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When did your kids begin to read?


Forum: Homeschooling

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  #21  
April 26th, 2008, 10:22 AM
Butter's Avatar Heather the Mama Duk
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Antonio TX
Posts: 28,853
Not around here. They start learning in kindergarten or preschool (since many are sent to preschool nowadays). Very few know how to read before that.
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  #22  
April 26th, 2008, 10:28 AM
AmAnDaMo's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Posts: 3,671
Maybe it's just my area, then. It's not uncommon at all for kids to already know how to read to some degree before going off to school around here.
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  #23  
April 26th, 2008, 02:58 PM
joandsarah77's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Ok so I am wading into this thread lol. I was staying out of it because I have the only non reader on this board, which kind of makes me feel bad even though I know I shouldn't feel that way. I didn't read until 7. For me it just clicked and I became a very good reader almost overnight. I hope Sarah will be the same way. My daughter is nearly 6 1/2 and knows her basic alphabet sounds but can not really blend. She will sound out two letters as separate sounds then tends to guess the third. Which I am trying to stop because usually what she guesses isn't even the last letter there. Her friend who is just 6 weeks older isn't reading yet either. Our standards for Prep (K) grade 1 grade 2 are lower then the States standards luckily or she may have noticed she wasn't keeping up; but as it is her age class is not that far ahead.

I am very much against the early push of academics. Not just because I have a child who would not meet them, but because pressure to perform is wrong for all young children. It's one thing to expose a class to letters, sounds and reading, but it's wrong to then make expectations from that and start to make tests and set curriculum based on those expectations. What is it with all the rush to get kids reading, doing grammar, and maths such as multiplication all by second grade??
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  #24  
April 27th, 2008, 08:50 AM
MissyPrincessEha's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 11,318
I think it is a mixture of things...but I do know that it is hurting more than it is helping. It is just another big mistake in the long line of mistakes public schooling as made. We are starting to see how stressed these kids are, and how once behind thy have a hard time ever catching back up.

But what is sad to me is that what they are teaching is below what my homeschool pals are teaching their kids. And their kids are getting it. But they can spend time, allow the child to play alot, and stop when they start to lose interest.

You don't have to fustrate a child in order to help them grow in smarts. They are spending WHOLE days with our children and they can't get results! HELLO...can they not see they need to change? It makes me so sad and angry.

Eli was reading by age 5, it took it about a month of daily work that took a few minutes each time. He learned those sounds and had them together. We then went on to different rules. It didn't take hours a day or him being away from me.

Remy was 4 and I hadn't tried to teach him sounds...they were mentioned when we worked on a letter with paint or whatever. This started at 3 and by 4 he was reading like bat and stuff. Remy and I have really had to learn each other. He has insisted on a huge work load...and I have have insisted on having a little boy! We have found a balance. And some days I allow him to do lots of school. But then he wants it like that the next.

He is doing what would take a classroom hours to do in only 10 or so minutes.

Jo, I have to say something. I have "seen" your child growing through your posts. You are meeting her needs. She is so very smart. Reading comes...you don't have to follow the rat race here in the US. And your right! Exposure is the thing! Show them, have fun with it, and be done. After that you just keep meeting them where they are.
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  #25  
April 27th, 2008, 01:36 PM
joandsarah77's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Thankyou Chelita! That means a lot to me.
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  #26  
April 27th, 2008, 02:23 PM
Butter's Avatar Heather the Mama Duk
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Location: San Antonio TX
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You know, you do often hear of early reading homeschoolers, but when I think about it I know many, many, many average age readers and quite a few late readers. The thing is, much like Jo, they hesitate to chime in when everyone is saying "my kids was reading at 2, 3, 4." In fact on this very board I had someone a while ago (several months, nothing to do with this thread) PM me saying how she was very frustrated by all the people talking about their early readers. I pointed out that there are several average age readers and some not reading (at the time Cameron was one of those not reading and he was almost 6 then) past when other kids were reading. The thing is those more typical kids tend to not come up in discussions between homeschoolers because often people feel bad that their kid wasn't reading at 2, 3, or 4. It's just another one of those places in the homeschooling world where people focus on the amazing and downplay the "average" and especially the "late" and I'm not so sure that's a good thing. It truly doesn't matter to me that Ani read when she was 4 1/2 and Cameron not until very, very recently at 6 1/2. It's when they were ready and no matter when kids learn to read it should be celebrated and looked at as awe-inspiring, since, after all, learning to read is not an easy feat no matter what the age.
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  #27  
April 27th, 2008, 03:13 PM
Stellaluna's Avatar Super Mommy
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I do know that in our local area it's not terribly common to be reading before Kindergarten. My friend from down the street has a little girl in the same school Sam would have gone to if he was in public school and her little girl was the only one reading at the start of the year (she was maybe reading at a late K level upon entering). Same thing with my nephew and other friend's children's K classes..maybe one or two kids reading at the start of the year. We don't however, live in a terribly academically competitive area so that could be part of it.

I have noticed that there does seem to be a higher ratio of homeschooled kids we know, both in real life and online who read earlier..probably for the reason Heather mentioned and probably the one on one teaching plays a role too.

Jo - you have nothing to worry about..Sarah is a bright, creative little girl and she's doing fantastically!

For me, the most frustrating thing with having an early reader was the automatic assumption that we were somehow hothousing or "pushing" him.

It seems like you just can't win..assumptions are made that if you have an early reader you're a pushy parent, if you have a late reader they must be behind somehow. Thanks goodness for homeschooling!
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  #28  
April 27th, 2008, 06:33 PM
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I think a lot of it is we all meet our kids needs. A lot of times DH has to remind me I don't hate reading because I do it all the time on the computer. Old habits die hard. Kids around here most don't really start reading until around 2nd if not later there are 9 yr olds that tell me there to young to read. Granted I'm sure they are in reading help but hopefully they wont hate it before they get it. I was one of those kids that failed k because I couldn't read 3 letter words. I'm on other boards that some kids are ten or older and their parents go by the better late then early philosophy. My DS just took after DH.
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  #29  
April 28th, 2008, 07:05 AM
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I get that too, that because my oldest kid learned to read a few words at 2 that I must have been pushing him. That wasn't the case at all. He was born ready to read and there wasnt' anything I could do about it. My 5 yr old on the other hand doesn't have a ton of interest in learning to read so she will do it at her own pace. It's super important to meet kids where they are and not force anything.

The Waldorf method of education is one that I have alot of interest in and they do not recommend teaching reading at all until age 7. Some people balk at the idea of a school that doesn't teach reading to preK and Kdg'ers because that is what we're used to in this culture. Bigger, Better, Faster, Now!
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  #30  
April 28th, 2008, 08:17 AM
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Ok, just to chime in here a little late. Eathan is just now starting to get the idea that all of these letters he knows makes the words he sees. He'll be 5 in July. I don't know when he'll be reading. Honestly, when he's interested in learning I show him and when he's not I don't. I know he'll get it in time and I'm in no hurry for him to grow up. Plus DH and I like to still be able to spell stuff out in front of him. It's almost a game now to watch Eathan try and figure out what we're spelling. Anywho, back on subject, I personally don't think reading early makes anyone a better reader than anyone else. I was reading at 4 and honestly, I am not a reader. I just don't have that passion for finding a book and reading for hours. I just want to teach my children the know how and let them figure out on their own if they want to get lost for hours in a book or if they just want to know how to read for life.
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  #31  
April 28th, 2008, 01:53 PM
joandsarah77's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Thanks Jenn. I hadn't thought about the 'hothousing' problem. Now to get the grands to stop thinking she's behind. *sigh* can't win either way.
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  #32  
April 28th, 2008, 03:18 PM
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You know what, I TOTALLY agree with ya'll! In my family of homeschoolers, we had the older kids who needed reading help because we were public schooled. lol When I started 3rd grade I had only been taught whole language and couldn't sound anything out worth beans. I couldn't spell either. My brother wasn't any better. My mom had to have us re-learn how to read. My little sister who never went a day to public school began reading at age 4 and was right on level with me in 3 months. At age 8 she read 600-800 page books. She was the Matilda of the family and she read War and Peace at the age of 14. She was just that way. But we had the other kids after that were ages 6 and 7 before they read. It wasn't a race.

For me I really love that Emily is reading now, but I really am shocked because I haven't done anything spectacular. I feel that is just who she is. I read to my kids, got her a couple letter posters, magnets, LeapFrog DVDs and an interactive game. I bought her hooked on phonics thinking I would sit her down and teach her all the lessons. It didn't work, that isn't her style. She was much better doing it alone. Even now if I try to over help her, she doesn't like it. She likes to be left to do it on her own. I don't know how my other children will be. But you know so far she isn't as big on the math thing. Every kid has different strengths and they are ready with different things at different times. It proved to be that way with my siblings and has proved to be the same in so many people I know. So yeah I have had neighbors ask if I sit her down and how can they help their kids read, what curriculum I used and did I drill her on it. No, in fact I know her well enough that had I done that with her, she would NOT be reading now.

Jo- your kids are so smart and you work so hard with them. It is totally normal. People say stupid things sometimes and people pick on me when my kids don't crawl until they are 12 months or walk until they are 16 months. Or my 4 year old who STILL wets her pants and we have been doing the potty thing for 1 1/2 years now! It's just how they are, they just take time in other areas.
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  #33  
April 28th, 2008, 08:22 PM
*Sharon*'s Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
I get that too, that because my oldest kid learned to read a few words at 2 that I must have been pushing him. That wasn't the case at all. He was born ready to read and there wasnt' anything I could do about it. My 5 yr old on the other hand doesn't have a ton of interest in learning to read so she will do it at her own pace. It's super important to meet kids where they are and not force anything.

The Waldorf method of education is one that I have alot of interest in and they do not recommend teaching reading at all until age 7. Some people balk at the idea of a school that doesn't teach reading to preK and Kdg'ers because that is what we're used to in this culture. Bigger, Better, Faster, Now! [/b]

Yes! I wish that I had been taught or allowed to learn this way. As I mentioned earlier I was a late reader (as was my dh). And we were pushed, stressed, and humiliated for not knowing how to read when we were in our early school years. As I mentioned we were both even called retarded. My parents were told that I would never learn to read. To my first grade teacher! Not only did I learn to read just fine, but I went on to start college at 16 majoring in creative writing. lol

My dd is an early reader. And like Motherbird I did not push her to read. I didn't teach her to read even. Sheesh, I only taught her a couple letters and that was because we had a couple of letter A and B books. I had no intentions of pushing her into trying to do something of which she wasn't capable.

I was not capable for learning to read when I was really young. I don't know why. But I tried and tried and it was impossible. So Jo, I can relate with your dd. BUT she is blessed to be in a homeschooling environment. She isn't being pressured, ridiculed, humiliated, and belittled because she hasn't yet learned to read. Better late than early is a quote I sometimes hear. And at first I was like huh? when I first read it, but when I came to understand what it meant better I fully agree. Pushing a child to early to learn something can cause more harm than good whereas waiting until they are ready and letting them learn it in there on time may get you some negative comments from others, but that child will learn it much faster. And without the negative feelings that can come from feeling incapable.

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