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When children and pets don't mix.....


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  #21  
July 7th, 2012, 10:32 PM
angelsailor288's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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I have 3 dogs a cat ... and its near impossible to keep them apart from the baby. Good luck with that...
If I didnt trust them with Nicholas, I wouldnt have them. Not to say I let Nicholas alone with them but..
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  #22  
July 8th, 2012, 08:58 AM
*Leslie*'s Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hey... Where's Perry? View Post
You're entire post is baffling. The dog snaps at faces, doesn't bite but wraps his teeth around objects and body parts, but you will somehow talk and reason with him so he will be uninterested with the baby. OK.

You didn't know you could talk reason to a pitbull that snaps at faces?

Seriously though, that all sounds like a recipe for disaster.

I would properly re-home a dog if needed. It would be hard, but children> animals every single time.
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  #23  
July 8th, 2012, 09:54 AM
Dhartanya's Avatar Paleo Mommy-to-be
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hey... Where's Perry? View Post
You're entire post is baffling. The dog snaps at faces, doesn't bite but wraps his teeth around objects and body parts, but you will somehow talk and reason with him so he will be uninterested with the baby. OK.

I'm guessing the wraps his teeth on body parts was in reference to his play behavior. While the snapping was in reference to some aggression.

That's what I took from the post.
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  #24  
July 8th, 2012, 11:15 AM
angelsailor288's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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A pitbull is no more aggressive/dangerous than any other dog.. if thats what you are inferring Leslie
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  #25  
July 8th, 2012, 12:07 PM
plan4fate's Avatar I may bend, but not break
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We have chosen to forego pets of the non aquatic variety until we've completed our family for the reason that we don't want to rehome pets out of frustration. So many of my friends have spent thousands trying to prevent cats from marking baby things (both on repurchasing products and vet bills) only to end up rehoming the animal in the end, that I don't want to take the risk. Should also give us a feel for allergies before anyone (other than Reme) would get super attached to an animal. I had to rehome my cat because I was moving down here and coudln't take him with me, and it nearly broke my heart.


I happen to agree with Deniz... I could not imagine bringing a baby into a home with an dog that likes to play with it's teeth and snap at faces. I couldn't imagine having a dog in my home that did that with children there in general. Nothing to do with the breeds at all, it's just not a risk I'd be willing to take.
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  #26  
July 8th, 2012, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhartanya View Post
I'm guessing the wraps his teeth on body parts was in reference to his play behavior. While the snapping was in reference to some aggression.

That's what I took from the post.
I understand what she was saying and everything she was saying is dangerous to a baby/child/adult.
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  #27  
July 8th, 2012, 12:14 PM
Dhartanya's Avatar Paleo Mommy-to-be
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hey... Where's Perry? View Post
I understand what she was saying and everything she was saying is dangerous to a baby/child/adult.
Lol opps then, I misunderstood your post.

I agree sounds like a recipe for disaster. Dog AND family need serious training or dog needs to rehomed to someone who will train/socialize it properly.
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  #28  
July 8th, 2012, 12:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angelsailor288 View Post
A pitbull is no more aggressive/dangerous than any other dog.. if thats what you are inferring Leslie
Actually, they and others ARE more aggressive than other breeds of dogs. Just like there are more breeds of sharks that are more aggressive than others, bugs, wild animals, snakes, etc.

Top Ten (10) Most Dangerous Dog Breeds | Pets Do

Of course people will post how they know a dalmation and it is the most friendly thing EVAR, and how they own a pitbull and it's the sweetest thing EVAR. We all have anecdotal stories.
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  #29  
July 8th, 2012, 12:26 PM
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I found a slightly different list. German shepherds being #3 on both of them is surprising though.
Most Dangerous Dog Breeds | Dogs Most Likely Bite Attack
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  #30  
July 8th, 2012, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tammyjh View Post
I found a slightly different list. German shepherds being #3 on both of them is surprising though.
Most Dangerous Dog Breeds | Dogs Most Likely Bite Attack
Yeah, the lists tend to vary a bit.. the ones I have seen. I actually like German Shepards a lot but I wouldn't own one.
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  #31  
July 8th, 2012, 02:47 PM
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Chow chow surprises me on that list, I wouldn't have picked that one.


What makes pit bulls dangerous, and why I always get confused when people say "oh they're harmless" is because they have the ability to lock their jaw, which is, to my knowledge, unique to the breed, that means that when a dog bites, you can open their mouth and pull them off, you cannot do this with a pit bull, which is why they have so many deaths attributed to them, not because they bite, all dogs can bite, I have been bitten by a chihuahua as an example, however I picked it up with one hand and put it somewhere else, problem solved. Pit bulls are big, you can't do that with them and their jaws lock, which causes so much more damage, and if they do that on a child's face, it can be fatal.

We don't have any dogs at the moment, but we used to have a golden retriever, she passed away about 8 years ago, and she was incredible, she tolerated so much from the kids, of course that never meant that she was left unsupervised with the younger ones, but she was from a breed that is known for being placid.

In contrast to the most dangerous dog breeds, this is a list (of course, lists may vary) of what can be considered the best dog breeds for kids:
Top 10 Dog Breeds for Children

I think if you are bringing a dog into a home that already has children, you owe it to your children and the animal to make sure that the animal has a chance of fitting in and that means selecting a breed that is suitable for the family it is joining.

Of course, all animals have personalities and, yes, I have known lovely huskies, and lovely dalmations, however, do you want to take the chance?

I think animals and children are wonderful companions for each other, we have 4 cats at the moment and they teach the children responsibility, and the cats seem to love their companionship, but, just like out in the wild, not all creatures get along with each other, so you have to be smart about which animals you bring into your family.



(In regards to the list I posted and one of the above lists of dangerous dogs, St Bernard is on both, which does go to show that in the end, none of this is set in stone, so you need to use your own common sense... meanwhile, I wonder if any St Bernard deaths were due to crushing rather than biting? That would be an interesting statistic I think, deaths and injuries from dogs other than biting.)

Last edited by cybele; July 8th, 2012 at 02:51 PM.
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  #32  
July 8th, 2012, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tammyjh View Post
I found a slightly different list. German shepherds being #3 on both of them is surprising though.
Most Dangerous Dog Breeds | Dogs Most Likely Bite Attack

I'm actually not surprised by that at all. I know this is purely anecdotal, but my mother was violently attacked by a German Shepherd, my ex husband was attacked by one right in front of me right after I said "no he won't bite you," I've been bitten by one (not the one that attacked my ex, THAT one never bit ME), and a friend of mine had one that was a German Shepherd mix that snapped multiple times at her kids when they were young and annoying. This is just me personally, but I don't trust a GSD any further than I could throw one.
Yes they're genius smart, yes they're affectionate, yes the vast majority are Ok and will never bite. But that just doesn't undo my and my family's personal experiences with them.
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  #33  
July 8th, 2012, 04:40 PM
MindyRambo's Avatar Super Mommy
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I have a different perspective being someone who has had to console and try to force feed dogs who are grieving from the loss of their families. Old dogs who want to give up and just die because someone had a selfish (in my view) excuse to give up on them.

Short of seriously violent behavior in a dog, I don't believe in re-homing a dog. Don't get a dog if you can't devote 10-15 years and at least atttempt to work with any issues that come up. I agree with that poster, and I'm so sick of hearing so and so is getting rid of their 10 year old dog because they had a baby. So I guess I'm one of those childless people who don't understand

May14th2011, given my perspective on this, I have to say your situation scares me. You owe it to that dog to make the situation safe so that that dog doesn't end up being put down because you knew there was the potential for disaster, and you did nothing to keep the baby and dog safe. In these situations you can't blame the baby or the dog, because it's the persons responsbility to keep them apart.
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  #34  
July 8th, 2012, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by May14th2011
We have a very active pitbull, who loves playing with kids. The problem is, his playing is much rougher than their version. (He likes to play with his teeth, he doesn't bite, but he'll wrap his mouth around any available body part)
That being said, our current plan is to try and keep him uninterested in the baby, so that he'll basically just ignore it until it's old enough to play/get away.
If we need to keep him away from the baby for the first few months, then that's how it will be.

Now, if baby turns out to be allergic to him, we'll do what's best for the baby. But we will try training for any issues that come up, as far as biting or whatnot. (He still snaps at faces, which we're working on.)

I would never "discard" any animal to a shelter, just because we can't keep him. I'd make sure they went to a good home or a no kill shelter. I don't fault people who have given their dogs to shelters, (I used to work at one, and it was always SO sad when people had to give up their animals..) it's just not for me.
Uh, yeah, if I had a dog that did either of these things, I would have to re-home it or I would lose my foster license! This is just NOT safe!

I do agree with PP about devoting yourself to your dog for his entire life. That's the promise you make when you get a dog. You need to do everything in your power to keep everyone safe and comfortable. The image of my dog old and not eating because I had to re-home him makes me want to cry However, if the only solution that works is crating the dog all day, I think re-homing is probably a better idea, as living in a crate is not humane for the dog.
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  #35  
July 8th, 2012, 05:56 PM
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OMG I used the wrong "your."
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  #36  
July 8th, 2012, 06:35 PM
plan4fate's Avatar I may bend, but not break
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MindyRambo View Post
I have a different perspective being someone who has had to console and try to force feed dogs who are grieving from the loss of their families. Old dogs who want to give up and just die because someone had a selfish (in my view) excuse to give up on them.

Short of seriously violent behavior in a dog, I don't believe in re-homing a dog. Don't get a dog if you can't devote 10-15 years and at least atttempt to work with any issues that come up. I agree with that poster, and I'm so sick of hearing so and so is getting rid of their 10 year old dog because they had a baby. So I guess I'm one of those childless people who don't understand

May14th2011, given my perspective on this, I have to say your situation scares me. You owe it to that dog to make the situation safe so that that dog doesn't end up being put down because you knew there was the potential for disaster, and you did nothing to keep the baby and dog safe. In these situations you can't blame the baby or the dog, because it's the persons responsbility to keep them apart.

So if I get a dog at 18, a baby at 24 and babys eyes swell shut from allergies I should just keep the dog and let the child suffer or drug it? No, sorry, I love animals, but my children would come first.
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  #37  
July 8th, 2012, 07:27 PM
MindyRambo's Avatar Super Mommy
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No, I would not suggest you allow your baby suffer. That is why I would advise people to consider these things when they get dogs... Think 10-15 years ahead. When you raise a dog from a puppy, 6 yrs is a long time, and it isn't fair to the dog at that point to uproot their whole life. Of course if you'd need to re-home it make sure you find a nice home, but don't just assume the dog is fine the next day. They are fiercely loyal, and grieve for a long time after you re-home them.

I'm not saying I'm against re-homing when needed, I just wish people would think through getting a dog before doing it. I tried to quote you to say I agreed with your decision to forego having pets now, but my internet keeps crashing today.
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  #38  
July 8th, 2012, 08:13 PM
Dhartanya's Avatar Paleo Mommy-to-be
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There's no way of knowing if your child is going to be allergic or the pet isn't going to adjust to a new baby before hand. All the "pre planning" won't change the simple fact it's sometimes very selfish to keep a pet when it's just not working out.

I have 4 dogs, 3 wouldn't give a rat behind to live with someone else lol ya they "love me" but only one is feircey loyal and still would adjus to a new home, given its the right home.

Rehoming a pet is never easy (well perhaps for some... And in that case no doubt it's probably better for the pet to be else where).

Finding a good home is what's important, if it does come to that. I can only hope that steps have been taken first to address what ever the issue is that is causing the animal to be rehomed.

I dont believe most people who rehome their pets should be publically hanged, I know for me, I'm if I had to, I would not be taking that kind of decision lightly or well.

The only exception to every rule, is that if one of my dogs bites my child (or anyone else for that matter). They will simply be put down. There is a 1 strike rule, no questions asked.
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  #39  
July 8th, 2012, 09:04 PM
angelsailor288's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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I've worked with dogs for a very long time, and in that time have worked with people have who have worked with dogs all their lives. Not one professional I know has ever said a pit bull is any more dangerous than any other breed. Pit bulls are great dogs and are great with kids, as are rotties, dobies, etc. Its the people, not the dogs, that are the problem.
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  #40  
July 8th, 2012, 09:34 PM
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He's still a puppy and puppies play with their teeth. My SIL's jack russell/lab mix plays with his teeth.
As for snapping, we're training him to stop, and it's working. It's just like training him to not jump on the couch or on the bed. It takes time and patience.

We honestly thought he was bull mastiff/bull dog mix, he looks nothing like any pitbull we've ever seen. I had all the same thoughts before- "They're more dangerous" "They'll attack for no reason" but it really depends on how they're raised. Pitbulls get a lot of bad rap.
For the last 6 months, my MIL and FIL have LOVED our dog, but as soon as we told them he's a pitbull, they act completely different around him. Anytime he does anything he shouldn't (tears something up, etc.) they say "It's because he's a pitbull."
My BIL's dog snaps, and he's a husky mix. (MIL and FIL won't comment on that because they love huskies)

I'm honestly not worried. You wouldn't leave a baby alone with any dog, regardless of the breed.

I should also point out that he only ever gets rough if you get rough with him. He's not a rough dog, but if you rile him up, he goes all in. The biggest problem is teaching the kids to leave him alone. (We have 9 nieces and nephews) If they don't mess with him, he will leave them alone. He's completely uninterested in the youngest(only 23 mos), even when she's crying. She can walk around and he'll just go on with his business, ignoring her.
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