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Poor weight gain


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  #1  
October 2nd, 2008, 09:34 AM
*tacii's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Hi, I hope you don't mind me lurking around here. My LO doesn't have a CHD but I was just curious if your heart child had difficulties gaining weight. My little man has been small since birth (5lbs 2oz at 38 weeks). He's currently 16 months and weighs 17lbs. He's generally a good eater.. takes in more calories in a day than he probably needs, he just doesn't seem to put on the weight though. I find he sweats when he's drinking from his bottle, he has since birth. Probably just a sweaty baby though I don't know why I'm posting here, he has no detectable murmur and had no abnormalities to suggest CHD on prenatal ultrasounds. Guess I'm just trying to eliminate potential reasons why he's small. Anyways, thanks for listening to my babble.
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  #2  
October 2nd, 2008, 10:36 AM
Girl_interrupted
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If you are concerned, I'd have the doc check it out. My daughter also has no murmur, but she only had a three chambered heart (totally missing the wall between her lower two chambers) and was missing her pulmonary tissue altogether-no valve, no artery. She was small, sweated a lot (still does), had stinky feet, perpetually slept only on her stomach, and was dark complected even though my husband and I are both light in color. It's possible-though even I say not probable-that it's a heart condition. I had several U/S too...

I'd say ask the doc to do a CBC (if there is a heart condition, generally baby's iron will be out of whack).
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  #3  
October 3rd, 2008, 09:42 AM
rabbitranch's Avatar est. 2000
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: central FL
Posts: 13,439
Hmm....Coral was and is small but I suspect that's more from prematurity than the CHD. Although, the majority of preemies I know have gained weight much faster than her unless they had some sort of additional issue like chronic lung disease. So, I don't know if it contributes or not.

Oh, and for comparison Coral is 19 months and still fits well in 12 month clothing, a size 3 diaper, and size 3 shoes. My older kids are giants for their age so it's really weird having a little little one!
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  #4  
October 3rd, 2008, 10:05 AM
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Hailey is just tall and skinny. Both DH and I were like that as a child. She has always followed the 10% growth curve. What "they" say is the child should double the weight by 6 months and triple by the end of the first year. So, according to his birth weight, at 1 year he should be around 15 pounds. So 17 pounds doesn't sound bad, for 16 months. Although there are many medical problems that can result in poor weight gain. So it is always worth while to check it out if you are concerned or have a family history. Some kids are just genetically smaller.

I never knew tummy sleeping or sweety can be a result of a heart condition though.

Quote:
Oh, and for comparison Coral is 19 months and still fits well in 12 month clothing, a size 3 diaper, and size 3 shoes. My older kids are giants for their age so it's really weird having a little little one![/b]
How long do kids wear a size 3 diaper?! Hailey is potty trained, but we use/used cloth diapers [still use em at night]. She had an accident at church a few weeks ago and the size 3 are a brand that bothers her, no size 4, so I had to use a size 2. It fit snug, but it worked to get us through food shopping and lunch.
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  #5  
October 3rd, 2008, 10:46 AM
rabbitranch's Avatar est. 2000
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Quote:
Hailey is just tall and skinny. Both DH and I were like that as a child. She has always followed the 10% growth curve. What "they" say is the child should double the weight by 6 months and triple by the end of the first year. So, according to his birth weight, at 1 year he should be around 15 pounds. So 17 pounds doesn't sound bad, for 16 months. Although there are many medical problems that can result in poor weight gain. So it is always worth while to check it out if you are concerned or have a family history. Some kids are just genetically smaller.

I never knew tummy sleeping or sweety can be a result of a heart condition though.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE
Quote:
Oh, and for comparison Coral is 19 months and still fits well in 12 month clothing, a size 3 diaper, and size 3 shoes. My older kids are giants for their age so it's really weird having a little little one![/b]
How long do kids wear a size 3 diaper?! Hailey is potty trained, but we use/used cloth diapers [still use em at night]. She had an accident at church a few weeks ago and the size 3 are a brand that bothers her, no size 4, so I had to use a size 2. It fit snug, but it worked to get us through food shopping and lunch.
[/b][/quote]

Coral always sleeps on her tummy but I think that's from reflux and not CHD. Coral can still fit in size 2's, they just leak at night if she pees overly much. During the day 2's are fine. Most babies around her adjusted age are in anywhere from 4's to 6's. Babies her actual age all seem to be in size 5 or 6. My older kids were in 5 or 6 at this age.
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  #6  
October 3rd, 2008, 04:01 PM
Girl_interrupted
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When speaking about an undiagnosed (therefore uncontrolled and possibly CHF person), it's very common for them not to sleep or even be able to sleep on their backs. It complicates the CHF. Maddie could have died from sleeping on her back.

Being a "sweat head" is also a symptom of CHD/heart problems in general. When a person is having a heart attack, often times they'll sweat even if it's cold. It just happens. *shrugs*


Here's a great site for reading: http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/health/...a/signs/chf.htm


Quote:
Congestive heart failure symptoms

Symptoms are different for children of different ages. In babies, regardless of the cause of congestive heart failure, the end result of significant congestive heart failure is poor growth. This is because in babies with congestive heart failure a significant amount of energy is used up by the heart as it works harder to do its job.

In addition, as the lungs fill with fluid, it becomes more difficult for babies to breathe and they will use more of the muscles of their chest and belly to compensate.

These babies will also have a harder time eating and may not eat as fast or as well as other babies. They can become very sweaty with feedings because of the extra work needed to eat.

Some babies work so hard that they wear themselves out and sleep more or have less energy than babies without heart problems, although this is hard to gauge as different babies will have different sleeping habits regardless of whether or not they have heart problems.

All of this extra work will result in the baby's inability to take in enough nutrition to grow, which is an infant's top priority in the first year of life.

These symptoms will not usually occur as soon as the baby is born. This is because the pressures in the lungs of all babies are equal to the pressures of the rest of the body when babies are first born.

It can take anywhere from two days to eight weeks before the pressures in the lungs fall to normal. Babies with ventricular septal defects or other sources of extra flow to the lungs can often feed and grow as expected for all babies in the first one to two weeks of life because their high pressures in the lungs will prevent excessive blood flow to the lungs.

The symptoms of poor growth -- difficulty with feeds and fast breathing -- will gradually appear during the first or second week of life as the pressures in the lungs begin to fall and blood flows across the hole into the lungs.

Babies with obstruction to blood flow out of the left side of the heart or a weak heart muscle may have these symptoms much sooner, sometimes in the first few days of life depending on the degree of obstruction or weakness.

Older children with congestive heart failure are beyond the time of rapid growth and therefore do not have major growth problems like infants. Their symptoms are usually related to their inability to tolerate exercise. They become short of breath more quickly compared to their peers and need to rest more often.

Shortness of breath can occur even with minimal exertion, such as climbing stairs or taking a walk if the heart failure is severe. These children will often lack energy when compared to their friends, although this may be harder to determine because all children have different levels of energy.

In children with heart failure, passing out during exercise may be very serious and needs to be evaluated immediately. Appetite may be poor when heart failure is severe and weight loss or lack of weight gain can be seen even in older children.

Some children will retain fluid and will actually gain weight with heart failure and appear puffy. As it is harder to determine parameters for heart failure in older children, it is important to look for change in exercise capabilities or progression of symptoms with time.[/b]


Although I find it somewhat comical that they say it'll be noticed in the first couple weeks.
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  #7  
October 3rd, 2008, 04:10 PM
MellieB's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Melbourne, Aust.
Posts: 64,110
I too would get it checked if your worried. At 16 months Jassie was only about 18 pounds and perfectly healthy.
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