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Teacher sprays student with air freshener


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  #21  
February 12th, 2012, 05:31 AM
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Inhaling anything that is usually sprayed in the air makes my lungs feel like they are going to kill themselves, including perfume. That's why I hold my breath when I spray things. If I was the teacher, I would have sent the child to the nurses office and every single school I attended (except for college, lol) always had extra clothing on hand for students (usually donated by parents). Just ask the boy to change and shoot mom and dad an email/phone call as to why the kid has different clothing on. Or I would have told everyone to suck it up, it's just a fishy smell and eventually you'll get used to it.
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  #22  
February 12th, 2012, 08:42 AM
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I bet neither of you send your kids to school smelling bad, either, setting him up for ridicule, so it's all very easy for you to say.

Yes, a child can have a reaction to ANYTHING.

I, for one, would rather they help my kid than he gets picked on and bullied, ---which potentially could be a long-term thing, too. Psychological issues can often be more harmful than one or two spritzes of a fabric product to try to help a kid out.
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  #23  
February 12th, 2012, 10:34 AM
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What is so hard about understanding the difference between feeding a child and spraying chemicals on them?
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  #24  
February 12th, 2012, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSLynn View Post
I bet neither of you send your kids to school smelling bad, either, setting him up for ridicule, so it's all very easy for you to say.

What? I picked up my kid from school one day and his armpits smelled so badly. It happens.

Yes, a child can have a reaction to ANYTHING. I fed a kid tuna once...she went into anaphylaxis....she's alive, but yeah, she was allergic. I didn't know because she'd never been allergic before. Should I be shot because I fed her a tunafish sandwich and something bad happened? Shouldn't I know that a lot of people can be allergic to mercury in fish? What kind of horrible lady am I to try to feed a kid lunch?

You're right, kids and people in general can react to anything, but this debate is about spraying frshener on a kid... Not your tuna fish sandwich.


See... like this woman, I only intended for the child to have a happy, healthy day...I didn't feed my friend's child fish with intent to harm her and this lady didn't spray the boy's clothes with malicious intent either. I mean, when do we just say "stuff happens, it wasn't on purpose ,she had good intentions?" Why does everything have to be assigned blame? ....Teachers CAN'T WIN these days. They are da**ed if they do and da**ed if they don't. I bet your bottom dollar there's a lot more to the story too, and that if this teacher had tried to take a different route, she'd have been punished anyway. (example: call parent and tell them they need to give child a bath----god-forbid you offend the parent; that and calling them off work to p/u is a huge inconvenience to parents that every parent seems to bi**h about it; doesn't matter if the kids are going to be picked on)

I have nothing against the teacher, in fact, I'm sure she had good intentions. I also stated my thoughts and some other options she could have taken.

I, for one, would rather they help my kid than he gets picked on and bullied, ---which potentially could be a long-term thing, too. Psychological issues can often be more harmful than one or two spritzes of a fabric product to try to help a kid out.
Kids will get picked on and bullied whether they smell like fish or not.

I went to school with a girl that ate raw fish for breakfast one morning(cultural) in 4th grade. The teacher told everyone to get over it, so we did. I don't recall anyone making fun of her and we were all still friends. Kids aren't complete a$$holes most of the time.
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  #25  
February 13th, 2012, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffy Baby View Post
What is so hard about understanding the difference between feeding a child and spraying chemicals on them?
Don't you think that what you feed your child is as equally important? With food, you are actually ingesting the chemicals that are in it. Everything from pesticides that you don't know are there to (my girls' case) the mercury that is found in fish. All can be dangerous. But you still eat it and you still feed it to your kids. So yes, it's comparable.
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  #26  
February 13th, 2012, 07:20 PM
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Not in my eyes. If someone was feeding my kid tuna and they had a reaction, it is different than SPRAYING THE KID WITH CHEMICALS and them having a reaction. Food is necessary, spraying chemicals on kid is not.
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  #27  
February 13th, 2012, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSLynn View Post
I bet neither of you send your kids to school smelling bad, either, setting him up for ridicule, so it's all very easy for you to say.

Yes, a child can have a reaction to ANYTHING. I fed a kid tuna once...she went into anaphylaxis....she's alive, but yeah, she was allergic. I didn't know because she'd never been allergic before. Should I be shot because I fed her a tunafish sandwich and something bad happened? Shouldn't I know that a lot of people can be allergic to mercury in fish? What kind of horrible lady am I to try to feed a kid lunch?

See... like this woman, I only intended for the child to have a happy, healthy day...I didn't feed my friend's child fish with intent to harm her and this lady didn't spray the boy's clothes with malicious intent either. I mean, when do we just say "stuff happens, it wasn't on purpose ,she had good intentions?" Why does everything have to be assigned blame? ....Teachers CAN'T WIN these days. They are da**ed if they do and da**ed if they don't. I bet your bottom dollar there's a lot more to the story too, and that if this teacher had tried to take a different route, she'd have been punished anyway. (example: call parent and tell them they need to give child a bath----god-forbid you offend the parent; that and calling them off work to p/u is a huge inconvenience to parents that every parent seems to bi**h about it; doesn't matter if the kids are going to be picked on)

I, for one, would rather they help my kid than he gets picked on and bullied, ---which potentially could be a long-term thing, too. Psychological issues can often be more harmful than one or two spritzes of a fabric product to try to help a kid out.
Seriously... just... how can you even compare the two????

I am a student teacher, and I not only fed my students cupcakes today, I have fed them in the past some parts of my lunch and drinks. The only thing I absolutely refused to do was give a kid tylenol when she saw I had it, but did send her to the nurse to get some or get an ice pack. That was one boundary I would not cross.

But like today, I fed my entire advising group cupcakes. If a kid had a reaction I'd feel horrible, but I wouldn't feel too horrible because it would be food, a necessary means to survival. They wouldn't die in my class without them but at the same time FOOD is necessary for survival in this world. Spraying a kid with a CHEMICAL is NOT necessary for survival. How can you even compare the two? If I walked up to a kid and said "Do you want a cookie?" and forgot to tell them it had something like cherries which they were allergic to I'd feel bad, but hey, I didn't know. Food is a survival means though. But if I walked up to a kid and said "Hey you smell" and sprayed them and they had a reaction, I'd feel like a complete loss and ****up of a teacher, because there is NO **** EXPLANATION as to why I even needed to do it... NOTHING! AT ALL! So the kid smelled! Seriously... let the kid smell, it sucks, but seriously, let him wash up, change his shirt, but febreze him? That's not okay!

I just don't see how you can compare food to spraying a chemical on a kid. Then say a teacher is ****** if they do, ****** if they don't... I serve my kids food/drinks and would feel like crap if I accidentally gave them a reaction, but it would be a true accident if it was with food. But spraying a chemical would not be an accident, it's unnecessary.

And if my kid smelled bad, I can guarantee that I would NOT want some chemicals sprayed on my kid to avoid ridicule. Other factors could of weighed in before spraying him with that ****!
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  #28  
February 14th, 2012, 10:38 AM
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^ Did anyone tell the kid "hey you smell?" That's a bit of an exaggeration.

You CAN compare the two. I don't go up to kids or spray them but I also don't go up to them and say "here's a cupcake" either. What you are talking about (food is for survival) isn't making sense in the argument...no one starves from not having a cupcake at school. Not sure you're getting MY point and I'm so done trying to even explain why it's comparable.

If you don't believe in spraying a kid w/o permission with perfume, febreze, whatever; then WHY do you think it's ok to give a food to a child without knowing what he/she's allergic to? If you think one is not acceptable, than BOTH should be unacceptable to do. You don't get to cry "But food is necessary..."Really? cupcakes and candy are necessary? I don't think so. Especially when everything these days have nuts and MANY MANY MANY kids are allergic to nuts and STILL parents send snacks to class...with nuts...KNOWING that peanuts is an allergy that has a high # of people affected. Yet that's ok? I don't think so. You don't get to cry foul for one and not the other knowing that BOTH can potentially cause a problem.

And what makes you think that if some reaction HAD occurred with the child that was frebrezed, the teacher wouldn't have felt bad?

I think people are more interested in finding fault with her than they are seeing the bigger picture.
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Last edited by GSLynn; February 14th, 2012 at 10:42 AM.
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  #29  
February 14th, 2012, 02:52 PM
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The bigger picture is that nobody should be spraying ANY kid with chemicals unless it is their own kid. That is the whole picture and the only picture.
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  #30  
February 14th, 2012, 09:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSLynn View Post
^ Did anyone tell the kid "hey you smell?" That's a bit of an exaggeration.

You CAN compare the two. I don't go up to kids or spray them but I also don't go up to them and say "here's a cupcake" either. What you are talking about (food is for survival) isn't making sense in the argument...no one starves from not having a cupcake at school. Not sure you're getting MY point and I'm so done trying to even explain why it's comparable.

If you don't believe in spraying a kid w/o permission with perfume, febreze, whatever; then WHY do you think it's ok to give a food to a child without knowing what he/she's allergic to? If you think one is not acceptable, than BOTH should be unacceptable to do. You don't get to cry "But food is necessary..."Really? cupcakes and candy are necessary? I don't think so. Especially when everything these days have nuts and MANY MANY MANY kids are allergic to nuts and STILL parents send snacks to class...with nuts...KNOWING that peanuts is an allergy that has a high # of people affected. Yet that's ok? I don't think so. You don't get to cry foul for one and not the other knowing that BOTH can potentially cause a problem.

And what makes you think that if some reaction HAD occurred with the child that was frebrezed, the teacher wouldn't have felt bad?

I think people are more interested in finding fault with her than they are seeing the bigger picture.


Actually at the school I teach at, giving kids food is the norm. I wouldn't serve nuts to begin with, but I would make sure kids aren't allergic to anything else (dairy, etc). I teach in a totally non-traditional school and to begin to explain how serving food to my kids is the norm would take a long time. But to sum it up... kids have cooking classes often. Kids teach cooking classes themselves. Today was a special day and served us a casserole (which was **** delicious). Kids can serve their Triad groups and teachers (other students if they want) food for their projects, or sell food for money for trips if they want. I bought 20 cake pops today to help a kid for her trip. This is absolutely the norm for this school... you just need the OK from your advisor or the principal if you sell food. I am an advisor/teacher, so all I need to ask is if kids are allergic to anything in the cake, and I wouldnt serve anything like peanuts to begin with. But like I said... the school I teach at is absolutely not like any other. And parents do know about what goes on in this school with regard to food and many other things that happen in the school such as controversial content, classes being canceled for various reasons, kids are required to go on trips, etc... Parents are very much in the know.

And of course the teacher might have felt bad if the kid had a reaction, but seriously, it's not the teachers place to decide to spray chemicals on a child because they smell. It is NOT okay to spray ANYTHING on a child!
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  #31  
February 15th, 2012, 03:02 AM
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Wow...I'm surprised that there is even an arguement over this. The teacher was dead-wrong to spray a child with ANYTHING, good intentions or not.

I know in NS, all public buildings (schools, hospitals, government buildings) are scent-free environments. Scents ARE dangerous. I get very ill when I am around any type of scented product, including febreeze.

Kids in my school ate stinky food all the time for lunch. We grew up in a fishing community, so it was a given... And I would think that in Newfoundland, most kids would be pretty used to the smell of fish, I know we were here.

Anywho, I am getting off topic. My point is that it's wrong, period.
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  #32  
February 18th, 2012, 07:13 PM
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Maybe it would be different if the teacher had "offered" the student febreze to spray on his own clothes. (Then you could compare it to offering cupcakes, I suppose.) I absolutely don't think the teacher should've sprayed the kid or pressured the kid to use spray. We are all human and sometimes we smell, like lunch or whatever. I totally agree with PP's who said the kids just need to get over it!! As somebody who's sensitive to fragrance, I wish more people understood how they affect others by spraying that kind of thing. If the kid smells all the time, then obviously a call home by the teacher or nurse would be appropriate.

(And, hi, I'm Hope - I lurk here sometimes )
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