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What is your "philosophy"?


Forum: Homeschooling

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  #1  
May 2nd, 2011, 03:28 PM
TaraJo29's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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If you have one, just wondered what everyone's HS'ing philosophy is (i.e. Charlotte Mason-ish, Classical, etc.) and maybe you could offer a little explanation of what it means to you and why you do it.

I am really torn as to what my philosophy is. I know my goals for my children overall, but I don't have an educational philosophy in place to help me get there. I just pick what I think will work (I'm right 50% of the time! lol).

I kind of lean toward the Charlotte Mason approach as far as I understand it, since I think it's a good idea to develop a child's love of reading real books (instead of text books which often suck the life out of the subject). At the same time, though, I don't think a text book HAS to be dry and boring. I consider Apologia Science books text books but I don't think they're written in a boring manner at all. That's what I love about them... they give you the bold words and some questions at the end of the Lesson, but it's written in a very engaging way with real pictures. So, in a way, I don't think it has to be an "either / or" in terms of "boring textbook" or "engaging living book," though, unfortunately, it often ends up that way.

I honestly don't know much about Classical education or other philosophies. I should read a book on the different approaches.

Anyhoo, what is your philosophy?
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  #2  
May 2nd, 2011, 04:05 PM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
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Don't have one, and don't want one.

I do what works for each kiddo, and what works best for me as well(but what works best for the kiddos, comes first).

I don't think a philosophy is really necessary to be honest. It's actually something I'm sort of against, in a way. Different people work differently and that includes children. To take the same approach with each child might prove to be pretty difficult(then again, it also might not). I'm honestly not real certain how people manage to pull it off, to be honest. I try to understand, I just haven't yet, lol.
I mean I understand *wanting to have a certain approach, that I totally get. But what if your approach or your philosophy won't work on your next child(or any for that matter)? What if later down the road you see perhaps your methods weren't the best, even if they seemed to be(at the time)? What then?

I prefer to leave my options open, so I approach things, like this, on an as needed basis. What works for one of my kiddos very well may not work for them all. What methods *I* like, they may not, or they simply may just not be enough, or "right" for them. Pretty much the way I take any area of parenting, actually. I have a lot of ideals in my own head, but that doesn't necessarily mean I'll ever be able to put them into practice.(or that I'll want to).

Then again, ideally the world would be a perfect place Ideals are fun, in theory, I find more times than not, they aren't nearly as fun as they seem, in practice.
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  #3  
May 2nd, 2011, 04:49 PM
JustAKrazymom's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I also don't have no want one. We are very eclectic..even with us now in "the box" we still are very eclectic.

I am teaching 3 kids, all of whom learn very differently.. no way one size fits all for them. I just want each to learn to their best and fulliest and I will ebb and flow, bend and sway to help !
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  #4  
May 2nd, 2011, 04:54 PM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
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I'm also very eclectic and teach however a child learns best, but if I had to choose something, I'd say I lean toward classical. We teach Latin, we believe you can start with basic facts and then build into logic, we believe history should be taught chronologically, etc., etc. I don't stick to the classical timeline or anything like that, and it's a coincidence that many of the things we do (Apologia, MoH, etc.) fall into the classical style, but yeah... that's pretty much me. I call myself "classically eclectic."
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  #5  
May 2nd, 2011, 05:37 PM
JustAKrazymom's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I do so much Charlotte mason, classic, Montessori etc.. I do what feels right..
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  #6  
May 3rd, 2011, 06:04 AM
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I agree with doing what works for each child, but I (personally) also don't think its good to stick with one if the child loves it and the mother hates it. For example, Saxon Math....Ethan loved it but I was not disciplined with making all the 'crafty' things, which would ultimately take away from his experience so we've moved on.

That being said, right now I am loving the Charlotte Mason philosophy and I think you could tweak it to work for the different personalities of different children. I am definitely not tied to it, but we're leaning in that direction. I love the 'living books' concept, but I also read (through some of her supporting materials) that some of the moms have still used text books to support a living book. There's so much more to it than the living books, though. She ultimately wanted to keep the curiosity that children have about the world alive and therefore turn them into self-educators. She advocates spending several hours outside a day to let children explore, play, etc. and she was always finished with school work in the morning to allow them time in the afternoons to do this, and to also pursue handicrafts -things like woodworking, sewing, and other things that produce a product to benefit society.

Her approach to handwriting (copywork) is to supply the child with a Bible verse, or poem, or a favorite line from one of their favorite living books and have them copy that to 'perfection', instead of just giving them basic rhyming sentences or something that wouldn't keep their interest. Sometimes that meant only 5 minutes of practice if they did it to the best of their ability and are starting to lose interest. She always tried to end on a good note.

She was very big on narration as opposed to learning grammar at an early age. She felt that grammar would ultimately come as kids did their copywork and started reading more independently.

Science starts as nature walks and having the kids sketch or draw what they see, getting more detailed with info as they get older.

I could go on and on. Some good resources for her style are simplycharlottemason.com, amblesideonline.org, and "Charlotte Mason Companion" by Karen Andreola.

Just my two cents, though! Everyone's different!
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  #7  
May 3rd, 2011, 06:52 AM
TaraJo29's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Wow, interesting to hear your takes on it. I'm surprised most moms here don't have a philosophy and don't want one. I have wondered if the assumption that some people have (and the advice of some articles I've read) that when you want to homeschool you first have to decide on an educational philosophy is a bunch of bologna... Interesting.

I have actually been pretty annoyed at times by some "Classical" folks (IRL) who were real sticklers about the trivium. I'm glad to hear you guys are not so hardcore about your philosophies (or lack thereof), to be honest. I feel a little better about being philosophy-less.
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  #8  
May 3rd, 2011, 06:54 AM
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My philosophy is a blend of traditional classical (classical language based) and Charlotte Mason. It's a very natural blend, the core values of each being the training of the child's heart to love the beautiful, the good and the true and multum non multa - much, not many. That translates to going deep with a few of the best books rather than a shallow reading of many, many good books. But that's fine, because both intend for us to have much time free in our days to pursue individual interests so there is plenty of time for broad reading outside of school if that's what is desired.

The "non-philosophy" is a philosophy all of it's own.
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  #9  
May 3rd, 2011, 07:39 AM
Tofu Bacon
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I like the Charlotte Mason approach, but I had trouble following through with it, and just didn't have the time or creativity to devote to it. So, we're eclectic: some web-based curriculum, some living books, some homemade unit studies.
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  #10  
May 3rd, 2011, 06:24 PM
in_mommy's Avatar I am just me
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I don't have one either. I feel like I am a mixture of all of them, depending on the child and the subject. One approach for a certain subject is not what might work best in another subject and at that it varies between the kids on what works best for them.
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