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breast for comfort or food?


Forum: Breastfeeding

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  #21  
February 21st, 2005, 09:48 AM
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Everyone has their own thoughts about breastfeeding and feel pretty strongly about breastfeeding. There are attachment theories that say that one should be near their baby all of the time and feed them whenever the parent thinks that baby thinks it is hungry. There are others that say it is OK to let the baby cry for a few minutes, or to try to find other ways to soothe them, which will work equally well. These people are aware of the fact that a baby that eats longer at one time, vs. snacking, gets to the fattier, more filling milk on a regular basis, and hence doesn't get hungry as often. Also, some babies do like to suck ALL DAY and ALL NIGHT literally. Mine was like that, and I finally gave up and started bottle feeding. This constant sucking can be not only painful, also draining. Someone posted once (in response to one of my replies in this thread) that sometimes parenting is about sacrifices. It seemed to imply (to me) that the sacrifice would entail what attachment groups suggest doing. Sacrifice and making hard choices might also be about taking the lead and teaching babies NOT to suck all of the time, teaching them to get on a secure routine, putting up with hearing them cry for a bit as they and you, learn another way to soothe them. The thing to keep in mind is that there are a LOT of different opinions out there, and options.
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  #22  
February 21st, 2005, 10:59 AM
LuckyGirlx4's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Originally posted by dingledine@Feb 21 2005, 09:48 AM
The thing to keep in mind is that there are a LOT of different opinions out there, and options.
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You're right Suzanne. And it's extremely important, and our resonsibility as parents to be educated on all these options so that we can make the right decision for our families.
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  #23  
February 23rd, 2005, 08:06 AM
threeboyznme70's Avatar Veteran
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Quote:
Originally posted by dingledine@Feb 21 2005, 10:48 AM
Everyone has their own thoughts about breastfeeding and feel pretty strongly about breastfeeding.* There are attachment theories that say that one should be near their baby all of the time and feed them whenever the parent thinks that baby thinks it is hungry.* There are others that say it is OK to let the baby cry for a few minutes, or to try to find other ways to soothe them, which will work equally well.* These people are aware of the fact that a baby that eats longer at one time, vs. snacking, gets to the fattier, more filling milk on a regular basis, and hence doesn't get hungry as often.* Also, some babies do like to suck ALL DAY and ALL NIGHT literally.* Mine was like that, and I finally gave up and started bottle feeding.* This constant sucking can be not only painful, also draining.* Someone posted once (in response to one of my replies in this thread) that sometimes parenting is about sacrifices.* It seemed to imply (to me) that the sacrifice would entail what attachment groups suggest doing.* Sacrifice and making hard choices might also be about taking the lead and teaching babies NOT to suck all of the time, teaching them to get on a secure routine, putting up with hearing them cry for a bit as they and you, learn another way to soothe them.* The thing to keep in mind is that there are a LOT of different opinions out there, and options.
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except for the fact that sucking is anatural relfex taht ALL babies have for the first year of life (at a minimum)
The AAP endorses sleeping in close proximity and feeding on demand ...... I'll take that information over that of some of the other ones any day. I demand fed my 2 older boys when I was 20 and 22 LONG LONG LONG before I knew what attachment parenting was. I never felt like feeding my baby and comforting my baby was a sacrifice, but whoever it was that sai dthat is right. EVERYTHING about parenting is a sacrifice. I sure do miss having every otehr weekend without any kids ......... but Liam is worth the sacrifice!
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  #24  
February 24th, 2005, 11:40 AM
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Ach...I'm sorry I mentioned what my ped said! The thing is I always take what he says with a grain of salt, and in fact I didn't take his words to heart. I do bf Djuna when she asks for it (and these days it's a fight to get her to bf more often rather than less, what with all those exciting new "distractions" to check out, lol!). It just seemed worth while mentioning an alternative opinion that might be of interest to someone who seemed to be struggling with the 24 hr a day boobie sucking...

BTW my ped is definitely not a "push the formula" type. I think he said what he did more out of concern for the mother - that she not feel exhausted and drained by bf-ing - since her well-being is also very important to the baby.

Regarding my initial post:

Krista earlier said: " I will still nurse on demand, but I will not offer it everytime he is upset. I think there is a perfect balance between what you believe, and what your friend believes."

Upon reflection I don't think I stated how I really feel in my first post. I don't withhold the boob unless I think she "should" be hungry (ie. according to some artificial schedule). I do always offer it to her if she seems hungry. If she doesn't seem hungry I will try to figure out what is making her upset. If it's just that she needs to be close to me then I will hold her close, snuggle and cuddle her, walk, dance with her, etc. But if that doesn't seem to be what she needs then I am happy to nurse her. I just don't want to end up in my friend's position where I am nursing a 2 yr old every 5 mins for every little boo-boo. Obviously there are other comforts other than nursing (or else the men would be in trouble, lol!).
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  #25  
February 24th, 2005, 02:15 PM
LuckyGirlx4's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Originally posted by pianojazzgirl@Feb 24 2005, 11:40 AM
Ach...I'm sorry I mentioned what my ped said!* The thing is I always take what he says with a grain of salt, and in fact I didn't take his words to heart.* I do bf Djuna when she asks for it (and these days it's a fight to get her to bf more often rather than less, what with all those exciting new "distractions" to check out, lol!).* It just seemed worth while mentioning an alternative opinion that might be of interest to someone who seemed to be struggling with the 24 hr a day boobie sucking...

BTW my ped is definitely not a "push the formula" type.* I think he said what he did more out of concern for the mother - that she not feel exhausted and drained by bf-ing - since her well-being is also very important to the baby.

Regarding my initial post:

Krista earlier said:* " I will still nurse on demand, but I will not offer it everytime he is upset. I think there is a perfect balance between what you believe, and what your friend believes."

Upon reflection I don't think I stated how I really feel in my first post.* I don't withhold the boob unless I think she "should" be hungry (ie. according to some artificial schedule).* I do always offer it to her if she seems hungry.* If she doesn't seem hungry I will try to figure out what is making her upset.* If it's just that she needs to be close to me then I will hold her close, snuggle and cuddle her, walk, dance with her, etc.* But if that doesn't seem to be what she needs then I am happy to nurse her.* I just don't want to end up in my friend's position where I am nursing a 2 yr old every 5 mins for every little boo-boo.* Obviously there are other comforts other than nursing (or else the men would be in trouble, lol!).
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Don't be sorry that you brought up what your Ped. said, I'm glad that you did. Again, I'm sorry that my post came off as angry- again, I wasn't . I think it's important that we bring up these topics, being that this is a breastfeeding support board, to discuss, KWIM? I guess I felt like breast feeding was not being supported, and that why I was frustrated/desperate to get the good information out there. I'm really glad that you brought this up, and I hope we can all discuss these things in the future.
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  #26  
March 4th, 2005, 10:44 AM
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isn't 2 years old for b.*$%#?
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  #27  
March 4th, 2005, 10:45 AM
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I wrote bf-ing! Breast feeding!
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  #28  
March 4th, 2005, 11:05 AM
LuckyGirlx4's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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quote=tonyageiger,Mar 4 2005, 10:44 AM]
isn't 2 years old for b.*$%#?
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Nope, it's not too old at all. The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding for 2 years, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding exclusively for the first 6 months, and to continue to the first year and beyond.


World Health Organization on Breastfeeding

The World Health Organization's infant-feeding recommendation
As stated in the Global Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding (paragraph 10):



Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants; it is also an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers. As a global public health recommendation, infants should be exclusively breastfed1 for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health.2 Thereafter, to meet their evolving nutritional requirements, infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Exclusive breastfeeding from birth is possible except for a few medical conditions, and unrestricted exclusive breastfeeding results in ample milk production.


American Academy of Pediatrics Revised Recommendation for Breastfeeding

The policy recommendations include:


Exclusive breastfeeding for approximately the first six months and support for breastfeeding for the first year and beyond as long as mutually desired by mother and child.
Mother and infant should sleep in proximity to each other to facilitate breastfeeding;
Self-examination of mother's breasts for lumps is recommended throughout lactation, not just after weaning;
Support efforts of parents and the courts to ensure continuation of breastfeeding in cases of separation, custody and visitation;
Pediatricians should counsel adoptive mothers on the benefits of induced lactation through hormonal therapy or mechanical stimulation.
Recognize and work with cultural diversity in breastfeeding practices
A pediatrician or other knowledgeable and experienced health care professional should evaluate a newborn breastfed infant at 3 to 5 days of age and again at 2 to 3 weeks of age to be sure the infant is feeding and growing well.
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  #29  
March 4th, 2005, 01:22 PM
threeboyznme70's Avatar Veteran
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Quote:
Originally posted by tonyageiger@Mar 4 2005, 11:44 AM
isn't 2 years old for b.*$%#?
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well, if it is, we're in trouble because there's no way Liam's going to wean by April 3rd! LOL

No, 2 isnt' too old. What's too old for one mom is not for another. I used to think a year was too old .... back in my young ignorant years! LOL Having educated myself on the benefits of extended breastfeeding, I'll continue for as long as Liam wants (although secretly, I'm hoping sometime before he's 3 he'll wean ... HA ... fat chance ... he loves his "ursies")
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  #30  
March 4th, 2005, 02:32 PM
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Definatly not to old, Im hoping my son, now 1 will be done by three
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