Log In Sign Up

Supplementing.


Forum: Heated Debates

Notices

Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards.

We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to boards@justmommies.com.

Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on!

Reply Post New Topic
  Subscribe To Heated Debates LinkBack Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
  #1  
May 9th, 2007, 09:26 AM
Ms.Michelle
Guest
Posts: n/a
I have a great girlfriend who twice has said to me she supplemented with formula after two weeks of having her baby. She definately encourages it. What decisions stopped you bf moms to not do this?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
May 9th, 2007, 09:34 AM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,780
I have supplemented probably five or six times during almost 9 months of breastfeeding.

I didn't do it the first few weeks- at that time your milk supply is still getting established. If you are going to supplement, wait a few months. Otherwise it could lower your supply.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #3  
May 9th, 2007, 11:18 AM
Caeden'sMama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
Posts: 1,765
Well, here's my experience:

I gave my son one two ounce bottle of formula at two days old, because his pediatrician forced me to for his jaundice. I didn't want to, and literally cried as i was doing it... i hated it. They encouraged me to keep supplementing until my milk came in, but after i saw how much that ONE little bottle set back the nursing relationship, i refused. And of course, my milk came in, and my son was just fine... Many times over the first two months i was tempted to supplement again, because my nipples were cracked, and KILLING me. But breastfeeding was important to me, and i think that one experience at two days old helped me stay strong, because i saw how much of an impact "just one bottle" could have. So that was the only formula he ever had.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
May 9th, 2007, 11:24 AM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,780
Quote:
Well, here's my experience:

I gave my son one two ounce bottle of formula at two days old, because his pediatrician forced me to for his jaundice.[/b]
I don't know why some doctors push formula for jaundice
My little guy had jaundice too. My doc said keep bfing.

I have even seen it on tv, docs telling moms to FF due to jaundice. Makes no sense.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #5  
May 9th, 2007, 12:16 PM
frgsonmysox's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Offutt AFB, NE
Posts: 19,799
Send a message via AIM to frgsonmysox Send a message via MSN to frgsonmysox Send a message via Yahoo to frgsonmysox
With Anthony we gave him BM in a bottle starting at 2 weeks. by 5 weeks he was refusing to nurse. Thats what prevented me with doing it with Anastasia. Bottle feeding is so easy for a baby, they have to work to BF. Why work when you don't have to?
__________________
~Beth~ Wife to my Airman Chris, and mommy to: Anthony Nathaniel (8/31/04), Anastasia Fae (8/01/06), Baby C (lost on 10/12/07), David Cillian (7/31/08), Charles George (4/29/10), and Alan Christopher (2/22/12)





My BLOG - A Day In The Life of a Freg (it's a little bit of everything!)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
May 9th, 2007, 12:41 PM
bright future's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 7,283
I'm pro BF, but I'm not anti-formula... there's a difference. I supplemented with formula regularly and we're still BF at 14 months. I think many people choose not to supplement because they're anti-formula; others choose not to supplement for fear it will damage their nursing relationship (which it can do and often does).
__________________
Michelle... Mom to Kai (March 2006) - and Kodi (December 27, 2009).
http://imseekingbalance.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
May 9th, 2007, 12:47 PM
donomama
Guest
Posts: n/a
My son had severe jaundice and my doc recommended supplementing. I researched it and felt that it would help him flush the bilirubin out faster, so I did supplement him. I think it's important that you supplement the right way though. I would feed him for 10-15 minutes on each side and THEN offer him the bottle. When he went back under the lights, I pretty much pumped constantly. It didn't compromise my supply at all, and as soon as my milk came in, I quit supplementing. I think sometimes it IS neccessary and doesn't hurt.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
May 9th, 2007, 12:56 PM
Pure Innocence
Guest
Posts: n/a
I didn't supplement because I didn't need to. Kailey was breastfeeding, there was no need for her to have formula.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
May 9th, 2007, 01:06 PM
Ms.Michelle
Guest
Posts: n/a
Quote:
I'm pro BF, but I'm not anti-formula... there's a difference. I supplemented with formula regularly and we're still BF at 14 months. I think many people choose not to supplement because they're anti-formula; others choose not to supplement for fear it will damage their nursing relationship (which it can do and often does).[/b]
I completely agree with your stance Michelle. At least I know there are a few people I can turn too "if."

Quote:
My son had severe jaundice and my doc recommended supplementing. I researched it and felt that it would help him flush the bilirubin out faster, so I did supplement him. I think it's important that you supplement the right way though. I would feed him for 10-15 minutes on each side and THEN offer him the bottle. When he went back under the lights, I pretty much pumped constantly. It didn't compromise my supply at all, and as soon as my milk came in, I quit supplementing. I think sometimes it IS neccessary and doesn't hurt.[/b]
That makes sense to me as well.

Quote:
I didn't supplement because I didn't need to. Kailey was breastfeeding, there was no need for her to have formula.[/b]
Hmm.. In my g/f's case she was told to by her doctors.. As a mom, when do you know if baby is really getting enough?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
May 9th, 2007, 01:11 PM
jodi16ss's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,210
The best and easiest way to know if your baby is getting enough BM is to count the # of pee/poo diapes they have per day. Some people even keep a chart by their diaper changing station so they can easily jot it down.

Dd has been nursing for 11 months (no plans to stop anytime soon) and although I went back to work full time when she was six weeks old (and night classes two nights per week), we haven't had to supplement. Even if a woman nurses part time and supplements the rest of the time, I think that is great! Nursing is wonderful, no matter how much or how little you do it. I must say that not supplementing has been a challenge for us. There were times where I would be down to 4-6 oz of freezer stash and would have to set my alarm every two hours at night just to get up and pump... to make sure I had enough for her the next day. But.. we got through it and our nursing relationship has flourished!
__________________


Proud Mommy to Jackson (5/1/03) & Isabella (6/16/06)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
May 9th, 2007, 01:19 PM
Ms.Michelle
Guest
Posts: n/a
Would you guys be surprised to know I'm not doing it for bonding purposes? To me, bf is like pooping and peeing ~ you just do it because you have to.

I've read the amounts of dirty diapers a baby should have but what about sleeping or I've read many moms "think baby wants more and isn't satisfied" theory.. Is there any truth there?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
May 9th, 2007, 01:24 PM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,780
Quote:
I've read many moms "think baby wants more and isn't satisfied" theory.. Is there any truth there?[/b]
Many times this is a "expectations" problem more than a milk supply problem. Mom expects bfing will take a few hours a day, and then hits a growth spurt where baby is nursing ALL day. So mom assumes she doesn't have enough milk. But she does; it's normal for newborns to nurse all day.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #13  
May 9th, 2007, 01:30 PM
Caeden'sMama's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
Posts: 1,765
Quote:
Quote:
Well, here's my experience:

I gave my son one two ounce bottle of formula at two days old, because his pediatrician forced me to for his jaundice.[/b]
I don't know why some doctors push formula for jaundice
My little guy had jaundice too. My doc said keep bfing.

I have even seen it on tv, docs telling moms to FF due to jaundice. Makes no sense.
[/b]
I know that now... Unfortunately i found out AFTER the fact, and it still bugs me to this day.

Quote:
My son had severe jaundice and my doc recommended supplementing. I researched it and felt that it would help him flush the bilirubin out faster, so I did supplement him. I think it's important that you supplement the right way though. I would feed him for 10-15 minutes on each side and THEN offer him the bottle. When he went back under the lights, I pretty much pumped constantly. It didn't compromise my supply at all, and as soon as my milk came in, I quit supplementing. I think sometimes it IS neccessary and doesn't hurt.[/b]
See, all the research i did after the fact actually told me the opposite... Continuing to nurse was the best thing for jaundice. The other thing is, there's a such thing as "breastmilk jaundice" which is normal, and not harmful. Also, for me, as i said the one bottle DID affect my nursing relationship... After he had that bottle, he didn't want to nurse for the entire rest of the day, whereas before, he'd been nursing constantly. So at least for me... it wasn't necessary, and it DID hurt.

Quote:
Quote:
I'm pro BF, but I'm not anti-formula... there's a difference. I supplemented with formula regularly and we're still BF at 14 months. I think many people choose not to supplement because they're anti-formula; others choose not to supplement for fear it will damage their nursing relationship (which it can do and often does).[/b]
I completely agree with your stance Michelle. At least I know there are a few people I can turn too "if."

Quote:
My son had severe jaundice and my doc recommended supplementing. I researched it and felt that it would help him flush the bilirubin out faster, so I did supplement him. I think it's important that you supplement the right way though. I would feed him for 10-15 minutes on each side and THEN offer him the bottle. When he went back under the lights, I pretty much pumped constantly. It didn't compromise my supply at all, and as soon as my milk came in, I quit supplementing. I think sometimes it IS neccessary and doesn't hurt.[/b]
That makes sense to me as well.

Quote:
I didn't supplement because I didn't need to. Kailey was breastfeeding, there was no need for her to have formula.[/b]
Hmm.. In my g/f's case she was told to by her doctors.. As a mom, when do you know if baby is really getting enough?
[/b]
Again, it's the wet/dirty diaper thing. That's really the best way to tell. Unfortunately, not all doctors are properly educated about breastfeeding, and can give out some bad advice. Which is why i think it is AWESOME that you are doing this research beforehand. I wish i'd done more beforehand myself. I truly hope your feeding relationship with your daughter works out exactly like you hope it does... whatever that may be.

Quote:
Would you guys be surprised to know I'm not doing it for bonding purposes? To me, bf is like pooping and peeing ~ you just do it because you have to.

I've read the amounts of dirty diapers a baby should have but what about sleeping or I've read many moms "think baby wants more and isn't satisfied" theory.. Is there any truth there?[/b]
I personally think it's easy for moms to think their babies aren't getting enough, when they are. The thing is, those first couple weeks, the baby IS going to nurse pretty often. First, to get your milk in and establish the supply. And then also, they go through several growth spurts during that time. That's why supplementing so early can be so detrimental, because breastfeeding works on a supply and demand basis. If baby is getting that milk elsewhere, your body's not going to know to make it... It's hard, i won't lie... but in the end i think it was worth it. Of course it is up to you what you want to do... but if you want to be able to continue to nurse at least part of the time, it's probably best to wait to supplement until 4-6 weeks, as is usually recommended.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
May 9th, 2007, 01:30 PM
jodi16ss's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,210
Michelle, I actually felt the same way you did before Dd was born. I just figured it had to be done no matter what. What I quickly discovered was that the bonding came right along with it.. and it was and continues to be amazing. Nursing an (almost) toddler is quite an experience!

Whoever said "It gets better after 6 weeks" was obviously a man. I don't mean to discourage you, but it started to get better after about 3 months. Maybe the fact that I was working and going to school (and had a 3 year old & a husband) constributed to some of my exhaustion, but it was rough. There were days that I would nurse literally ALL day. Every once in a while... 11 months later.. we still have days like that.

But, it has been the most rewarding experience ever... more rewarding than giving birth. I am sure that sounds crazy, but it has been an adventure.. a challenge... etc.

** and I NEVER woke a sleeping baby.. Then again, my little nursling was still waking up 5-6 times per night at 7 mos of age so there was very little sleeping... or sex... in our house!!
__________________


Proud Mommy to Jackson (5/1/03) & Isabella (6/16/06)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
May 9th, 2007, 01:32 PM
Pure Innocence
Guest
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Would you guys be surprised to know I'm not doing it for bonding purposes? To me, bf is like pooping and peeing ~ you just do it because you have to.

I've read the amounts of dirty diapers a baby should have but what about sleeping or I've read many moms "think baby wants more and isn't satisfied" theory.. Is there any truth there?[/b]
This is exactly 100% how I feel! LOL!!

You check the poopy diapers and the pee diapers. Basically, when Kailey was first born, if she was crying and wasn't dirty (poopy) I'd just nurse her. It's either the milk she wanted or the suckling to sleep she wanted. As they get in the 2-3month area they will go through major spurts where they are nursing all the time and not a lot during others. Past that, your baby has their own routine and you now when they are hungry.

Don't worry, it's pretty hard to over feed a baby
Reply With Quote
  #16  
May 9th, 2007, 01:34 PM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,780
Quote:
Whoever said "It gets better after 6 weeks" was obviously a man. I don't mean to discourage you, but it started to get better after about 3 months.

There were days that I would nurse literally ALL day.[/b]


It was very time consuming in the beginning. Now it's a breeze.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #17  
May 9th, 2007, 01:34 PM
Pure Innocence
Guest
Posts: n/a
Kailey breastfeed for 3 days, then went to bottle once we got home because she wouldn't latch. But it was BM not formula. I was distraught every time I fed her I felt like such a failure! I called my LC and she gave me some tips over the phone. After one more bottle feeding I used her tips and Kailey has been breastfeeding ever since. I LOVE my LC It got MUCH easier after 3 weeks.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
May 9th, 2007, 01:37 PM
jodi16ss's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,210
Not having to supplement was very important to me (I only breastfed my first child for a few weeks). With this baby, I gave away all of the formula samples that were mailed to me, kept no bottles at the house, and basically educated myself beforehand. I knew what to do in case of sore nipples, engorgement, breast refusal, low supply, etc. I bought fenugreek capsules before returning to work IN CASE of supply issues.
__________________


Proud Mommy to Jackson (5/1/03) & Isabella (6/16/06)
Reply With Quote
  #19  
May 9th, 2007, 01:41 PM
Pure Innocence
Guest
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Not having to supplement was very important to me (I only breastfed my first child for a few weeks). With this baby, I gave away all of the formula samples that were mailed to me, kept no bottles at the house, and basically educated myself beforehand. I knew what to do in case of sore nipples, engorgement, breast refusal, low supply, etc. I bought fenugreek capsules before returning to work IN CASE of supply issues.[/b]
I educated myself SO MUCH for my first baby (well, my only right now lol) so when she wouldn't latch I felt like such a failure. One day I was just like d@mnit I didn't spend all those hours reading about this crap to have this happen to me!!!!!! I got her back to bfing. LOL!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
May 9th, 2007, 01:46 PM
donomama
Guest
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Quote:
My son had severe jaundice and my doc recommended supplementing. I researched it and felt that it would help him flush the bilirubin out faster, so I did supplement him. I think it's important that you supplement the right way though. I would feed him for 10-15 minutes on each side and THEN offer him the bottle. When he went back under the lights, I pretty much pumped constantly. It didn't compromise my supply at all, and as soon as my milk came in, I quit supplementing. I think sometimes it IS neccessary and doesn't hurt.[/b]
See, all the research i did after the fact actually told me the opposite... Continuing to nurse was the best thing for jaundice. The other thing is, there's a such thing as "breastmilk jaundice" which is normal, and not harmful. Also, for me, as i said the one bottle DID affect my nursing relationship... After he had that bottle, he didn't want to nurse for the entire rest of the day, whereas before, he'd been nursing constantly. So at least for me... it wasn't necessary, and it DID hurt.
[/b]
Like I said, my milk hadn't come in yet, he was getting nothing but colostrum. He needed fluids to flush out the bilirubin. It wasn't "breastmilk jaundice," he had severe jaundice to the point of being hospitalized and put under the lights. Do you remember what your son's bilirubin level was?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:44 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0