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  #1  
October 25th, 2011, 12:26 PM
Repti.Mom's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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This is kinda a personal one, but when should a person be given special privileges for parking for being disabled? My kids attend a school where many of the kids have special needs, it's the 'specialty' school. There is a girl who is deaf, no other special needs, just deaf, and her parents have disabled plates. They have 1 other child who does not have any disabilities, and neither parent does. I am of course assuming that they don't share the car with grandparents or another relative that has a physical disability. I don't think it's necessary to park closer because you can't hear. What do you think?
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  #2  
October 25th, 2011, 12:33 PM
BittyBugsMama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Man, I don't know about this one. A child being deaf is a pretty severe disability, especially when you are talking about crossing a parking lot with moving cars that the child cannot hear coming. I think if I had a deaf child, I'd want to be able to park as close to the entrance as possible so that we wouldn't have to go far. I don't know, its hard to know without being in that situation.
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  #3  
October 25th, 2011, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BittyBugsMama View Post
Man, I don't know about this one. A child being deaf is a pretty severe disability, especially when you are talking about crossing a parking lot with moving cars that the child cannot hear coming. I think if I had a deaf child, I'd want to be able to park as close to the entrance as possible so that we wouldn't have to go far. I don't know, its hard to know without being in that situation.
Ditto.

And for all we know, one of the parents could have an unseen disability. In college, I a friend with such severe arthritis in his legs that it warranted a parking pass, yet he looked completely normal. I had another friend who was in a severe car accident years before and had such horrible back pain that to walk 20 feet was excrutiating for her. You would never know she had a disability to look at her. When I see someone with a placard, I assume they have jumped through all the hoops with doctors and the government to earn it, so who am I to judge whether they need it or not?
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  #4  
October 25th, 2011, 12:48 PM
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I've always been of the opinion if you suffer a disorder that impairs your physical movement, or could impair your movement at any time then you would have a physical disability and qualify for plates/tags.


I don't know specific laws on driving with hearing loss. However, I would have the personal feeling that a child with a hearing impairment would not be enough for a tag. I really believe that they should be reserved for people who have restricted movement. I could see a totally deaf person who was driving might, but not the parents of a child. A child can have their hand held to keep them safer.
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Last edited by plan4fate; October 25th, 2011 at 12:56 PM.
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  #5  
October 25th, 2011, 12:51 PM
fluffycheeks's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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From my state:


Quote:
In Virginia, drivers certified by licensed health personnel to have impaired mobility or a condition which substantially interferes with mobility may qualify for "Disabled" status.

You are also considered a disabled driver if you have

Cannot walk 200 feet without stopping or if you need the support of a brace, cane, crutch, wheelchair or another person.
Restricted walking due to arthritis, neurological or orthopedic conditions.
Suffer from lung disease or use portable oxygen.
A cardiac condition classified by the American Heart Association as Class III or Class IV.
Has been diagnosed with amentia, a condition that impairs judgment and including but not limited to autism spectrum disorder.
Has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or some form of dementia.
Is legally blind or deaf.

Information for Disabled Drivers in Virginia | DMV

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Tithen~ View Post
. I could see a totally deaf person who was driving might, but not the parents of a child.
I would be more inclined to say the child needs the plates than the parents. An adult knows to look for cars and dangers in the parking lot. A child doesn't, and one that won't hear his or her parents call out to them in case of danger is a scary thing!
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  #6  
October 25th, 2011, 12:55 PM
Poncho06's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I'm fine with who ever qualifies for them to use them. I don't think they are easy to get in the first place so I'm guessing they go to those who truly are in need of them.
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  #7  
October 25th, 2011, 12:55 PM
Repti.Mom's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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At school they park on the same side road I do, they don't even use the school parking lot (which has spots for the parents to pick up disabled children obviously). That's what made me think about it too.

I don't see why it would even be helpful, if someone doesn't see the kid get out of the vehicle, and even though they are parked in a closer spot, she walks out without hearing said vehicle it really doesn't do any good. I'm picturing a walmart type set up when I say this.
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  #8  
October 25th, 2011, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BittyBugsMama View Post
Man, I don't know about this one. A child being deaf is a pretty severe disability, especially when you are talking about crossing a parking lot with moving cars that the child cannot hear coming. I think if I had a deaf child, I'd want to be able to park as close to the entrance as possible so that we wouldn't have to go far. I don't know, its hard to know without being in that situation.
I would be too worried about not being able to hear other cars and what not.
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  #9  
October 25th, 2011, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Tithen~ View Post
I've always been of the opinion if you suffer a disorder that impairs your physical movement, or could impair your movement at any time then you would have a physical disability and qualify for plates/tags.


I don't know specific laws on driving with hearing loss. However, I would have the personal feeling that a child with a hearing impairment would not be enough for a tag. I really believe that they should be reserved for people who have restricted movement. I could see a totally deaf person who was driving might, but not the parents of a child. A child can have their hand held to keep them safer.
Umm isn't that a danger in itself? A deaf person wouldn't be able to hear honking cars.
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  #10  
October 25th, 2011, 01:48 PM
plan4fate's Avatar I may bend, but not break
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffycheeks View Post
From my state:





Information for Disabled Drivers in Virginia | DMV



I would be more inclined to say the child needs the plates than the parents. An adult knows to look for cars and dangers in the parking lot. A child doesn't, and one that won't hear his or her parents call out to them in case of danger is a scary thing!
Any child can and may ignore their parent and run out in front of a car.

I do understand what you're saying though, I just think that someone who could fall down at a moment's notice while walking (like DH's cousin with CP) would need the spot more than someone who could not hear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by K.A.T View Post
Umm isn't that a danger in itself? A deaf person wouldn't be able to hear honking cars.
I agree completely. I don't even know if they CAN drive if they have no hearing what so ever. I know that certainly kinds of impairment require no special restrictions, but I don't know anyone who is completely deaf so I don't know whether they can drive or not. But I'd think that if someone can hear with their hearing aides, they'd not need the extra spot at all.
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  #11  
October 25th, 2011, 02:24 PM
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I think it's legal in MN for a deaf person to drive. I don't know if they could drive semi truck or other commercial vehicles, or if you could be a deaf Pilot. But I do think it is legal for a deaf person to get a regular class D license.

I really don't see being deaf as a severe disability, and my DH's friend who has been deaf his whole life doesn't like to be called disabled (and I've heard that before, so I don't think all deaf people see that as a disablitity). I don't think a parent with a deaf child needs to park closer. Yes, the child can't hear cars coming, and yes they may try to get free from mom/dad's hand, but so can hearing children. If an adult is deaf and driving I don't really think they need to park closer either. I was looking at a deaf community forum (when searching for deaf driving laws) and they were all saying that they are visually more aware than those who are hearing. I suppose it is the same sense that when you're blind your other senses are more aware.
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Last edited by HappyHippy; October 25th, 2011 at 02:27 PM.
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  #12  
October 25th, 2011, 05:51 PM
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My sister has a hearing disability, although she isn't legally deaf. She is, however, supposed to wear hearing aids. She has a placard; it has something to do with the wind in the ears, I think. I'll have to ask her the next time I talk to her.
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  #13  
October 25th, 2011, 07:42 PM
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Eh Im not going to scrutinize why someone has a placard. Obviously a doctor signed off on it, and so it's not for me to judge.

My Mom has a placard and some days can walk around totally fine. She has a heart condition and there are days she walks around looking "normal." Other days, you can tell she's not. It's not for me to judge others disabilities, or their reasons for needing a placard. **shrugs**
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  #14  
October 26th, 2011, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Quote:
In Virginia, drivers certified by licensed health personnel to have impaired mobility or a condition which substantially interferes with mobility may qualify for "Disabled" status.

You are also considered a disabled driver if you have

Cannot walk 200 feet without stopping or if you need the support of a brace, cane, crutch, wheelchair or another person.
Restricted walking due to arthritis, neurological or orthopedic conditions.
Suffer from lung disease or use portable oxygen.
A cardiac condition classified by the American Heart Association as Class III or Class IV.
Has been diagnosed with amentia, a condition that impairs judgment and including but not limited to autism spectrum disorder.
Has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or some form of dementia.
Is legally blind or deaf.
The highlighted scares me. Should those people be driving?????

That being said, I'm considered a disabled driver & have a handicapped placard. But you can't tell I'm disabled by looking at me. So it's possible they parents have a disability that's not visable or that the girl has additional issues.
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  #15  
October 26th, 2011, 12:45 PM
rose198172's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My2miracles View Post
The highlighted scares me. Should those people be driving?????

That being said, I'm considered a disabled driver & have a handicapped placard. But you can't tell I'm disabled by looking at me. So it's possible they parents have a disability that's not visable or that the girl has additional issues.
The above still have to pass the written and the driving test. I feel a little iffy about Alzheimers/ dementia, but um, you realize that autistic individuals have varying levels of abilities, right? So not all autistic people are Rain Man.
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  #16  
October 26th, 2011, 03:07 PM
plan4fate's Avatar I may bend, but not break
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My dad has dementia. my grandmother has Alzheimer's. Dad drove fine for the first year after diagnosis... after that he was a hazard so mom would hide keys and finally the province revoked his license and mom had a cop friend come out and tell him he couldn't drive anymore (he was basically a 6 year old at that point, cops were cool to him).

I think that dementia patients should be reviewed at least 4 times a year by their doctor as to whether they are capable of doing things like driving and being left alone. It was like pulling teeth to get someone to evaluate dad to see if mom could continue going to work with out legally getting in trouble. Eventually he had to be left with a babysitter (yes, my 55 year old dad had a baby sitter) for her to go to work.

I have no problem with autistic kids driving as long as they've passed the test like everybody else. I assume DSS will drive one day, and he's on the spectrum. But he doesn't have amnentia...

Quote:
a·men·tia
n.
1. Mental retardation.
2. Lack of development of intellectual capacity as a result of inadequate brain tissue.
amentia - definition of amentia by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Not all autistic kids have amentia, I think (I'll have to ask) if this is what DH's cousin has.. she's 20, but has quite severe autism resulting in her not developing mentally beyond about 6 (I'd say she's more 8-10 from meeting her though). I don't think she drives though, she could learn the rules of the road, but she doesn't have the quick thinking to be on the road.


I'd think this is closely monitored.. but if you've got the capacity to drive, you should also have the capacity to walk the parking lot. I would not see this as a reason for a handicap permit. (nor would I see dementia or Alzheimer's)
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  #17  
October 26th, 2011, 07:49 PM
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  #18  
October 27th, 2011, 07:34 AM
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I qualify for, and will be getting a handicap placard soonish. I've hesitated to get one because I'm afraid of peoples reactions. I don't LOOK handicapped most of the time - except I walk with a pretty noticeable limp, and one arm is constantly bent in a T-rex fashion. I get comments NOW about how I don't LOOK disabled, and I'm too young to be disabled, and I'm probably just faking for attention. Thats the only reason I haven't gotten one yet.
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  #19  
October 27th, 2011, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePiecesofOurPuzzle View Post
The above still have to pass the written and the driving test. I feel a little iffy about Alzheimers/ dementia, but um, you realize that autistic individuals have varying levels of abilities, right? So not all autistic people are Rain Man.
Yes I'm aware my bff's son is autistic - he will never drive. My other friends nephew has aspergers. He will drive.

I was more refering to the IMPAIRED JUDGEMENT statement than the reasons for it. We convict people of driving under the influence of drugs & alcohol because they have impaired judgement but it's ok for others? It wasn't a blanket statement to label all afflicted geeezzz Way to pick at something.
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  #20  
October 27th, 2011, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frgsonmysox View Post
I qualify for, and will be getting a handicap placard soonish. I've hesitated to get one because I'm afraid of peoples reactions. I don't LOOK handicapped most of the time - except I walk with a pretty noticeable limp, and one arm is constantly bent in a T-rex fashion. I get comments NOW about how I don't LOOK disabled, and I'm too young to be disabled, and I'm probably just faking for attention. Thats the only reason I haven't gotten one yet.
I've dealt with this for years now. I was 30 when I got my placard. It used to upset me - mostly because I didn't want to be handicapped. It sucks.

But what I find works best is to just stare back at the people who are staring at me not meanly just confidently. That usually stops most people. For those that it does - I've been called lazy and all sorts of nasty things, I just say "Call the cops. It's legal" Luckily I've never had anyone say anything to me when my kids were with. It doesn't happen often though & much less since I started the staring thing.
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