Log In Sign Up

Math


Forum: Homeschooling

Notices

Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards.

We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to boards@justmommies.com.

Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on!

Reply Post New Topic
  Subscribe To Homeschooling LinkBack Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
  #1  
April 17th, 2010, 12:47 PM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,051
I have a strong background in math (majored in it in college) and am comfortable with teaching basic ideas like addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and place value. Because of this, I don't think I would want to be a strict follower of a math curriculum with my children. However, I want to have something to follow along with to make sure I don't forget things like patterning, skip counting, etc. I also would like the sequence of what should be taught first (skip counting before multiplication or after?).

So what I'm looking for is a simple, cheap math curriculum for K-5 or so. I was at a curriculum fair yesterday and looked at Singapore, since it's pretty cheap, but the textbook is so busy! I want something simple.

Any suggestions? Has anyone here used singapore? Do you think that I could get just the instructor's guide and skip the busy workbooks and textbooks that go with it? Do the instructor's guides have problems or just teaching methods? It might be nice to not have to make up a bunch of word problems and such.

Thanks!
__________________
Mama to an elementary school boy, kindergarten girl, and my miracle toddler girl.
Three 10w losses (11/2010 + 8/2011 + 10/2014)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
April 17th, 2010, 02:12 PM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: The Lonestar State
Posts: 50,214
Singapore is different from most of the other curriculum options out there. I personally wouldn't use it for what you're looking for. If all you REALLY want is a pattern or guide, you can look at the "scope & sequence" or the table of contents for publishers online (free) and/or you can look at your state's guidelines for the basics (although most people teach more than the state requires). You can also make up your own worksheets or print them online (free). If you're looking for hands-on materials, you can buy math kits that include blocks, clocks, rulers, fake money, etc., or you can make/buy that stuff yourself separately on an as-needed basis.

To get an idea what to teach each year, also consider how fast/slow the publisher is. Horizons is probably a full grade level (or more sometimes) ahead of state guidelines. Abeka is a little ahead. Rod & Staff is something I'd suggest buying if you want something simple and cheap to guide you (sold as a set with teacher/student materials, but all you'd really need is the teacher book if you can find it). R&S is slow by homeschool standards, but right on target for most states and standardized tests.

If you want to print worksheets, I'd suggest:

Free Math Worksheets at DadsWorksheets.com
Free Math Worksheets
edHelper.com - Math, Reading Comprehension, Themes, Lesson Plans, and Printable Worksheets (this is a paid membership site)
http://themathworksheetsite.com/
SuperKids Math Worksheet Creator
Math Worksheets, Tables, Charts and more from HelpingWithMath.com
Multiplication.com - Teach the Multiplication Facts - Times Tables

Something cool if you're interested, but you probably won't need these:

A Maths Dictionary for Kids 2010 by Jenny Eather
Multiplication Tables Game "Timez Attack"
Reply With Quote
  #3  
April 17th, 2010, 09:53 PM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,051
Thanks for all of the links! I've looked at the standards for my state, and it's in such weird language. It sounds like they think 2nd graders should understand algebraic equations, which doesn't seem right, so they must be using funny language to mean something else.

I'll take a look at the scope/sequence and table of contents for various publishers and find one that looks good.
__________________
Mama to an elementary school boy, kindergarten girl, and my miracle toddler girl.
Three 10w losses (11/2010 + 8/2011 + 10/2014)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
April 17th, 2010, 10:05 PM
dalynnrmc's Avatar pronounced (day-lynn)
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: near Waco, TX
Posts: 3,305
A super easy site for curriculum standards is World Book.
__________________



Much thanks to Alethia for my beautiful siggie and tags!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
April 17th, 2010, 10:15 PM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: The Lonestar State
Posts: 50,214
Yeah, that too. You can also look at a book series called "What your x'th grader needs to know" (x = the grade level, of course).
Reply With Quote
  #6  
April 17th, 2010, 11:10 PM
AmAnDaMo's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverlife View Post
It sounds like they think 2nd graders should understand algebraic equations, which doesn't seem right, so they must be using funny language to mean something else.
That probably only means that they can solve something simple like __ + 24 = 56. Most 2nd graders would understand that they could take 24 from 56 to find the answer without truly understanding "algebra", although they like to call it that. And even if they counted up by 10's from 24 until they hit 54 and then counted by 1's to 56 to get the answer, I imagine they'd still try to call that "understanding" algebraic equations if they equate getting the right answer with understanding.
__________________



Last edited by AmAnDaMo; April 17th, 2010 at 11:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
April 18th, 2010, 08:17 AM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,051
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmAnDaMo View Post
That probably only means that they can solve something simple like __ + 24 = 56. Most 2nd graders would understand that they could take 24 from 56 to find the answer without truly understanding "algebra", although they like to call it that. And even if they counted up by 10's from 24 until they hit 54 and then counted by 1's to 56 to get the answer, I imagine they'd still try to call that "understanding" algebraic equations if they equate getting the right answer with understanding.
Well, first grade has this:
Use number sense and models of addition and subtraction, such as objects and number lines, to identify the missing number in an equation such as:
2 + 4 = __
3 + __ = 7
5 = __ – 3.

But 2nd grade has this:
Understand how to interpret number sentences involving addition, subtraction and unknowns represented by letters. Use objects and number lines and create real-world situations to represent number sentences.

And:
Use number sentences involving addition, subtraction, and unknowns to represent given problem situations. Use number sense and properties of addition and subtraction to find values for the unknowns that make the number sentences true.

They're using "number sentences" to mean equations, and in the example, they use letters for the unknown rather than blanks (they used blanks in 1st grade standards). I think the first one is asking them to take something like "15 - a = 12" and make up a word problem. But I think the 2nd one wants them to actually solve a word problem by writing the equation and finding for the variable is.
__________________
Mama to an elementary school boy, kindergarten girl, and my miracle toddler girl.
Three 10w losses (11/2010 + 8/2011 + 10/2014)
Reply With Quote
  #8  
April 18th, 2010, 08:42 AM
AmAnDaMo's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3,671
That sounds like just sticking a letter in for the unknown, creating story problems to represent equations, and setting up equations to represent the information given in story problems to solve for the unknown...not much of a stretch from what is expected in 1st, but they sure like to make it sound more complicated, huh?
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #9  
April 18th, 2010, 03:19 PM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,365
This I have heard is good as well, and it is free.

MEP math.
__________________
Momma to :
E-10.5yrs 11/03
S-7.75yrs 8/06
A-6yrs 3/08
J-4.5yrs 11/09
K 2.5yrs 9/11
And
L-7/12/14!!!!



Reply With Quote
  #10  
April 19th, 2010, 10:06 AM
Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 784
I use just the workbooks from Singapore math it works well for us because it's black and white and simple and clear. I don't mess with the teachers guide and the text books. Each Activity takes about 5-10 min. at most.Though it's not uncommon to get through 2+ years with just using the work books. I tried using both the text and work book but that was to much for him he got through less then 1/2 a year because it was a struggle to get him to do any of it so we ditched the text about a month ago and he's almost done with 3rd grade and moving to 4th. The instructors guide looks boring and not really what you are looking for. I would try a work book and see if you like it.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:29 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0