Log In Sign Up

Speaking of Schools, The Blue Man School Project


Forum: Heated Debates

Notices

Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards.

We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to boards@justmommies.com.

Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on!

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By foxfire_ga79

Reply Post New Topic
  Subscribe To Heated Debates LinkBack Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
  #1  
June 13th, 2012, 05:19 PM
Tammyjh's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: North
Posts: 7,824
Epic fail?
Blue Man Group School Scrutinized As Parents Say Kids Can't Read

Quote:

The Blue School, a private school located in New York City's Financial
District, has no books and no tests and is facing an exodus of students and
teachers.

One mother complained to the Post that the school is “unstructured.”
She is pulling her son at the end of the school year, as are the parents of four
of her son’s first-grade classmates. Parents also claim that their children are
not prepared to take tests and are bored with nothing to do in school.
Quote:

If the parents' claims are true, the Blue School debacle could place its
students at a disadvantage if those children enter New York public schools after
a Blue School term. Emphasis on standardized testing is at an all-time high, as
the city's teacher evaluations largely depend on student performance on high-stakes state
exams
.
__________________
Tammy, Mom to
Abby (19), Kacie (13), Chase (11), & Jacob (7)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"...They're supposed to make you miserable! That's why they're family!" ~ Bobby ~ Supernatural
Reply With Quote
  #2  
June 13th, 2012, 05:52 PM
foxfire_ga79
Guest
Posts: n/a
Well the article and the video feel contradictory to me. I got a very negative impression from the article but when I watched the video it seemed kind of cool.
The article makes it sound like they're basically unschooling in a school.

I think they're thinking along the right lines but still need to better define their mission. Correct, you can't cram 30 kids in a room with 1 or 2 adults for 6+ hours a day 5 days a week and expect everyone to succeed. On the other hand, there's a reason kids are kids until they're 18 and that's because adults need to make actual decisions. I don't even want to speculate what my kids would do if I let them set their own curriculum and do only what they felt like doing. They might not "feel like" learning to read or do subtraction, but it's kind of important in the long run.

I think they're onto something but it still needs to be polished.
plan4fate likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
June 13th, 2012, 06:42 PM
L-SBB's Avatar Bébé Cowgirl
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 9,810
a good school can educate in an unstructured manner and kids still excel at reading (and other areas) as well as on standardized tests. But if you're sending your child to that type of school you definitely need to make sure the basics are being covered sufficiently.

I went to a similar unstructured, self-directed learning school (Montessori) through 5th grade...never had a text book (but read thousands of books) and never took a test there and studied what interested me, but we did take an annual standardized test (Iowa i think) every year as an measure of progress. When i transitioned back into public school in 6th grade i was far ahead in all graded areas, and had no issue migrating back into a structured learning environment.
__________________
Lara

Savannah Stylin!





Remembered Forever with Love
10/13/2008 (@9w2d) 10/18/2011 (@8w5d) 2/12/2012 (@4w3d) 8/13/2012 (@10w3d)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
June 14th, 2012, 02:59 AM
Tammyjh's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: North
Posts: 7,824
Quote:
Originally Posted by L-SBB View Post
a
I went to a similar unstructured, self-directed learning school (Montessori) through 5th grade...never had a text book (but read thousands of books) and never took a test there and studied what interested me, but we did take an annual standardized test (Iowa i think) every year as an measure of progress. When i transitioned back into public school in 6th grade i was far ahead in all graded areas, and had no issue migrating back into a structured learning environment.
Yes, I thought Montessori when I read this at first too and I sent my son to montessori for preK and loved it. We would have kept him there for a few more years if we could have afforded tuition as it seemed a good fit for him. At my son's Montessori, they did have some structure in the day though and it was evident that even in PreK, he was moving forward with learning.

I am a firm believer that not all school models work for all kids so maybe this type of learning style doen't fit the kids who are leaving. It does seem that there may be too much disorganization and maybe with a little revamping, it will work out.
__________________
Tammy, Mom to
Abby (19), Kacie (13), Chase (11), & Jacob (7)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"...They're supposed to make you miserable! That's why they're family!" ~ Bobby ~ Supernatural
Reply With Quote
  #5  
June 14th, 2012, 05:21 AM
L-SBB's Avatar Bébé Cowgirl
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 9,810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tammyjh View Post
Yes, I thought Montessori when I read this at first too and I sent my son to montessori for preK and loved it. We would have kept him there for a few more years if we could have afforded tuition as it seemed a good fit for him. At my son's Montessori, they did have some structure in the day though and it was evident that even in PreK, he was moving forward with learning.

I am a firm believer that not all school models work for all kids so maybe this type of learning style doen't fit the kids who are leaving. It does seem that there may be too much disorganization and maybe with a little revamping, it will work out.
This is so true...Montessori was a great model for me, but I was the kind of child who would pursue learning myself and didn't need a lot of structure - in contrast, my parents took my brother out of Montessori at age 6 because he needed more structure and he did great in public school. I think parents have to really tailor education & school choice to the child and how that child learns best/most effectively
__________________
Lara

Savannah Stylin!





Remembered Forever with Love
10/13/2008 (@9w2d) 10/18/2011 (@8w5d) 2/12/2012 (@4w3d) 8/13/2012 (@10w3d)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
June 14th, 2012, 09:50 AM
AtomicMama's Avatar CopperBoom!
Join Date: May 2008
Location: MI
Posts: 14,754
I'm glad to hear the good things about Montessori schools My son is in Montessori preschool/daycare now, and it has been such an amazing fit for him. I'm definitely interested in keeping him there through elementary school, although it all depends on him and his learning style. It works great a 1 1/2, but his could change by the time he's 5 or 6.
__________________
Amy: Wife to my Handsome Husband Mommy to my superhero, Max (3) and Luckiest Bonus Mama to Sammy (5)

Reply With Quote
Reply

Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:10 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0