)
__________________
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Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014

Last edited by Offshoremama78; September 16th, 2013 at 12:11 PM.
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02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014
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  #5  
July 28th, 2013, 04:42 PM
smsturner's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Location: Upstate, NY
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Thanks. Can't believe how far I am already!
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I never knew until that moment how badly it could hurt to lose something you never really had. - Missed Miscarriage at 10 weeks - 3/26
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  #6  
July 31st, 2013, 09:44 AM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Location: Tucson, AZ
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On to week six for me.. bump
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Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014
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  #7  
August 4th, 2013, 10:55 PM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Updated
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Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014
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  #8  
September 16th, 2013, 11:42 AM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Bump
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Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014
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  #9  
October 18th, 2013, 07:45 PM
Offshoremama78's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Caught up till the end... If I find more info tho I will add it here....
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Alexander Cameron Murphy
02/27/2014 - 02/27/2014
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