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Question about antibodies?


Forum: Choosing Not to Vaccinate

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  #1  
January 17th, 2009, 02:37 PM
~Annissa~'s Avatar I love my kids!
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So this is probably more a science question, but I wonder if anyone knows.

I was thinking in regards to passive antibodies. Do those stay with you a lifetime? Like for instance, my mom had all the naturally occuring measles,mumps etc. etc.... She then passed on those antibodies to myself during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Do I still have those? And if so would I then pass those on as well? I hope I'm making sense. Anyway, just wondering if anyone knew?

Thanks ladies!
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  #2  
January 17th, 2009, 03:23 PM
Martina's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I do not know, but I DONT think that is the case. We are always told that while breastfeeding babies are protected from diseases to certain point, so assuming later on they are not, well I breastfed all my babies and all 3 (I had only 3 at that time, though was preggo with 4th) they all got chick pox.
My kids had chicken pox when I was pregnant with number 4, and she is the only one my Dr. thinks (he too has no clue) might have immunity now 9without actually having chick pox herself). So from that I am assuming that only way that would be possible was only if your mother was exposed to all those diseases while pregnant, but in reality I am really curious to see if my baby is immune (not that it matters to me, only curiosity)

hmm can you tell I like thinking aloud about stuff like this??
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  #3  
January 17th, 2009, 11:45 PM
~Annissa~'s Avatar I love my kids!
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It's interesting for sure. I didn't really think so, but had to wonder since I think about this stuff so much. Thanks for replying!
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  #4  
January 18th, 2009, 11:05 AM
Tofu Bacon
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Maternal antibodies aren't lifelong; they're really intended to provide passive immunity until the child is strong enough to start developing their own by actually catching the infections (or by being vaccinated, if that's the case). Mom's naturally-acquired antibodies transfer to baby through the placenta and through breatsmilk; vaccine-acquired antibodies only transfer in minute quanties because those antibodies are actually larger insize than naturally-acquired antibodies, which prevents enough vaccine-acquired antibodies from passing to baby (the one possible exception to this is tetanus antibodies, which do seem to transfer in a sufficient quantity).

Its actually really neat how it works: the first "dose" is actually placental immunities transfered to baby at birth; those immunities are quite potent and last from 6-8 months. Breastmilk immunities start out in small quantites (acting as a "booster" to placental immunities), but as baby gets older the level of immunities increases as baby starts to depend less on breastmilk; in other words, breastmilk immunities immunities increase when placental imunities start to decrease. Breastmilk immunities last as long as baby is breatsfeeding, though there have been studies that these immunities can linger for months, even years after breastfeeding ends!
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  #5  
January 18th, 2009, 12:14 PM
~Annissa~'s Avatar I love my kids!
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Wow. That is very interesting. Thanks so much for posting that! I really appreciate it.
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  #6  
January 18th, 2009, 02:33 PM
MommaNator's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Maternal antibodies aren't lifelong; they're really intended to provide passive immunity until the child is strong enough to start developing their own by actually catching the infections (or by being vaccinated, if that's the case). Mom's naturally-acquired antibodies transfer to baby through the placenta and through breatsmilk; vaccine-acquired antibodies only transfer in minute quanties because those antibodies are actually larger insize than naturally-acquired antibodies, which prevents enough vaccine-acquired antibodies from passing to baby (the one possible exception to this is tetanus antibodies, which do seem to transfer in a sufficient quantity).

Its actually really neat how it works: the first "dose" is actually placental immunities transfered to baby at birth; those immunities are quite potent and last from 6-8 months. Breastmilk immunities start out in small quantites (acting as a "booster" to placental immunities), but as baby gets older the level of immunities increases as baby starts to depend less on breastmilk; in other words, breastmilk immunities immunities increase when placental imunities start to decrease. Breastmilk immunities last as long as baby is breatsfeeding, though there have been studies that these immunities can linger for months, even years after breastfeeding ends![/b]
That is pretty cool. I wonder when, during birth, the placental antibodies are transferred. I wonder if fewer are transferred during C-sections or when the cord is cut right away.
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  #7  
January 18th, 2009, 04:32 PM
Tofu Bacon
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If I remember correctly, the transfer of antibodies begins during the final few weeks of pregnancy and continues during labor. If the mother labors before a c-section, significantly more antibodies will get to the baby than if she had a planned c-section. The timing of the antibody transfer is what puts preemies and c-section babies at a disadvantage healthwise, compounded by the breastfeeding difficulties that are common to both situations.
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  #8  
January 20th, 2009, 11:16 PM
~Annissa~'s Avatar I love my kids!
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That makes a lot of sense. I only labored with Lili and not for very long, then they cut through the placenta due to placement. Thankfully bf'ing worked out for us.
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