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Forum: Children with Special Needs

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  #2  
July 26th, 2011, 07:30 PM
Ever's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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So she's not making any kinds of sounds at all? Does she initiate "conversations" with you when she wants/needs something or wants to show you something?

I'm not sure what it could be, but one thing I know about our kids is to never give up hope. Some parents I know have told me their children started talking much MUCH later. It doesn't happen often but it does happen.

Have any other tests been done?
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  #4  
July 27th, 2011, 06:42 AM
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Have they done speech therapy? Where they make sure that everything works right such as muscles, tongue movements, jaw movements, etc? She can make sounds but she can't form words right? I would push for a brain scan and maybe a neuro consult to make sure that everything is "wired" correctly. Have you tried signing? If she can't form the words maybe it could ease her frustration if she could communicate through signing to you. :/
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  #5  
July 27th, 2011, 07:54 AM
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It's great that she is trying to sound out the words and understands everything. That's really important. I would definitely push for a brain scan as well. And sometimes you really do have to push to get what you need for your kids!

I'm not sure where you live but we have Early Intervention Services here where they help advocate for us and help us get Kailyn into therapies she needs, funding, etc. I just finished the Hanen Program for speech and language which I found pretty helpful. Right now we're also starting to work on picture exchange which might be great for your daughter since she understands everything. It's another way for her to "talk" to you, as is signing.

I hope you get some answers very soon.
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  #6  
July 27th, 2011, 07:57 AM
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I also found these links. I don't know if this fits or not but maybe it can give you a head start on finding the right place to help her...

What is Childhood Apraxia of Speech? - Apraxia-KIDS

Family Start Guide: How is CAS Different Than A Speech Delay? - Apraxia-KIDS
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  #7  
July 27th, 2011, 08:16 AM
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I was thinking apraxia too.

Has her hearing been tested? Some kids, although they can hear, aren't hearing properly and then don't learn to make the words themselves because of that.

My 4 year old doesn't speak, but he has autism and doesn't respond much either.

I'd keep pushing for tests. There are many things that could cause it and many ways to help her find her voice. Speech therapy was a BLESSING for my daughter who was 20 months before she ever spoke one word (momma).
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  #9  
July 27th, 2011, 09:37 AM
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That's a strange test for autism, but I'm not totally confident on definitive ways to test since every child is so different.

It really sounds like it is only her speech that worries you and if she has no other things going on with her, I wouldn't think autism. Just because a child does not talk, does not mean that child is autistic.

How did she tell the teacher what the toys were? Did she play appropriately or sign or what?
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  #11  
July 27th, 2011, 01:45 PM
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It does not sound like a speech delay. In one of the links I posted a speech delay is found in sync more or less with overall development. If she can understand speech, follow directions, etc than it is not simply a speech delay... :/
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  #12  
July 27th, 2011, 03:45 PM
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My son is 3 and doesn't talk. He also has been tested for everything under the sun. He also understands everything and does what you ask, can identify toys, and colors. He makes hummng noises instead of words. We took him to the Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education Department here in Oregon and now he is in a class twice a week for 2 hours each day. They play with toys, sing songs, and get the kids interacting with words. He still doesn't talk but now we have noticed him trying -making more sounds such as ones you hear from a 1 year old. Check with your state-I googled Early Special Education in Oregon. I have high hopes for this program, but I have been told it can take up to 2 years for them to start speaking.
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  #13  
July 28th, 2011, 09:37 AM
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Hi! Sorry I seem to be late, but both of my children have expressive speech delays. They can both understand and follow direction, but can not verbalize nearly to age level.

There is no real test for apraxia, so any therapist may be hesitant to even say that word around a child as young as 3. We've struggled with that a lot. Apraxia is the suspected culprit with my older daughter and having a "bad model" is the culprit with my younger.

My daughter is 3.5. She has problems beyond just speech delay but we were told in November that because she didn't talk at that point, that she never would. I felt like you, that hearing the words "mama" was a pipe dream and I started to give up. 5 months later she spoke, and as of right now she's got about a dozen words and is picking up fast. Apraxic children often struggle to form words until much later than other kids, but do often learn to speak.

Don't give up.

Do you feel like she can purposefully create specific sounds?? That is a big difference as to her prognosis. Carrie didn't speak, but if I asked her to make an "m" sounds she could, it took a while, but she could do it. She also understood language, those two things showed me that she would EVENTUALLY be able to put the sounds together to form words. I was right, the doctor was wrong.

Your experience with autistic testing sounds very similar to ours, same test, same answers Basically that she's just too social to be considered on the spectrum
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Last edited by C&K'sMama; July 28th, 2011 at 09:39 AM.
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  #16  
July 30th, 2011, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trulyblessed View Post
Thank you for your reply Everything you said is exactly how I feel. My daughter can say some words but hasn't said a sentence yet and she hums the words she can't say. When they first evaluated her they did a scoring and it showed that she probably has Apraxia. I pray every single night my daughter just wakes up one morning and just never shuts up. I can't wait for her next evaluation. Thank you for sharing your story about your daughter with me. It helped a lot and that's exactly how it is with my daughter as well. All the best for your baby girl.
Thanks! I hope you find answers with your daughter. The prognosis that I'm given the most on apraxia (if she has it, and for kids with only apraxia) is that most cases the person is never reaches "typical" language, but by 7 their vocabulary is near age appropriate.

A technique that has REALLY helped with us, is that we've begun approaching her first words in a different way. The basic approach is to work on simple effective words and build from there. I didn't' take that approach with Carrie, but my altered version has REALLY been working. Maybe it'll work for you. The words that her Sp were working on were like "mama", "dada", "ball"... things that we could give her immediately to reinforce the language, but since I felt like Carrie already "got" the concept of language I turned my focus to sounds she can say. She was good at "m", so we very slowly said "ma-ma", overly enunciated and after every time we'd back off and tell her "you do it" or "your turn". Within a couple months she was imitating me. Instead of moving on to other productive words, I tried using similar words (I figured speech was already working on the easy ones), so we worked on "mine" and "more" (sounds more like "mo" but it's consistent). She picked up FAST on those words but was having no luck with the simple words that speech was pushing. So I heard her babble a "b" sound and started working on it. Within a week or so of over enunciation she could say "bye", we moved on to "bite" (for a bite of food) and one day we were playing with a my friend's child and they were calling my dog. Carrie, out of no where, started calling the dog's name. I could have cried. (It's Becca). Her 5th word was a 2 syllable word that wasn't repetitive (like mama, dada, bye bye, etc). She's just begun the letter "p" but we're having a LOT more luck pushing sounds that we know she can make, rather than trying to get her to say things she comes in contact with a lot (the typical way to approach emerging language).

I don't know if this is a technique that you're interested in giving a shot, but you may want to consider it. It's made a HUGE difference in Carrie's language and given her more confidence to try to speak.

I saw that you were looking into early intervention, just to be prepared, many states don't do intervention after the child's 3rd birthday instead they send them to a public school program (we've lived in TX, OK, TN, KY, and NC and all of them have that policy, it's the "norm" but there are of course exceptions). just fyi in case you didn't know and it came as a surprise when they tell you to get eval'd by the school.
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Last edited by C&K'sMama; July 30th, 2011 at 07:29 PM.
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  #17  
August 2nd, 2011, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trulyblessed View Post
When the teacher would ask her where the doll was, she would pick it up. When he told her to pick up the bottle and feed the baby, she did. When he asked her to point to the doll's shoes, she did. She knows body parts, she knows some colors, some numbers, she loves to hear me count.
My almost 3 year old has autism. He can do all of this. He is also verbal and he likes to play with/near other children. Just like not speaking doesn't automagically mean autism, being social and understanding some language doesn't automagically mean NOT autism.

It helps our family a lot to shrug off the negativity about the word autism and all that could go with it. Our kid's just who he is, and he's a lot like us.. we're open about it and cheerful. Nobody who knows us well pities us; just the strangers who hear the "A" word and think that we've faced the death of our future. Definitely not so! And it's great to hear that your daughter is interested and trying to talk. I wish you continued success.
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