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Biggest name pet peeve(s)??


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  #1  
December 23rd, 2007, 05:43 PM
LvMyLaxKid's Avatar Super Mommy
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I think one of my biggest pet peeves is when names don't flow. I HATE it when there are two vowel sounds together, making it very awkward to say the name. For instance:

Emily Elizabeth (EmilEE EElizabeth)

Olivia Evelyn (OliviUH EHvelyn)

When you say names like this out loud, they're kind of awkward, and hard to say.

Or like:

Micah Oliver
Jonah Edward
Isaiah Aaron

It's not that they're bad names, just kind of awkward. But it's probably just me! LOL

There are so many different naming styles out there, and I really don't mind whether somebody wants to use a classic, trendy, unique, common etc. I mostly care about the sound and flow. :>)
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  #2  
December 23rd, 2007, 07:58 PM
ibdancn's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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My biggest pet peeve is the ultra popular names. I'm a dance teacher so I HATE having 50 different Caitlyns, Haleys, Hannahs, Trinitys, Rilees, and Savannahs. Plus it gets confusing cuz they all spell them differently. Don't get me wrong, most of these names I really like. Maybe it's because my name is Jessica and I was born in the '80s. Talk about being overused!!!
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  #3  
December 23rd, 2007, 08:36 PM
JediRach's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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I hate names that end with the same sounds
Alexander Conner would be an example
I like both of the names but its too monotonous.
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  #4  
December 23rd, 2007, 08:52 PM
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My biggest pet peeves would be ultra popular names like Jessica mentioned and also names that sound cute as a baby but i cannot for the life of me picture on an adult. For example names like Cooper or Spencer. they are cute on babies but I can't see either on a 20-30 year old guy.
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  #5  
December 23rd, 2007, 09:40 PM
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My pet peeves are:

Misspelled names. I think it would be annoying to have to keep telling people how to spell my name because it's spelled "creatively." The misspellings don't look creative anyway, they look silly. I especially hate when the misspelling becomes more popular than the correct one (such as Kaitlyn/Katelyn being more common than Caitlin).

Boy names on girls. For one thing, it means that people will constantly mistake her for a boy, calling her "sir" on the phone and putting "Mr." on her mail. It also mean she'll have to act really girly, all the time, to avoid being thought of as masculine. If she isn't really pretty and feminine, it will just be a pain. Besides, no one would use a girl name for a boy, so why use a boy name for a girl?

The idea that misspelling a male name, especially by replacing the vowels with Ys makes it feminine. Spelling Cameron as Camryn does not make it feminine, it makes it misspelled.

Using countries, tribes, etc. as names (India, China, Dakota, Ireland, Cheyenne, etc.). It comes off as trying to sound exotic, and some people find it offensive.

Nicknames used as full names, and other childish/cutesy names like Charlie, Rylee, Marley, etc. They sound like dog names, and they will not sound good at all when the child is an adult and wants to be taken seriously.


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  #6  
December 24th, 2007, 05:06 AM
LvMyLaxKid's Avatar Super Mommy
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Well, I'll have to agree with the boy names for girls thing. I have a Parker, and I'm starting to see girl Parkers. The other day this lady asked what Parker's name was, and when I told her, she looked puzzled, and said, "Ohhh......I have a niece with that name!" I wanted to say, "Well, thats nice, but it was a BOY name first!" I think it's going to be annoying if he gets to school, and there are more girl Parker's than boy Parkers........


And I get annoyed by the really popular names, that you hear constantly. They may be really cute names, but I get so tired of hearing them! Such as Mackenzie, Kaitlyn, Emma, Emily etc. I actually like names that follow the "trendy" formula, as long as the name itself isn't overused. For example, I really like the names Kenna and Kinley. They follow the formula, because they both start with a K, and Kinley ends in ey......but they're not overused because Kenna ranked 924, and Kinley ranked #904. So........I like trendy sounding names, but not ones that are overly used. I hope that makes sense! LOL
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  #7  
December 24th, 2007, 10:52 AM
Miracle's Avatar ♥ Melissa ♥
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I'd probably say awkward creative spellings. I much prefer some creative spellings such as Makayla to Michaela, but I just don't like when a lot of extra letters are added just to make it different.
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  #8  
December 24th, 2007, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
My pet peeves are:

Misspelled names. I think it would be annoying to have to keep telling people how to spell my name because it's spelled "creatively." The misspellings don't look creative anyway, they look silly. I especially hate when the misspelling becomes more popular than the correct one (such as Kaitlyn/Katelyn being more common than Caitlin).

Boy names on girls. For one thing, it means that people will constantly mistake her for a boy, calling her "sir" on the phone and putting "Mr." on her mail. It also mean she'll have to act really girly, all the time, to avoid being thought of as masculine. If she isn't really pretty and feminine, it will just be a pain. Besides, no one would use a girl name for a boy, so why use a boy name for a girl?

The idea that misspelling a male name, especially by replacing the vowels with Ys makes it feminine. Spelling Cameron as Camryn does not make it feminine, it makes it misspelled.

Using countries, tribes, etc. as names (India, China, Dakota, Ireland, Cheyenne, etc.). It comes off as trying to sound exotic, and some people find it offensive.

Nicknames used as full names, and other childish/cutesy names like Charlie, Rylee, Marley, etc. They sound like dog names, and they will not sound good at all when the child is an adult and wants to be taken seriously.[/b]

Big fat DITTO to everything you just said! (Though I must admit that India is a guilty pleasure of mine, lol... but I'd never use it, especially since I named a puppy that once)

I also don't like "cutesy" names that, in my opinion, don't age well. A lot of the K-names are very cutesy to me.

I hate names like Madison, Addison, Mackenzie, and McKenna, ESPECIALLY when used on a girl... those names mean "SON OF...". Madison is "Maud's son", Addison = "Adam's son", Mackenzie & McKenna = "son of Kenneth". I personally feel that they are not feminine in the least bit... and putting a "Y" in there doesn't change that (i.e. Madisyn or Addisyn, etc).

It bothers me that people put "Mc" or "Mac" in front of a name to "make it Irish".

I don't like trendy names. Popular and trendy are two different things in my opinion. Daniel is a popular name, but it's a classic and probably will never go out of style. Trendy names are the ones that shoot in popularity seemingly out of nowhere (or maybe because a celebrity used it or it's a character on a popular TV show, or what-have-you). Caden, Hayden, Jayden, Brayden, etc (the whole -ayden trend); MacKayla (add that to the "adding Mac infront of something to make it Irish", Michaela is fine, but MacKayla or Makayla, no); etc.

...there are other pet peeves with naming of mine... but that should suffice for now. I've probably already offended a few people since many of the names I listed are really popular...
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  #9  
December 24th, 2007, 12:14 PM
Acadia's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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I'll take one that hasn't been mentioned, just to be different.

Surnames as first names. Okay, maybe you want to honor a family connection, or recognize the mom's maiden name or something. But then what's wrong with putting it in the middle and giving the kid a name of their OWN in the front?

It bothers me more when it's a surname with no family connection at all. It kind of seems like stealing it from people with a real connection to it. When every kid is named *insert surname*, naming their kid the same thing won't really be honoring their family or the mom's maiden name anymore.
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  #10  
December 24th, 2007, 01:45 PM
Niamh ૐ's Avatar Green Mama Goddess
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Quote:
I'll take one that hasn't been mentioned, just to be different.

Surnames as first names. Okay, maybe you want to honor a family connection, or recognize the mom's maiden name or something. But then what's wrong with putting it in the middle and giving the kid a name of their OWN in the front?

It bothers me more when it's a surname with no family connection at all. It kind of seems like stealing it from people with a real connection to it. When every kid is named *insert surname*, naming their kid the same thing won't really be honoring their family or the mom's maiden name anymore.[/b]

I was going to mention surnames as first names, but I only feel that way with SOME surnames. Others I don't have so much a problem with. My maiden name is Scott, and that's also a pretty commonly used first name as well and I never minded it being used as a first name. (Seamus' second middle name is Scott, but of course, that's to honor my maiden name) But yes, I do agree for the most part (but with exceptions) that surnames as first names bother me too. Especially when there's no familial connection.

ETA: Oh yes, and another pet peeve... words spelled backwards to make a name... most noteably: Nevaeh. To me, spelling a word backwards is akin to using the opposite of that word, so (to me) naming your daughter Nevaeh is like naming her Hell. :-/ The "name" (and I use that word loosly) Nevaeh could probably be it's own category of "name pet peeves" for me.
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  #11  
December 24th, 2007, 03:22 PM
Jlynn's Avatar Jamielynn
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I hate when sibling sets don't flow.

Ex. I have a client with 4 girls she named them

Jane
Mary
Machiko
Sue

The girls are all very close in age and the name Machiko is just so very different from the others.
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  #12  
December 24th, 2007, 05:43 PM
LvMyLaxKid's Avatar Super Mommy
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Surnames as first names. Okay, maybe you want to honor a family connection, or recognize the mom's maiden name or something. But then what's wrong with putting it in the middle and giving the kid a name of their OWN in the front?

Well, we did that. Parker was my MIL's maiden name, and she passed away from Cancer a few years before he was born. We both really liked the sound of Parker, PLUS the sentiment. I still consider it his own name, because nobody in our family has it as a first name. His MN is Joseph, after my grandfather. My DH and I had a hard time agreeing on names. When he mentioned Parker, after his mom, I thought it was a great idea, and loved the name. I never really thought about it not being his own.


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  #13  
December 25th, 2007, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
My pet peeves are:

Misspelled names. I think it would be annoying to have to keep telling people how to spell my name because it's spelled "creatively." The misspellings don't look creative anyway, they look silly. I especially hate when the misspelling becomes more popular than the correct one (such as Kaitlyn/Katelyn being more common than Caitlin).

Boy names on girls. For one thing, it means that people will constantly mistake her for a boy, calling her "sir" on the phone and putting "Mr." on her mail. It also mean she'll have to act really girly, all the time, to avoid being thought of as masculine. If she isn't really pretty and feminine, it will just be a pain. Besides, no one would use a girl name for a boy, so why use a boy name for a girl?

The idea that misspelling a male name, especially by replacing the vowels with Ys makes it feminine. Spelling Cameron as Camryn does not make it feminine, it makes it misspelled.

Using countries, tribes, etc. as names (India, China, Dakota, Ireland, Cheyenne, etc.). It comes off as trying to sound exotic, and some people find it offensive.

Nicknames used as full names, and other childish/cutesy names like Charlie, Rylee, Marley, etc. They sound like dog names, and they will not sound good at all when the child is an adult and wants to be taken seriously.[/b]
*breaks into song* Did you ever know that you're my heeeeroooooo...

Seriously, dude. Those are all my naming pet-peeves you listed there. A kindred spirit!
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  #14  
December 26th, 2007, 09:00 AM
**Jenn**'s Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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I agree with just about everyone here. I'd have to say my biggest pet peeve is the misspellings though. It just really gets under my skin. To me, it doesn't look "creative" it looks "illiterate."

I guess I can't comment on the boys names as girls names thing because we'll be doing the opposite for our next son--we intend to name our next future son Shannon. Even though I know its not a girl's name it is heard more often on girls so I guess that would fall into that pet peeve.
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  #15  
December 26th, 2007, 10:12 AM
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The Aiden/Ayden Trend.. Caden, Hayden, Zaden, Jayden, Mayden, Aiden

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  #16  
December 26th, 2007, 10:37 AM
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My biggest pet peeve are names that can be pronouced more than one way. I just feel sorry for the kid!
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  #17  
December 26th, 2007, 03:18 PM
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the "creative" spellings, makes people ask multiple times how to pronounce the child's name
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  #18  
December 26th, 2007, 04:50 PM
Melanie.'s Avatar Totalimmortal
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I actually like the vowel sounds in names like Dahlia Aleksandra (Doll-ya Alec-sand-ruh). It's what we chose before switching to Audrey Jane.

Quote:
My pet peeves are:

Misspelled names. I think it would be annoying to have to keep telling people how to spell my name because it's spelled "creatively." The misspellings don't look creative anyway, they look silly. I especially hate when the misspelling becomes more popular than the correct one (such as Kaitlyn/Katelyn being more common than Caitlin).

Boy names on girls. For one thing, it means that people will constantly mistake her for a boy, calling her "sir" on the phone and putting "Mr." on her mail. It also mean she'll have to act really girly, all the time, to avoid being thought of as masculine. If she isn't really pretty and feminine, it will just be a pain. Besides, no one would use a girl name for a boy, so why use a boy name for a girl?

The idea that misspelling a male name, especially by replacing the vowels with Ys makes it feminine. Spelling Cameron as Camryn does not make it feminine, it makes it misspelled.

Using countries, tribes, etc. as names (India, China, Dakota, Ireland, Cheyenne, etc.). It comes off as trying to sound exotic, and some people find it offensive.

Nicknames used as full names, and other childish/cutesy names like Charlie, Rylee, Marley, etc. They sound like dog names, and they will not sound good at all when the child is an adult and wants to be taken seriously.[/b]
All of these and:

Sibsets like:
Kayla, Kristin, Kyle, and Doug. Use the letter for them all or use different ones for each child.
Hunter, Spencer, and Asher. No, it's not cute that they end in the same letters.

Madison, Addison, Emerson, Jaden/Jadon/Jaiden/Jayden, Ayden/Aidan/Aiden/Aden, Cayden/Caden/Caiden, Haiden/Hayden/Haydin, Braydon/Brayden/Braiden/Braden, Evan, Leslie, Courtney, Ashley, etc. on girls. Most of those are bad enough on boys, but please not on a girl.



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  #19  
December 27th, 2007, 10:09 AM
Kalia20's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Quote:
I agree with just about everyone here. I'd have to say my biggest pet peeve is the misspellings though. It just really gets under my skin. To me, it doesn't look "creative" it looks "illiterate."

I guess I can't comment on the boys names as girls names thing because we'll be doing the opposite for our next son--we intend to name our next future son Shannon. Even though I know its not a girl's name it is heard more often on girls so I guess that would fall into that pet peeve. [/b]

I knew a guy named Shannon, I've always thought of it as a unisex name, but more common for girls. I see nothing wrong with it for a boy.

I totally agree about the misspellings.....I's to Y's, C's to K's just to make a name "original" isnt original, its annoying and the poor kid will have to spend their whole lives spelling it out. Must be a pain for teachers having two or more in a class and they spell it differently. Would make marking easier, but spoken a pain in the arse.
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  #20  
December 27th, 2007, 08:43 PM
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My biggest one is sib sets that rhyme. To me that is not cute.
My friend named her sons Claighton and Quinton. That really
annoys me lol.

I know a lot of you hate "overused" names but one of the greatest things
about an "overused" name is at least ppl know how to spell it. No one (yet)
has asked me how to spell my daughter's name (Emma). I do get asked all
of the time how to spell my son's name (Isaac). Which i think is odd since
It's from the Bible. Ppl wanna spell It Isaak,Izak,Issac, etc...that really bugs
me. I know that not everyone has read the Bible but come on lol.
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