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FYI: Measurements, Body Fat, Workout Cards


Forum: Mommy Weightloss and Fitness

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  #1  
June 5th, 2009, 06:26 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Location: Fitzgerald, GA
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Okay, I'm going to try and put all the basic information you might need in here for doing your measurements and body fat analysis at home, as well as workout cards to give you ideas for your workouts. I'm constantly doing up workout cards with my new software, so I'll probably be adding to this thread as time goes on. I will be stickying this thread so that we can all refer to it later too. Some of these workout cards and stuff you will have seen before, as I have posted them in various threads. I just thought that it would be a good idea to compile it all in one place for easier reference. So, here we go:

Measurements
Wrist--Measure around at the point between the bony protrusion of the arm and the hand
Forearm--Measure the length between the crook of the elbow and the wrist. Divide that in half and then measure around at the midpoint.
Bicep--Measure the length between the underarm and the crook of the elbow. Divide that in half and then measure around at the midpoint. If you are looking for muscle growth, do this measurement with the bicep flexed, as well as, relaxed.
Neck--Measure the length between the base of the jaw and the collarbone. Divide that in half and then measure around at the midpoint.
Shoulders--With the arms down by the side, measure around the body approximately 1 inch below the top of the shoulders.
Chest--Measure around the body with the tape measure at the base of the armpits.
Bust--Measure around the body at the fullest part of the breast, usually at the nipple line.
Waist--Bend sideways and feel for where the spine bends. Measure around the body at that spot.
Lower Abdominal--Measure around the body at the fullest part of the "baby bulge".
Hip--With the feet together, measure around the body at the fullest part of the butt.
Thigh--Measure the length between the connection point of the leg and the top of the kneecap. Divide that in half and measure around the thigh at the midpoint.
Calf--Measure the length between the bottom of the kneecap and the top of the foot. Divide that in half and measure around the calf at the midpoint. Another option on this one is to measure at the fullest part of the calf, but there is no guarantee that you are measuring the same spot each time with that option.

Measurement Guide from ACE Personal Trainer Manual



Body Fat Analysis
Hydrostatic Weighing--This is the most accurate form of body fat analysis, but it is usually only available at universities, hospitals, etc. as it is very expensive.
Bioelectrical Impedance--This is the second most accurate form of body composition analysis. It uses a low voltage electrical current to determine the percent of body fat based on height, age, gender, weight, and the speed of the current moving through the body. You will find this form of analysis in the form of scales and handheld devices. Because it is an electrical current, it is not recommended for anyone with a pacemaker or who is pregnant. The reading can be thrown off if you are using a battery operated device when the batteries become weak. It can also be thrown off by body water levels that fluctuate during TOM. I highly recommend this form of analysis, but not within 3 days before or after TOM.
Calipers--Body fat calipers are the 3rd most accurate. They will only read the topical body fat, however, and not the more dangerous body fat around the organs. Measurements are taken at specific sites of the body, added together, and then looked up on a chart to determine body fat percentage.

Caliper Measurement Sites from ACE Personal Trainer Manual


Body Fat Chart for Women from ACE Personal Trainer Manual


Caliper Measurement Sites from Aerobic Pipeline International Personal Trainer Manual


Body Fat Chart for Women from ACE Personal Trainer Manual


Body Density From Measurements--There are several formulas for determining body composition from body circumference measurements, height, weight, age, etc. Various websites use different formulas. Some are accurate and others aren't. The one I've found most accurate is from the ACE Personal Trainer Manual. There is a different formula for Men, so if you want to do these for your DH's, let me know and I'll post that formula as well.

Body Density for Women = 1.168297 - (0.002824 x abdomen measurement in centimeters) + (0.0000122098 x abdomen measurement in centimeters squared) - (0.000733128 x hip measurement in centimeters) + (0.000510477 x height in centimeters) - (0.000216161 x age)

Percent Fat = (495 / body density) - 450

Using Body Fat Percentage
Body fat percentage is helpful in determing a number of things, from fitness classification level to daily calorie needs.

Classifications for women are as follows:

Essential Fat (never go below these percentages)--10 to 13%
Athletes--14 to 20%
Fitness--21 to 24%
Average--25 to 31%
Overfat--32% or higher

Ideally, you should try to attain a body fat percentage in the athlete or fitness level.

Lean Body Mass
To determin lean body mass, multiply your weight by your body fat percentate to get the pounds of body fat. Subtract the pounds of body fat from the total weight to get the lean body mass. LBM is the total of muscles, bones, organs, and water in the body. The average for women is between 90 and 100 pounds. Anything over that is considered muscle mass, which burns calories and is a good thing to have around. Ideally, you should keep your lean body mass as high as possible to stave off osteoporosis and obesity.

Daily Calorie Needs
To determine your daily calorie needs, you will use your lean body mass because that is the calorie burning portion of the body. You will also need to estimate your activity level not counting exercise on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being sedentary and 5 being athlete. Most people have a range that they fall into so we will use the upper and lower numbers for that range. After that you will need to add in extra calories for exercise, breastfeeding, pregnancy, etc., generally 300 to 500 extra calories. Here is the formula:

(Lean Body Mass in pounds x 24) / 2.2 = basal metabolic rate (never go this low in daily calories)

BMR x activity level multipliers for upper and lower activity level to get a calorie range not counting exercise, pregnancy, or breastfeeding.

Activity Level Multipliers:
1--Sedentary--multiply by 1.2
2--Lightly Active--multiply by 1.4
3--Moderately Active--multiply by 1.5
4--Highly Active--multiply by 1.7
5--Athletic--multiply by 1.8

Add in exercise, breastfeeding, and/or pregnancy calories.

These calorie ranges can then be broken down by carbs, protein, and fat. Multiply the total calories by the percentages of each that you wish to maintain. Divide the calories for carbs and protein by 4 and the calories for fat by 9 to get grams per day.

Example: 200 pound woman with 30% body fat, activity level is lightly to highly active depending on the day, with an estimated calorie burn from exercise of 300 calories.

200 x .3 = 60
200 - 60 = 140
140 x 24 = 3360
4800 / 2.2 = 1527.2727
1527.2727 x 1.4 = 2138.1818
1527.2727 x 1.7 = 2596.3636

Non-Exercise day range = 2138 to 2596 calories per day

Add in 300 calories for exercise gives an Exercise Day range of 2438 to 2896 calories per day

To determine carbs, protein, and fat for non-exercise days.

2138 x .6 = 1282.8
1282.8 / 4 = 320.7

2596 x .6 = 1557.6
1557.6 / 4 = 389.4

Carb range is 321 to 389 grams per day

2138 x .25 = 534.5
534.5 / 4 = 133.625

2596 x .25 = 642.25
642.25 / 4 = 160.5625

Protein range is 134 to 161 grams per day

2138 x .15 = 320.7
320.7 / 9 = 35.63333

2596 x .15 = 385.35
385.35 / 9 = 42.816667

Fat range is 36 to 43 grams per day

Repeat for carb, protein, and fat calculations for Exercise days.

Exercise Recommendations
Resistance Training is recommended to be done 2-3 days per week, with a minimum of 48 hours rest between sessions working the same muscle groups.

Cardiovascular Exercise is recommended to be done 3-5 days per week for a minimum of 30 minutes. Cardio done after resistance will burn a higher percentage of stored body fat then cardio done alone. If cardio is done alone, it should be a minimum of 45 minutes.

Flexibility Training is recommeded to be done 5-7 days per week. Hold each stretch for approximately 15 to 30 seconds and repeat each stretch at least 2 times. Never stretch cold muscles as you risk tearing them. Always at least warm up before stretching, but perferably, stretch after your normal workout.

Isometric Exercises












Beginner and Intermediate Workout Cards














I'll post more regarding exercise testing and other workouts later.
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #2  
September 19th, 2009, 11:00 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: May 2007
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New Exercise Cards.....more coming soon

Hip and Glute Stretch


Hip Therapy


Balance Training


Wrist and Hand


Osteoporosis/Arthritis (but can also be a relaxation or wake up for the general population)


Beginner Pilates
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #3  
November 26th, 2009, 09:30 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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In preparation for New Years, I'm posting some info on fitness testing. These are tests you can do to determine your fitness level in various areas so that you can see what areas of fitness you need to focus on to get to optimal health.

Cardiovascular Endurance Tests
Cardiovascular endurance is defined as the ability to engage in whole-body activity such as brisk walking, jogging, swimming or cycling continuously for long periods of time (20 plus minutes). These types of activities raise the heart rate and increase respiration and blood flow. Aerobic or cardio respiratory fitness is the most important aspect of physical fitness. The term aerobic means in the presence of oxygen, and refers to the type of exercise which requires a sustained heart rate for long periods of time. The term cardio respiratory refers to your heart, lungs, and circulatory system, which together supply blood and oxygen to your exercising muscles. The purpose of the tests listed below is to provide an accurate measurement of how efficiently the body can take in, deliver, and utilize oxygen during exercise.

Three-Minute Step Test
1. Use a 12 inch step, stool, or bench for the exam, and if available, a metronome at 96 bpm to regulate the pace of the steps.
2. Step up and down at a 4 count pace, (up, up, down, down) at approximately 24 steps per minute.
3. Time this activity for 3 minutes.
4. At the end of the 3 minutes, sit down and take your pulse for one full minute.

Test Results Men Women
Excellent 80-94 bpm 79-87 bpm
Good 95-122 bpm 88-120 bpm
Fair 123-130 bpm 121-134 bpm

12-Minute Walk/Run
The objective of this test is to complete the most distance in 12 minutes. Allow at least 5 minutes of warm-up before you begin the test.
1. Use a treadmill with a distance monitor.
2. Have an assistant time the 12 minutes. Starting and stopping at their command of time.
3. Record the distance walked, jogged, or run in that 12 minutes in miles.

Test Results Men Women
Excellent 1.5-1.75 1.25-1.5
Good 1.25-1.49 1.15-1.24
Fair 1.15-1.24 1.0-1.14

1.5 Mile Walk/Run
The objective of this test is to complete the 1.5 miles in the shortest amount of time. Allow at least 5 minutes of warm-up before you begin the test. You will need a stopwatch to time this test.
1. Use either a treadmill with a distance monitor, or a flat area where 1.5 miles has been pre-determined.
2. Have an assistant start and stop the watch as you begin and end the 1.5-mile distance. The exerciser may walk, jog, and/or run depending on how they feel.
Interpreting the test (in minutes:seconds)
The fitness category is good for times listed; Category is excellent for test completion in less then time listed.

AGE MEN WOMEN
Less then 30 12:00 15:54
30-39 12:30 16:30
40-49 13:00 17:30
50-59 14:30 19:00
60 or over 16:15 19:30
Record these results on the fitness assessment form. Take these assessments approximately every 2 to 3 months to see how much your training has helped.

Precautions for cardiovascular tests
a. Stop the test if you begin to feel light headed, dizzy, or uncomfortable.
b. Find a cool area to rest and stretch afterward.
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #4  
November 26th, 2009, 09:47 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Muscular Endurance Tests

Muscular endurance refers to the ability of a muscle or group of muscles to engage in repetitive movement using light to moderate work loads for a sustained period of time.

Modified Curl-Up Test

A low score on the modified curl-up test could indicate potential back problems.

1. Lie on the floor with calves and lower legs resting on the seat of a chair or with feet flat on the ground and knees bent.

2. Cross hands on chest or extend hands along sides of hips.

3. Have an assistant time you for one minute and count the number of curls as you lift the shoulder blades 30-40 degrees off the ground and lower back to the floor.

4. Do not rock hips off the ground or jerk the head forward and back.

5. Record the number of curls performed in one minute.

Test Results Men Women

Excellent Greater then 45 Greater then 45

Good 21-49 18-44

Fair Less then 21 Less then 18


Push-ups Test


Tests for upper body endurance. For this test, men should use the full extended body position and women should use the modified bent-knee position. Hands should be shoulder width apart. The person being tested must hold themselves in the correct position throughout the entire test.

1. Perform complete push-ups, with the chest coming within 3 inches from the floor. A complete push-up begins and ends in the up position.

2. Record the total number of push-ups in one minute.

Test Results Men Less then 30 Men 30-50 Men Over 50 Women Less then 30 Women 30-50 Women Over 50

Excellent Greater then 71 Greater then 64 Greater then 56 Greater then 35 Greater then 31 Greater then 28

Good 63-71 57-64 50-56 30-35 27-31 24-28

Average 54-62 48-56 43-49
24-29 21-26 20-23

Fair 44-53 39-47 34-42
16-23 13-20 12-19

Poor Less then 44 Less then 39 Less then 34
Less then 16 Less then 13 Less then 12


Bench Press Test

Women use a 35 pound bar, Men use an 80 pound bar. One rep is counted when elbows are fully extended.

1. Get in bench press position. One rep is when the bar is lowered to within 3 inches of the chest and then raised to full extension of the elbows.

2. Record the total number of reps in one minute.

Age 18-25 26-35 36-45 46-55 56 and over

Excellent Greater then 38 Greater then 34 Greater then 30 Greater then 24 Greater then 20

Good 32-37 28-33 24-29 20-23
14-19

Average 22-31 20-27 17-23 12-19
7-13

Fair 13-21 12-19 10-16 5-11
2-6

Poor Less then 13 Less then 12 Less then 10 Less then 5 Less then 2


Record these results on the fitness assessment form. Take these assessments approximately every 2 to 3 months to see how much your training has helped.

Flexibility Tests

Flexibility is the range of motion at a joint due to the ability of the soft tissue surrounding the joint to stretch. Low flexibility can result in pulled muscles, ligaments, etc. which can be painful and all too often sidetracks workouts.

The following are some flexibility tests that you can do to help assess your risk for low flexibility injuries.

Sit & Reach

The sit and reach test is used to evaluate low back and hamstring range of motion around the hip joint. A low test score could indicate future low back problems. Tight hamstrings and lower back muscles along with weak abdominal muscles are the main reasons that back pain can occur. Here are the steps to determine your sit and reach flexibility score.

1. Sit on the floor with both legs extended in front of you.

2. Flex your ankles and place your feet flat up against a box, making sure your ankles are approximately 6 inches apart and your legs are straight. (DON'T BEND YOUR KNEES!)

3. Place the 14" mark of a tape measure or yard stick at the edge of the box with the smaller numbers extending off the box between your legs and the larger numbers farther away from you.

4. Overlap your fingers and lean forward, maintaining knees in contact with the floor.

5. Record in inches how far you were able to reach.

6. Repeat the reach 2 more times and record the best score.

Test Results
Men
Women

Excellent
22" +
24"+

Good
16.5-21"
17.5-23"

Fair
12-16"
15-17"




Hip Joint & Inner Thigh Flexibility


1. Sit on the floor with the soles of your feet together.

2. Allow your knees to drop out as far as possible.

3. Record the distance from the floor to the middle of the knee cap.

Excellent
Knees touch the surface of the floor

Good
Knees 6" or less from the floor

Fair
Knees more then 6" from the floor


Shoulder Reach

To test for shoulder flexibility, which can be an indicator of your risk of rotator cuff injury.

1. Reach overhead with the left arm.

2. Bend the elbow of the left arm so that the hand reaches with the palm down the shoulder blades.

3. Reach the right hand up and under in an attempt to touch the fingers fo the left hand. The palm of the right hand is facing away from the body.

4. Measure the distance between the finger tips of the right and left hands. This is your score for the right shoulder.

5. Repeat on the opposite side for the left shoulder score.

Excellent
Fingers can touch

Good
Fingertips are 1-2" apart

Fair
Fingertips are more then 2" apart


Record these results on the fitness assessment form. Take these assessments approximately every 2 to 3 months to see how much your training has helped.
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #5  
May 30th, 2010, 03:15 PM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Other workouts I had on my computer and not on here yet. I'll have to make some more now that I have all of the ones on my computer up here.

Chest 2




Legs 2




Shoulders and Arms




Total Body




Chest and Back




Ankle

__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #6  
May 31st, 2010, 11:51 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: May 2007
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Found some more workouts I'd put together a couple of years ago.

Sciatica Relief


Upper Body Stretch


Shoulders and Abs


Lower Body Stretch


Legs 3


Chest and Triceps


No Weights Resistance


Back and Biceps
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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  #7  
May 9th, 2011, 07:57 AM
TrainingWithTonya's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: May 2007
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Wheelchair Workout:


Total Body Free Weight Workout:


Snatch Lift:


Plyometrics:


Plyometrics 2:


Dynamic Warm-Up:


Core on the Ball:


Back 2:


Arms 2:


Aqua:


Yoga:
__________________
Tonya Wife to Mike, Mom to Bobby (19) and Koti (17)
Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, and Sports Nutritionist
Valdosta State University Class of 2012, Major: Exercise Physiology, Minor: Nutrition
Masters in Exercise Science Starting August 2012 at the University of South Florida

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