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China's New Adoption Policy


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  #1  
May 2nd, 2007, 05:13 AM
lotus86's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I don't know if this has been debated, but China's new policy for adoption was put into effect yesterday. What do you think about these new guidelines?

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China Tightens Adoption Rules, U.S. Agencies Say
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By JIM YARDLEY
Published: December 19, 2006
BEIJING, Dec. 20 — China is planning to issue new, tighter restrictions on foreign adoptions of Chinese children, which would prohibit adoptions by parents who are unmarried, who are obese or who are older than 50, according to adoption agencies in the United States.

The new regulations, which have not yet been formally announced by the state-run China Center of Adoption Affairs, are to take effect on May 1, 2007, and seem certain to slow the rapid rise in applications by foreign parents to adopt Chinese babies.

“This is absolutely going to affect a percentage of our clientele,” said Heather Terry, a spokesperson for the Great Wall of China Adoption Agency in Austin, Texas. “This will probably affect quite a lot of people in 2007.”

Ms. Terry said that foreign adoption agencies learned of the new regulations at a Dec. 8 meeting in Beijing with officials from the adoption-affairs center. Chinese officials told the foreign agencies that applications had begun to exceed the number of available babies, and that the new rules were partly intended to address that imbalance.

Ms. Terry added that China also wanted to slow foreign adoptions because “they are opening up domestic adoptions now.”

The adoption-affairs center declined requests in recent weeks by The New York Times for an interview on adoption policy. An unnamed official cited by the Associated Press confirmed that the government is considering new guidelines, but declined to discuss any specifics.

Even so, adoption agencies in the United States are already telling prospective parents about the rule changes or posting the guidelines on their websites. “C.C.A.A. has decided to both reduce the number of dossiers accepted by applying stricter standards to potential adoptive families and to increase the number of children available for adoption by improving the situation of children in China’s orphanages,” Jackie Harrah wrote in a letter posted on the website of Harrah’s Adoption International Mission in Spring, Texas.

Adoption agencies were told that China intended to increase the supply of adoptable children by creating a new charity named Blue Skies, which would focus on improving health care for medically fragile infants or premature babies at orphanages. An initial goal of this charity would be to buy incubators for many of the country’s orphanages, according to the Harrah’s Adoption website.

Ms. Terry said that the most significant rule change is the new ban against single parents. Up to now, Ms. Terry said, China has allowed single parents to make up as many as 8 percent of all referrals; the new rules would eliminate that quota. The age restrictions also have been tightened; China now allows people up to 55 to be considered.

Some of the new rules focus on the fiscal, physical and psychological health of prospective parents. People who are taking medication for anxiety or depression can be disqualified under the new rules. Couples will be disqualified if either person has a body fat measurement exceeding 40 percent (30 percent is generally considered obese). And a prospective adoptive family’s net worth must now exceed $80,000.

China will also disqualify families that already have more than four children in the home.

Ms. Terry said that her agency has already started applying the new guidelines. “We’re no long accepting singles,” she said. “That is the most significant change.”[/b]
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  #2  
May 2nd, 2007, 05:51 AM
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I think this is dumb. If an unmarried person wants to be a parent, they should be able to adopt. Who's to say they won't make a good parent?

Same goes for the net worth over $80,000 rule. Someone might not have that kind of money but still be a great parent.

Parenting is about love and patience and caring for someone else and a whole variety of other things that can't be measured in finances, marital status or weight.

I am sure there are lots of couples out there who meet the income, weight, and marital guidelines, but they would not be good parents. The agencies need to look at the total package.

The idea of not wanting to adopt a child to a home that already has 4+ children, well that one I can sort of understand.
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  #3  
May 2nd, 2007, 06:01 AM
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Are you &^%(*&$ serious????

This is a country where baby girls are routinely aborted, abandoned, and murdered thanks to their one child cap, and they are going to make it HARDER to adopt? Yeah, that makes a ton of sense

I would love to see any study that shows that children are better off raised in orphanages than by single parents, or obese people....

Oh yeah, and I wonder what standard of obesity they are going by, because according to the ridiculous US guidlines I am technically obese, and I'm extremely healthy.
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  #4  
May 2nd, 2007, 06:01 AM
lotus86's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Quote:
Are you &^%(*&$ serious????

This is a country where baby girls are routinely aborted, abandoned, and murdered thanks to their one child cap, and they are going to make it HARDER to adopt? Yeah, that makes a ton of sense

I would love to see any study that shows that children are better off raised in orphanages than by single parents, or obese people....[/b]
ITA. I think this really puts these poor children at a disadvantage. A good parent is not measured by their weight, their marital status or their net worth. I think this is ridiculous.
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  #5  
May 2nd, 2007, 09:23 AM
Caeden&#39;sMama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Ugh... And China is supposedly the next rising superpower? Really makes you wonder with these kinds of policies...
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  #6  
May 2nd, 2007, 10:17 AM
SusieQ2's Avatar Jersey Girl
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I think it is wrong and discriminatory. Eventually though, I have a feeling the policy will be relaxed. Once their orphanages become overrun and they realize the cost of the government raising all of those children they may change their minds.

There are plenty of other countries who would welcome those couples or single people to adopt children.
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  #7  
May 2nd, 2007, 10:20 AM
MrsCalhoun's Avatar Ryan Lover
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i would like to know why in the heck obese people are even a thought when considering a suitable parent?? I'm totally appauled.
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