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should a dyslexic person be allowed to teach English?


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  #1  
December 6th, 2011, 05:44 AM
Quantum_Leap's Avatar frequent flier
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Or, to make the question more general, should a person who has a disability that hinders his/her ability to function fully within a discipline, be permitted to teach that discipline?
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  #2  
December 6th, 2011, 07:16 AM
KimberlyD0
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Why not. There is no reason that a dislexic person can't teach.

I had the same teacher for 5,6, and 8. He was dislexic. He was one of the best teachers I ever had.

Last edited by KimberlyD0; December 6th, 2011 at 07:19 AM.
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  #3  
December 6th, 2011, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum_Leap View Post
Or, to make the question more general, should a person who has a disability that hinders his/her ability to function fully within a discipline, be permitted to teach that discipline?
To the specific question - I don't know. If they have control over their dyslexia and it doesn't affect their teaching, I could see it happening. If they are constantly making mistakes and it does hinder their teaching, then no, I don't think they should. To the broader question about disabilities in general, no, I don't think they should teach if it hinders their ability to do so. This may sound mean, but I think if you have a condition that prevents you from doing any job well, you should probably look for a different career path. A teacher that has disabilities that prevents them from teaching well seems like a carpenter with no hands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KimberlyD0 View Post
Why not. There is no reason that a dislexic person can't teach.

I had the same teacher for 5,6, and 8. He was dislexic. He was one of the best teachers I ever had.

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  #4  
December 6th, 2011, 08:13 AM
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I work in a College of Education with Master's and Doctoral students. We have an MED and an EDD in Special Education. We deal with a lot of students with visual impairments, that are deaf and hard of hearing, that are autistic, etc. Many of them, because of their "impairments' go into the field specifically related to them. I think if they're capable of getting their MEDs and EDDs, then they should be allowed to go out into those fields. They've proven themselves. Those degrees aren't easy. Some people can do it, some can't, whether they have disabilities or not.
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  #5  
December 6th, 2011, 08:16 AM
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What Tiffany said.
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  #6  
December 6th, 2011, 10:47 AM
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Team Stephanie here. As a mother with a child with a vision disability that she is overcoming & a sister who has the same vision disability & is a special education teacher, I find it sad that that people are so quick to write someone off because of a disability.

Obviously to get the degree & the job, this person had to have mastered all of the skills that any other person would have. Perhaps the disability will make this person a better teacher.

My dd is amazingly brilliant so brilliant that she had severe vision issues that went unnoticed until 1st grade and even then just put her slightly behind in reading (she has 20/20 vision btw - her issues are more complex). Even with her vision issues was smart enough to pass many of the vision test that she shouldn't have because she learned to compensate. She is also an excellent student despite having challenges her classmates don't have.

She has had vision therapy & will do more in January but her vision issue will never be 100% corrected. She will always have to compensate. But she is very intelligent & can do whatever she wants to. And if she decides to be a teacher, I know she will be an awesome teacher especially to kids that struggle because she will not only have compassion, she will have empathy.
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  #7  
December 6th, 2011, 10:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffycheeks View Post
A teacher that has disabilities that prevents them from teaching well seems like a carpenter with no hands.
But if that carpenter can do the work with his/her feet or mouth then the hands aren't necessary
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  #8  
December 6th, 2011, 10:53 AM
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Ditto Tiffany.
1/2 of my kindergarten class, including myself, had to go to speech during 1st grade because our kindergarten teacher didn't pronounce many of her words correctly. Numbers were especially bad. I can actually remember my parents trying to correct me, but I figured the teacher knew better, I guess. Most of my numbers were, like, half the word: wa, two, free, fuh, fy, sit, seb, eight, ny, ten. The school sent home a note the next year apologizing for not catching and correcting it sooner. I do not remember if the teacher kept her job or not.
She also ended almost all letters of the alphabet with the "uh" sound. So strange that she would be allowed to teach things to a child when she could not pronounce them right herself.
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  #9  
December 6th, 2011, 10:55 AM
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I don't feel that I'm being quick to judge. The OP clearly stated that it was a disability that hinders her/his ability to function within that discipline, and she mentioned teaching english. To me, that is not comparable to a visually impaired person teaching special Ed, it is comparable to a visually impaired person teaching drivers ed,
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  #10  
December 6th, 2011, 10:57 AM
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If you can't do, teach.
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  #11  
December 6th, 2011, 11:12 AM
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It depends on their abilities. DH is dyslexic and could teach English. He reads more slowly than I do because of his difficulties, but that's the only effect I've seen. I think a person with disabilities would a very sympathetic teacher that would help kids like DH learn to love instead of hate reading. However, if his dyslexia would affect his ability to teach then that would be a different story.

No one expects an art teacher to be perfect at every style of art, but we do expect them to be able to teach others the proper way. It's the same thing to me. BUT I would be seriously ticked if a teacher's poor pronunciation led to speech issues for my kid.
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  #12  
December 6th, 2011, 01:05 PM
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Again, what Tiffany said. We're basing this on the idea that it effects their ability to teach. If not, then I don't care. But if it does, then they shouldn't be teaching. And as far as I'm concerned this works across the board for me. If a person has a disability that hinders their ability to do their job, then sorry but they shouldn't be doing said job.
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  #13  
December 6th, 2011, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K.A.T View Post
Again, what Tiffany said. We're basing this on the idea that it effects their ability to teach. If not, then I don't care. But if it does, then they shouldn't be teaching. And as far as I'm concerned this works across the board for me. If a person has a disability that hinders their ability to do their job, then sorry but they shouldn't be doing said job.
I guess a need a definition of hinder

Hinder - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Definition of HINDER

transitive verb
1
: to make slow or difficult the progress of : hamper

2
: to hold back : check

intransitive verb
: to delay, impede, or prevent action

Ok so now thinking in terms of an English teacher it would depend on how much the disability hinders him/her. Does it mean that it takes twice as long to grade essays? If that's it then it's up to the teacher whether they want to spend more time to grade papers than a teacher without dyslexia. Now if it completely prevents them from teacher then they shouldn't do it. But any teacher who isn't affective in the classroom shouldn't be allowed to be there.
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  #14  
December 6th, 2011, 01:28 PM
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How long they take to grade papers, isn't a factor. It's when they cannot properly teach that factors in that I care about. Take Lacey's example. The teachers disability, caused half a class to learn incorrectly. That's not right and does a huge disservice to the children being taught by said teacher.
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Last edited by K.A.T; December 6th, 2011 at 01:31 PM.
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  #15  
December 6th, 2011, 01:51 PM
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If it HINDERS them, then they shouldn't be teaching it. But if they have dyslexia and it doesn't hinder them, then sure they can teach it.
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  #16  
December 6th, 2011, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffycheeks View Post
I don't feel that I'm being quick to judge. The OP clearly stated that it was a disability that hinders her/his ability to function within that discipline, and she mentioned teaching english. To me, that is not comparable to a visually impaired person teaching special Ed, it is comparable to a visually impaired person teaching drivers ed,
I see your point.
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  #17  
December 6th, 2011, 06:26 PM
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I think that there are many wonderful teachers out there with varying degrees of disabilities which shouldn't count them out immediately from teaching. I am not a math teacher but could not do math problems to save my life to find my way out of a paper bag. To be more applicable to my content (sine I am a teacher) I actually can not read very well out loud. I have a somewhat "disability" and stutter when it comes to reading out loud and can not comprehend what I read and write if I read things out loud. So reading stories out loud makes things go over my head. I HAVE to read it to myself or have someone read it to me. Number one reason I can not do primary school, because reading to the kids just wouldnt work with my stutter. I've gotten better but it is still really bad. But I am still a great teacher in my eyes, should I not teach because I can't comprehend what I just read when I read out loud? No.... it just means I need to work around it, ya know?

But it doesn't interfere with my teaching. I make sure my teaching isn't held back with my own problems. If there WERE any problems, I would make sure I dealt with it. I would hope any teacher tackled their problems, disabled or not! That is what makes a great teacher all around.
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  #18  
December 6th, 2011, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Repti.Mom View Post
If you can't do, teach.
I don't know if you mean it this way, but this quote is really, really offensive. I have had many talks with others teachers and it's basically saying that if you can't do it yourself for one reason or another... teach others to do it. I have to agree with them, because it's basically saying that for some reason or anther you couldn't make it at a task, so you are stuck teaching others how to do it. It's degrading.

You may or may not have meant it that way, but it's a really offensive quote and I get really riled up when others say it. I teach because I CAN do. I teach because I DO, do. I teach in order to make others do well in their lives. I teach so they can move on and move forward and become teachers themselves. They may not be a teacher outright like I am going to be, but they will be a teacher in their own personal way and I want that teaching style to reflect well from me. They won't be teachers because they couldn't do something, they will become teachers because they CAN do something with their lives. Just as I became a teacher because I CAN do something with my life... not because I "can't do."
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  #19  
December 6th, 2011, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Froggy View Post
I think that there are many wonderful teachers out there with varying degrees of disabilities which shouldn't count them out immediately from teaching. I am not a math teacher but could not do math problems to save my life to find my way out of a paper bag. To be more applicable to my content (sine I am a teacher) I actually can not read very well out loud. I have a somewhat "disability" and stutter when it comes to reading out loud and can not comprehend what I read and write if I read things out loud. So reading stories out loud makes things go over my head. I HAVE to read it to myself or have someone read it to me. Number one reason I can not do primary school, because reading to the kids just wouldnt work with my stutter. I've gotten better but it is still really bad. But I am still a great teacher in my eyes, should I not teach because I can't comprehend what I just read when I read out loud? No.... it just means I need to work around it, ya know?

But it doesn't interfere with my teaching. I make sure my teaching isn't held back with my own problems. If there WERE any problems, I would make sure I dealt with it. I would hope any teacher tackled their problems, disabled or not! That is what makes a great teacher all around.
That right there proves everything that Tiffany and I have been saying. As long as it doesn't interfere with your teaching, then there is no problem. You found a way around your stutter, so I would expect any other person with a possible issue to work around it. I too suck at math, so I don't sit down with my kids and try to teach them math. I leave that to my husband who is the family math wizard.
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  #20  
December 6th, 2011, 09:37 PM
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I am dyslexic. I have some trouble writing words out, especially on the board. I would not be a good teacher for little kids just learning to spell things.

Before staying home with my kids, I taught high school math. I always told my students about my issues. They would point out when I would flip numbers around. Didn't happen very often, but it could mess up the rest of the problem if they didn't catch that for me. Otherwise I was a pretty darn good teacher.

So if whatever disability affects the learning of the children, then the person should not teach.
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