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wow very overwhelming


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  • 1 Post By Frackel

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  #1  
June 7th, 2012, 06:48 AM
Doralovinmomma's Avatar and hell is just a sauna
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i am new to the homeschool scene and we havent started yet. we are going to give bub a few weeks to enjoy a break then we are going to slowly delve into this new adventure. he seems to get more excited each day and so do i. well the more i look at curriculum i realize some works and some dont. i was just going to buy a curriculum but then after diagnostic testing realized he is more advanced in some so im trying to kind of figure out what he needs to learn and teach him some of that my own way. plus we cant buy the curriculum just yet as we just paid every bill we owed. we were going to use his bonus(unexpected so we looked at it like free money) for it but we decided having power was more important than a boxed curriculum and i could make do for a few weeks by making my own. well i was doing fine until i got to science. and then its been downhill from there. every site i go to says something different for what he should be learning from second grade. and some of it on each site he already knows! i dont want to go over the same thing again! so im tying myself up in circles trying to put something together and i fear when the curriculum gets ordered i will have ordered a bunch of uneccesary stuff that he already knows. and i am completely fine with following him and what he wants to do but i dont even know what to give him as options and im freaking out. i guess this was just a ramble but if anyone has any advice or knows what they should learn in 2-3 thatd be helpful.


also how many subjects do your kids usually do? i dont want to overwhelm him but he is so intelligent and i would love if he got ahead in the process of homeschooling. no foreign languages though. at least not yet. we have to go back to basics on handwriting for english because his 1st grade teacher taught dnealian and he just hasnt adapted to it well. he learned the regular way for 3 years(headstart-kindergarden) and then they threw that at him and he just doesnt do well with it or like it so we are going to go back to original way. as of now i have 10 subjects i believe. so any help or advice is appreciated. even if you can only give support thank you for reading this thing. i typed way to fast and probably have many errors

also history and social studies is tripping me up
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  #2  
June 7th, 2012, 08:43 AM
2pinks&ablue's Avatar Chantelle
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It is overwhelming, and kind of a "try and see" process I think to finding your own way (I'm not very experienced, my oldest is in kindergarten). As of right now, we have phonics, math/numbers, health, and Bible, and then our "studies" which cover social studies, science, art and usually literature.

I'm sure one of the more experienced girls here can give you some great advice
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  #3  
June 7th, 2012, 11:23 AM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
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It can be extremely overwhelming. Very few people will tell you otherwise, and if they do, take it with a grain of salt. There are hard parts for EVERYONE. Even with a boxed curriculum, there is no guarantee you, or he, will like it all, or even that it will fit in with your ideals. It happens to most, imo. I don't think there are too many people who find an all in one and stick with it, and only it, for the duration. I commend those that can, of course, lol, but I'm not one of them, and I don't know too many who are.

I think taking a little time off completely might help you both a bit. I know the feeling of wanting to jump right in, but sometimes that can just make the overwhelming parts even worse. Especially when you get yourself all excited about something and realize it's a no go for you.

There are a TON of resources on the web, there's a whole bunch of links here in this forum too. I would skim over some of them and see what YOU think he should be doing. Because a lot of times what a site/curriculum/company/whatever says a child should be doing, isn't really all that accurate. Children aren't one size fits all, it would be easier on us parents if they were, lol. What some kids breeze right through others may struggle with, or just simply do "okay" in. You could take this time off as a time to figure out his strengths in science and his interests. I'm not personally keen on science being a "grade level" sort of subject. This last year my kids were in 7th, 5th and 2nd and they all did science together. Sometimes the girls did a bit more in-depth things, but for the most part they were all on the same subjects at the same time. If I had gone by grade level and their actual curriculum alone, that wouldn't have been the case. We would have been all over the place, lol. I didn't just do it for convenience sake, though it was, I did it because science is a subject we absolutely love and they would not have settled for less than they got.

Finding out what he's most fascinated with could very well give you a jumping off point. You can take what other sites "say" he should be doing and combine them too. You can take the very basics from each area and study/learn them, yet still focus on the areas he is most interested in. You'll likely find there are areas he's not so interested in, it happens with most subjects, imo. But if you find some he really is, then those that might be kind boring, or at least not fun, will go by much quicker. He's also more likely to retain what he learns. At least that's been my experience.

I'm a very firm believer that science should be fun, no matter what. We do a LOT of hands on(probably at least 90%, lol) and it makes a world of difference. Anything he needs to know can be made into a hands on lesson, especially at his age. You can make anything fun. Playing outside in the dirt, you can discuss what kinds of things live in that dirt, how that dirt came to be, what that dirt does for us(and it's inhabitants). Playing at the lake/ocean/river/whatever...you can discuss the creatures that rely on it and why, you can discuss how that water came to be where it is, or what impact it has on us(and this earth). Bad weather comes your way, discuss it. Talk about what rain/snow/clouds is/are, why we have it, how it gets to us,etc...

We had some issues with the water pipes here not too long ago, and that turned into almost two weeks worth of science lessons, and a few projects(they learned how pipes get clogged and what can be done to fix them without costing mommy tens of thousands of dollars )

Really science is a pretty easy topic, it just seems so overwhelming, I think, because there is so much to it. It seems difficult to figure out where to start. But I think if you find his favorites it will give you a really good jumping off point. Things tend to flow pretty smoothly after that. There should be no set time as to when a certain topics needs to be learned(ie, what age). At least imo anyway. Some topics in science are necessary to move on to others but unlike a lot of other subjects they can be learned simultaneously if needed. Not so easy with things like math, for instance, where you DO need to learn certain operations before you can learn others, and learning them at the same time will likely just frustrate.

So my advice is to take a little time off to regroup-because it will help, I've been there. Then figure out what he's most interested in. While taking the time off you can browse the net, bookmark pages you think he might be interested in, or even pages you are interested in teaching him. There are a lot of sites for experiments from preschool age on up. You don't need a curriculum to spell it out for you. As nice as it may be at times, I have found that with some subjects it's better to jump around a bit. As you're doing so, you can easily combine topics, rather than doing what MANY curriculums do with science, and learning one thing only to have a subject later on down the road cover a lot of the same stuff. That's the sort of thing that turns kids off science, imo.
Not that you'll learn all you need to know the very first time, but there are a lot of things that have way too much back and forth going on. I love the curriculum my kids have but even their science does it. I can remember science in school growing up doing the very same thing too. It's one of those things that annoys me.

I could ramble all day about science, lol. If you need any help with any specific subjects let us know. The ladies here are fantastic about that sort of thing. Chock full of information, links and advice!
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  #4  
June 7th, 2012, 11:30 AM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
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oh, I forgot your first question, lol.

My kids all have
math, language arts(spelling,vocabulary,literature,GUM,grammar/english,forgot what else fits in here),science,social studies,history(ohio,american and world),technology,home ec, piano, music(not the same as piano),foreign language(spanish currently), phys. ed.
umm, I think that's it. I never remember off the top of my head, lol.
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  #5  
June 8th, 2012, 05:31 AM
therevslady's Avatar Built for Birth
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I sort of do a "follow her lead" kind of approach. My daughter is 7 1/2 and she is on many grade levels, lol. At this young age we focus on Math and Reading at the core. So I have her on time4learning.com and I supplement quite a lot. She's in 1st grade math and 2nd grade Language arts, and 3rd grade Social Studies and Science. Every day, I wake up and she usually has her computer work completed already (she's such an early bird). Then I look at her progress and supplement from there.

Other subjects that we do are religious studies/bible, ASL, Art (she does this on her own time pretty much unless I have a particular project for her, right now she is crocheting and afghan for her dolls),music, and sports.

I started out building my own curriculum using the library and lots of resources on the internet. It was a lot of work, but it gave me an idea of how I wanted to approach things with her and helped me understand what level she was at with everything. A good start for your family might be coming up with a philosophy of education, some goals, and a mission. The biggest struggle is learning how to home school and not have school at home. My goal for the kids is that they grow a love for learning and the ability to ask questions and find the answers. I want to help them develop good logic and problem solving skills so that they can be independent learners. That way, it's ok if we get to a point where they outgrow what I have to teach, and what they learn does not depend on what I know.
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  #6  
June 8th, 2012, 11:26 AM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
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Oh yeah, art, lol, that one too.
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  #7  
June 12th, 2012, 07:10 PM
in_mommy's Avatar I am just me
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I posted to this several days ago but it seems my post is MIA. Anyway, have you checked out any of the links that are posted above to give you a guide? There is one called Lesson Pathways I believe and it would be helpful to you to get you through the subjects that you are not confident in teaching solo. You will do great though!!!
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  #8  
June 13th, 2012, 09:08 AM
Doralovinmomma's Avatar and hell is just a sauna
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i checked out a few in one of the subforums but i think only one really worked for me. i think we have figured out science but im still working on history
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  #9  
June 13th, 2012, 07:33 PM
in_mommy's Avatar I am just me
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If you have $28 to spare (the ebook is cheaper $20), I would suggest checking out Nothing New Press: All Through the Ages That book lists books you can easily find in the library to use for history. It breaks the books up by grade (all the way up through high school), time period, and even divides world and US history. It lists a LOT of books. Even has a bit of science broken down as well in the back.

Last edited by in_mommy; June 13th, 2012 at 09:36 PM.
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  #10  
June 19th, 2012, 10:06 AM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
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I know this is old, but I've been out of town, so I'm just seeing it now.

I agree that science and social studies should NOT be viewed as grade level subject matter. Touch all the highlights, learn the major events and scientific topics, and leave the details for high school. The order really doesn't matter at all, and of course, everyone has their own idea about when you should learn what. Personally, I prefer to do history in a chronological way, and take science one major topic at a time (focus on animals, focus on astronomy, focus on physics, etc. without jumping around from topic to topic during a single period of time... semester/year). That's just me, though, and there are good arguments for doing it other ways.

Try not to feel overwhelmed. It's impossible for all children to learn all subjects equally. What's important is to teach a love of learning, and the process of learning, so that children are constantly reading & exploring on their own, and they're able to learn the necessary information for the task at hand (like a job when grown). Teaching only the facts in a book by book and subject by subject manner will be so dry that a lot of the information will be forgotten. (I'm a great example of this. I can't remember most of the stuff I learned in history, even though my mom was a history teacher when I was in school.)

The subjects we're doing, depending on the child and year, are reading (phonics & comprehension), vocabulary, english, latin/greek, spelling, handwriting, creative writing, typing, math, science, history/geography, Bible, bowling, music basics, piano, art, and health
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  #11  
June 19th, 2012, 07:38 PM
Doralovinmomma's Avatar and hell is just a sauna
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well i have this idea to incorporate his new obsession of flags(its a new obsession but if his other ones are any indication it will last a few months at the very least but more realistically 7+)with social studies so he can learn about the places while loving the flag play.

first thing up for science is space i think. he seems to have an interest in stars and planets so ill start with that.

have the math set up

i had an idea for history that might make it interesting for him but im not sure if its a good idea.so im tweaking that.

i want to go back to basics with handwriting

i am going to have to figure out reading level for him then go from there.

got a whole vocabulary workbook printed out

and i have to find the bible story he used to have because even though it doesnt go by the traditional bible books, its more or less chronological and id rather go that way.
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  #12  
June 20th, 2012, 06:17 AM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
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We're also going to do flags this year. We're going around the world in a year with Galloping the Globe, so we'll do flags, countries, cultures, etc., and we'll tie in age-appropriate books to read as well.

I like Apologia for astronomy.

Here are free resources for vocabulary and Bible:

Bible Class Curriculum for Elementary, Middle School, Home Schools
Children's Bible Lessons
Bible Slideshows
Mission Arlington | Mission Metroplex: Taking church to the people
Calvary Curriculum
Primary Lessons - Old Testament

WordlyWise3000.com — Vocabulary Reinforcement for All
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