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PT for Toe Walking?


Forum: Learning Disabilities and Special Education

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  #1  
February 20th, 2008, 08:32 AM
outnumbered's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Hi all.

Hunter does a lot of toe walking still. With that he still flaps his hands a bit. I found the following and was wondering if any of you who have kids that toe walk did any of it and/or you got your child PT for it.

http://www.autism.org/toewalk.html

Toe Walking

Written by Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D.
Center for the Study of Autism, Salem, Oregon

Toe walking is quite common in young children, age 3 and younger; but toe walking, especially in children 5 years and older, is often associated with neurological immaturity. Many parents and professionals are not aware of the various interventions used to treat toe walking. The following interventions are listed from least to most invasive.

1) Physical exercises are sometimes used to stretch out the tendon in order to reduce toe walking, but this treatment has had minimal success.

2) A dysfunctional vestibular system, a common problem in autism, may be responsible for toe walking. The vestibular system provides the brain with feedback regarding body motion and position. It may be possible to reduce or eliminate toe walking by providing the person with therapeutic vestibular stimulation (e.g., being swung on a glider swing).

3) Toe walking may be directly or indirectly related to a visual-vestibular problem. I have conducted several research studies with Melvin Kaplan, O.D. at the Center for Visual Management in Tarrytown, New York. While conducting these studies, I observed four individuals who were toe walkers. In each case, their toe walking was eliminated within seconds after the child began wearing prism lenses.


Description of program. Prism lenses displace the person’s field of vision up, down, left or right. Dr. Kaplan and other developmental optometrists have developed nonverbal assessment procedures to determine the correct direction and degree of displacement for the prism lenses. Unlike other interventions for autism, changes in attention and behavior are observable immediately after the person begins to wear the lenses. The use of prism lenses is part of a ‘vision training’ program. The program typically lasts for one year and involves wearing prism lenses and performing daily visual-motor exercises. After the program is completed, the person no longer needs to wear the prism lenses.
(4 & 5) Casting is another intervention used to stop toe walking. This procedure involves wearing a cast to stretch out the tendon. In most cases, the cast is applied every two weeks for a total of 6 to 8 weeks. Another treatment involves surgery. Long-leg casts are then worn for six weeks and followed by night splinting for several months.

It is important for parents to learn as much as possible about treating toe walking before selecting an appropriate intervention for their child. When making a decision about any treatment, parents should take into account the treatment’s effectiveness, safety and cost.

Here is a link to different sensory areas... how to know if its a problem and ideas or suggestions to do to help... How to know if its sensory / What to do

ALSO I see in the integrations catalog a product called Stepping Stones - N - Stilts it says Fantastic for low tone children or those that toe walk. Not only works on dynamic balance, but keeps the back leg muscles from shortening and strengthens ankles. Just slip the straps out of the stilts and create the most fun "stone" path with 6 stones rocker side up or rocker side down. 3 pair of stilts. $28.99 a set. C 1-26824-142

TRAMPOLINES I would also think would help with using the whole foot and developing the muscle for walking flat footed..... you can buy small exercise ones at walmart, target, even sporting good stores for around $20 - $30

Also try peddaling a bicycle trycicle exercise bike.....

Moon Walkers (the description in the integrations catalog - www.integrationscatalog.com or 1-800-622-0638 says) best fun in galaxy and calms by getting all the leg muscles to really work out ..... even when walking. The curved soles are great for children who have been toe walkers. Enjoy fun skipping! Big Walks! Giant Leaps! Slip over bare feet socks, and some shoes Indoors / outdoors c 1-04698-142 $19.99 / pair

heres a link to a different catalog but excat same product http://www.specialkidszone.com/Produ...asp?ProductID= 1718
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  #2  
February 20th, 2008, 08:49 AM
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My son went through several months of PT for toe-walking. It stretched his muscles slightly, but not enough to make any difference. He is 11 though - maybe it would have helped if he had gone through therapy when he was younger. I don't know.
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  #3  
February 20th, 2008, 12:33 PM
outnumbered's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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My son is 10 and he does it a lot. It's not so cute anymore. With him toe walking, one hand flapping and the other hand fingering a small toy...he sticks out.
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Jump into Spring! BPAFreeKids.com wishes you good times and warmer weather!

I am a breastfeeding, cloth diapering, co-sleeping, no crying it out, baby wearing mama of 3 boys, one of which has autism. Meet my boys here (having technical difficulties with my website). My blogs are On Top of Mt. Laundry and The Cache Checkers.

Most frequently found at the Cloth Diapering board but also a member of the July '05 PR, Austim board and the Choosing Not To Vaccinate board.

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  #4  
February 20th, 2008, 12:55 PM
Tammyjh's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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My 8 yr. old had PT for toe walking but only for 6 weeks because she did so well with it. Her muscles weren't overly tight but the orthopedic dr. still thought she would benefit. She's toe walked since she learned to walk but can walk flat footed when we remind her. We keep at her because if the muscles don't get an adequate stretch, they shorten and its extremely hard to "lengthen" them again once thats happened.

My oldest has been in PT since she was about 6 months old because she has such tight muscles on her left side. She would toe walk on one side which gave her a funny looking limp. Stretches weren't really useful, and bracing only worked for a short period of time. We did the botox injections once but w/ all the bad press about it lately, I doubt we would do it again. Ended up with a heel cord lengthening surgery which helped immensly. She still has a slight limp and is "supposed" to wear her brace every day because her foot turns in at a funny angle due to the surgery. She doesn't wear it every day and it can turn into quite a battle. Anyway, I'm sure thats more than you all wanted to know so I'll end here
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  #5  
February 21st, 2008, 12:24 PM
fiefer87's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Fortunately, we haven't had any issues with toe walking with Alexis, but with everything else, I am just grateful that was one thing we did not have to go through.
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