Log In Sign Up

How do you encourage reading and writing?


Forum: Homeschooling

Notices

Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards.

We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to boards@justmommies.com.

Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on!

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By BensMom

Reply Post New Topic
  Subscribe To Homeschooling LinkBack Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
  #1  
February 22nd, 2013, 10:19 AM
Erin.minus.thyroid's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,637
My son is 6 and we are doing 1st grade this year. (he'll be 7 this summer). We are really having trouble with him not wanting to read or write. He loves to be read to. We've read to him since birth, he sees us reading books, we have tons of books and we go to the library regularly. He can read but it is challenging for him at times. I think it really has to do with him not practicing it often enough and getting frustrated if it doesnt come quickly to him. He loves to look at books and he says he reads them but if i ask him to read anything in that book he claims to have read he says its too hard.

He also hates writing. Well, he doesnt hate writing but he hates being expected to write in a way that someone else could read. He loves writing stories on his own when he feels like it but he spells his own way (phonetically) and its very sloppy and he leaves no spaces between words most of the time. Ive been encouraging him to write creatively but I feel like in 1st grade he really needs to practice forming his letters properly and leaving spaces. We have the paper with the lines, we have the paper with the boxes for spacing each letter, but its still not working.

I was looking into maybe trying the Handwriting without tears curriculum. He comes from a montessori background where he did sandpaper letters, writing in sand, writing with chalk, etc long before he wrote with a pencil and I know this curriculum offers some similar techniques for little ones. Can anyone tell me more about the 1st or 2nd grade version? Is it just more repetitive letter writing?

I would really like to find something in each area to get him excited about learning these essential tasks. Any ideas on how to make it fun for this age? I feel like Im crushing his love of learning rather than encouraging it.
__________________
Erin & Jeremy
DS 6yrs old
2/11 6wks
DD born 1/3/12

Reply With Quote
  #2  
February 22nd, 2013, 01:42 PM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: In my house :p
Posts: 1,287
HWOT is awesome. I highly recommend it. I've only met a couple people over the years that didn't like it, or had issue with it. In both cases, there were underlying issues as to why it didn't work. Of course, everyone's mileage varies on that. There may be kids who hated it. Ds didn't much care for their use of a frog for the "jumping" parts. He went through the books and replaced them all with kangaroos. Because they're much cooler, and stuff, lol. At first he was very much against it, but he got used to it pretty fast. Even when he was sulking about it, it helped tremendously so I kept at it, and he kept at it. His handwriting still isn't perfect, but it's so much better than it once was. No other program, or anything, helped either.

As for the reading. I think it's best to increase the opportunity to read, sporadically. Without telling him specifically that's what he's doing. Start simple. At the grocery store for example "Hey what's your favorite pasta again?" wait for an answer..."Oh that starts with....", "While I go get this pasta sauce how about you find me the box of pasta that starts with....", "here are the boxes to look through". Make it into a game if need be. He may still refuse, just keep at it, without annoying him. Eventually you can work up to two letters, or the first syllable, etc... The grocery store is a prime place for something like this, because it's a common place. It's somewhere you frequent, some place familiar. He knows it and may likely be more comfortable there.(and not feel like he's on trial, or get embarrassed if he gets it wrong).
You could also take walks, if you live somewhere with street signs, those are great ways to practice too. Really any kind of sign. Packaging on his favorite products is a good way to practice too.
I would just randomly have him tell you what things start with, or point things out. While out driving you can have him point out signs or license plates(if he can see them) with certain letters. The possibilities are really endless. It's more a matter of slipping it in undetected at first, when you have a child that is adamantly against it. Eventually they catch on to your ways but by then, it's second nature, and they don't care.
Places like the library, which are awesome by the way, aren't good places to slip this kind of thing in. He's expected to read there, it's a library, it's full of books and that's what it's for. The same with trying to have him read books to you. It's a book and mentally he already knows his duty when he sees the book. There's no element of surprise. There is only expectation and when you feel like you've got a deficit-which is often the case when we can't do something, whether we admit it or not-you're going to be more apprehensive about those specific duties. If however someone sneaks one in on you that you weren't expecting, it's not so much of a "I can't do this right" slap in the face.
If that makes any sense. I'm summarizing something one of my daughter's therapists told me when she was really little. It wasn't regarding reading, or anything like that, but it applies to just about any aspect of life, growth, and such.

When I pulled my kids out of school in 2010, ds was in first grade and couldn't read. Now he reads at nearly 5th grade level-though he's in 3rd. I took every possible opportunity to basically do what amounts to making him read. But he didn't feel pressured, so it wasn't. If that makes sense. At first he did balk, he refused more often than not, and even got mad at me a few times. Then something clicked and he just does it. Now it's second nature. I still do it, but I don't tell him what something starts with, obviously. I send him down the isle, tell him what I need and have him get it. I should also note that I also instruct him to find me the cheapest, unless I need a specific brand, which also incorporates math. He's well aware of my trickery now, he just doesn't see it as trickery, lol. He knows why I do it.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
February 23rd, 2013, 09:05 AM
alittlelost's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,905
We keep a reading list of the books my kids have read on their own. They love this for some reason. I also told them for every 100 books they read (I have to approve the books so it's not 5 page baby books) they get a "prize" like a new toy or new game for their Nintendo DS, etc.
__________________
Thank you Jaidynsmum for the beautiful siggy!
Check out the Attachment Parenting Board for Effective Parenting Solutions.
PM me if have questions about autism, TTC gender swaying, natural childbirth, going "vaccine-free", or if you are looking for gentle discipline advice.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
February 23rd, 2013, 09:13 AM
2pinks&ablue's Avatar Chantelle
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NB, Canada
Posts: 36,142
I completely agree! Even on things like cereal boxes, or if he's helping you bake things like "can you tell me which one is flour and bring it to me?". Little things like that will really help a lot.

As for the writing, since he loves doing it 'his way' I would encourage that, but teach the proper way at the same time. Tell him as soon as he writes a sentence the way you want him to (or whatever you're writing) he can do his creative writing. I bet as he's learning the rules, you'll see his own writing showing them too.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
February 23rd, 2013, 06:10 PM
Erin.minus.thyroid's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,637
thank you for the suggestions. Sadly, my son caught on to the grocery store reading long ago. I have been doing this since he was around 3. Its hard because he is at an age where he knows just enough that he can find anything without actually reading. He looks at the pictures, he knows the sounds of his letters and what they look like so he knows what starts with which letter or ends in a certain letter and doesnt go any further to read the entire word. If I ask for him to actually read it he complains and whines and does the same thing he does if I ask him to read a book so there is no tricking him this way. He used to think it was fun when he was small (like 3 and 4) not anymore.
Really I think he can read better than he will admit but if he doesnt immediately recognize a word that he is being asked to read he will not even try. He starts trying to guess at it. I dont understand why this is either because we have always used phonics, we actually havent done any sight words besides ones that are super common in books he reads.
We also have done signs and back when he was 4 and reading new words was fun he loved it and got so excited about it. I feel like he is just being lazy or not wanting to do something I ask of him.

I might try the reward thing but i doubt it will work. I have tried summer reading programs before where they get prizes and it didnt work. I even signed him up for the six flags reading program where you get a free kid ticket if you read a certain number of hours and still he isnt willing to do it. If it were something like 100 books there is no way he would go for it.

I am glad to hear that HWOT works well for so many. I think I might get it for him. Do you think it matters if we start it now, or should I try to use it along with the school year and start in August? Im guessing if we start now we could just review some next year if he finishes it early
__________________
Erin & Jeremy
DS 6yrs old
2/11 6wks
DD born 1/3/12

Reply With Quote
  #6  
February 24th, 2013, 12:48 AM
Frackel's Avatar DOh!
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: In my house :p
Posts: 1,287
I would start it now rather than wait. Because you can easily go faster, or slower as needed. And it really isn't as "grade level" dependent as a lot of things are, even though some people think it is.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
February 24th, 2013, 06:18 PM
Erin.minus.thyroid's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frackel View Post
I would start it now rather than wait. Because you can easily go faster, or slower as needed. And it really isn't as "grade level" dependent as a lot of things are, even though some people think it is.
thank you!
__________________
Erin & Jeremy
DS 6yrs old
2/11 6wks
DD born 1/3/12

Reply With Quote
  #8  
February 24th, 2013, 09:22 PM
BensMom's Avatar Ephesians 4:29
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: The Lonestar State
Posts: 50,214
The only difference, really in the K thru 2nd books are the font size. If he's writing the same size as his peers, start with the 1st grade book. If not, start with K. When you get to 3rd, it switches to cursive (which I don't like, because it's a very boxy looking cursive rather than smooth and loopy like traditional cursive).

As for reading, both of my boys went through one of those "I can't" stages right before a reading explosion. It's similar to picking up language around 18 months, I think. A lot of babies have a language explosion around 18 months and start talking like crazy. Reading is just another arm of language, and it takes confidence. I don't like doing something in front of others until I'm confident, either.

Another thing... I was always terrified to read aloud - even in high school. I was absolutely fine reading silently, but when asked to read in front of a person or a class, I fumbled through, getting laughed at by the kids and corrected by the teachers/parents, even when correction wasn't needed... only confidence was needed. Do you know how I got over that? Reading Dr. Seuss to my own kids! I wasn't intimidated to read in front of someone else who couldn't read, AND reading something with a poetic, whimsical rhyme to it was very easy. SO... if you have younger siblings, cousins, pets, or whatever, have oral reading sessions with them so there is less pressure.
jhmomofmany likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
February 25th, 2013, 03:04 PM
Erin.minus.thyroid's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,637
Quote:
Originally Posted by BensMom View Post
The only difference, really in the K thru 2nd books are the font size. If he's writing the same size as his peers, start with the 1st grade book. If not, start with K. When you get to 3rd, it switches to cursive (which I don't like, because it's a very boxy looking cursive rather than smooth and loopy like traditional cursive).

As for reading, both of my boys went through one of those "I can't" stages right before a reading explosion. It's similar to picking up language around 18 months, I think. A lot of babies have a language explosion around 18 months and start talking like crazy. Reading is just another arm of language, and it takes confidence. I don't like doing something in front of others until I'm confident, either.

Another thing... I was always terrified to read aloud - even in high school. I was absolutely fine reading silently, but when asked to read in front of a person or a class, I fumbled through, getting laughed at by the kids and corrected by the teachers/parents, even when correction wasn't needed... only confidence was needed. Do you know how I got over that? Reading Dr. Seuss to my own kids! I wasn't intimidated to read in front of someone else who couldn't read, AND reading something with a poetic, whimsical rhyme to it was very easy. SO... if you have younger siblings, cousins, pets, or whatever, have oral reading sessions with them so there is less pressure.
thank you
i looked ahead and i agree that their cursive looks a little different. it said in FAQ that its used because its easier. Not sure if I want to do that route or not but I do want him do do better with printing.

I am glad to hear that we arent alone in the reading. Im hoping that he will find that reading explosion soon because I hate seeing him so frustrated and not enjoying his readings. I want reading to be fun and something he looks forward to. I do agree that reading in front of people can be intimidating but I figured that if it was just me listening it wouldnt be that bad. I dont have him read in front of others like they do in regular school. He does like reading to his baby sister BUT he always wants to read her books which are board books and are super short and easy. Maybe I'll see if i can get him to read her some of his reading books
__________________
Erin & Jeremy
DS 6yrs old
2/11 6wks
DD born 1/3/12

Reply With Quote
  #10  
February 25th, 2013, 04:50 PM
Veteran
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Oregon
Posts: 141
Hmmm. I was going to suggest the Reading Reward thing, too. My 6-yr-old son will read but he admitted that he doesn't like it very much (compared to his older sister who would stay up all night reading, if I let her!).
Anyway, he now earns a star sticker for every book he reads (has to be a certain number of pages per book). After a certain number of stars, he gets a prize or $10 or something like that.

As to writing, would he be interested in online writing contests? My two oldest kids (8 and 6-yrs old) have entered this one before:

Mentoring Young Writers Grades K-12

I had them write their stories out by hand before typing it up and submitting it. The prize money was a great motivator!
There are other free writing contests out there, too.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:29 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0