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  #1  
July 16th, 2007, 10:22 AM
The Purple Butterfly's Avatar Stacey
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 10,092
Natural Remedies:
Natural Remedy
Coconut Oil
You can buy them pretty cheap here
Selenium & Your Thyroid

Looking for a Good Dr? Click here!

TTC/Pregnancy & The Thyroid:
Thyroid Disease & Infertility
The Thyroid & Pregnancy
Hypothyroid & Breastfeeding
*TTC with Hypothyroidism & Antithyroid Antibodies*

Soy and the negative effect on your thyroid!
Article #1
Article #2
Article #3

Basic Thyroid Info:
Congenital Hypothyroidism
Congenital Hypothyroidism 2
Thyroid Disease Triggers
Everything you need to know all-in-one AND something to print off to take with you to your drs!
Things that effect your thyroid meds!
Thyroid Images
*NEW* TSH Guidlines
Everything about TSH!
Thyroid Antibodies Test? Why?!
Hypothyroid Treatment Options
Thyroid Disease Symptoms
How To Tell if You Are Hyperthyroid
5 Lies About Your Thyroid That You Will Hear
How to Take Your Thyroid Meds

Basic Adrenal Info:
Struggling Adrenal Glands
Adrenal Fatigue vs. Low Thyroid


How to Interpret Your Thyroid Results!
1. Find out your thyroid test results from your doctor's office.
2. If you can, get a hard copy printout for your own review and home medical files.
3. If "normal" or "reference" ranges are not indicated on the lab results, ask your doctor's office to tell you what these ranges are.
4. Note the level of your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). At most labs in the U.S., the normal range is from around .3 to 3.0.
5. If the TSH level is below normal, your doctor may determine that you are hyperthyroid (overactive thyroid.)
6. If the TSH level is above normal, your doctor may determine that you are hypothyroid (underactive thyroid.)
7. If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a high TSH, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
8. If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a low TSH, your doctor might look into a pituitary problem.
9. If your doctor ran a test called Free T4, or Free Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 0.7 to 2.0. If your result was less than 0.7, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
10. If your doctor ran a test called Total T3, normal range is approximately 80 to 220. If your reweat was less than 80, your doctor might consito w2Cthat indicative of hypothyroidism.
11. If your doctor ran a test called Free T3, normal range is approximately 2.3 to 4.2. If your result was less than 2.3, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
12. If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, make sure you ask for an antibodies test. Some doctors believe in treating thyroid symptoms in the presence of elevated antibodies and normal TSH levels.
13. If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, consider going to a reputable holistic M.D. or alternative physician for further interpretation and diagnosis.

Tips:

1. Laboratory reference ranges and normal ranges can differ from lab to lab. Always go by your lab's reference range and your doctor's diagnosis.
__________________
Stacey, wife to Allan & Mom to:
Anastasia (14) C/S, 8lbs 7oz, 20.5"
Noah (11) C/S, 8lbs 12oz, 19"
Oliver (5) VBA2C, 7lbs 3oz, 19.5"
Grayson (10/16/13)2VBA2C, 9lbs 12oz, 22"
born sleeping at 39w pg; Protein C def, FVL, PAI-1 , & MTHFR
Lavender Kate (5/20/14) 2.5oz, 6" Lost at 16w

EDD May 12th with identical twin GIRLS!!


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  #2  
March 19th, 2008, 05:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 48
shampton, so happy to see in your notes the range for TSH is 0.3-3.0. Most labs don't have these ranges though, they have not changed them and I dislike that so much. Dr's still go by the old ranges as well.

I finally found the link I have been looking for from the AACE and it is current as of 2006. It also indicates that the ranges are still 0.30-3.0 since they changed them back in 2003 in hopes to help hypo's that were not being treated with tsh levels that were 4.0 and above.

I didn't know where to post this or even if I should but I figure I would post it and you all can see if it should be deleted or put elsewhere. No problem either way, just thought I'd get the article out here in case someone is having a hard time with their Endo and needed proof on paper to hand them and say hey what's this and why aren't you going by this.

Here is the link for AACE 2006 Press Release
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