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  #1  
September 6th, 2008, 08:18 PM
C&K'sMama's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,150
Hi my name is Ally and I have a beautiful little girl named Carrie. Recently we're ben told that there is a strong possibility that Carrie has vision problems (to the exten that one specialist thinks she's almost blind). She's got a lazy eye that they aren't sure her brain has shut off yet. (which is good for treatment, but bad for her current vision). Anyways.... Carrie is developmentally behind (significantly). I know there are other reasons, but I was wondering how far behind the vision should put her...

Anyone here willing to share.

Was your child late in reaching milestones? If so how late?

Did they bring things very close to their face to play.

Anyone who has delt with a lazy eye. Do they switch eyes that the focus with? (Carrie's right eye is turned in but sometimes she uses that one to look at us, usually it's her left eye. I was wondering if it was common for them to switch which eye they look though.

Thank you
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  #2  
September 7th, 2008, 12:48 PM
JennO's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,168
Quote:
Hi my name is Ally and I have a beautiful little girl named Carrie. Recently we're ben told that there is a strong possibility that Carrie has vision problems (to the exten that one specialist thinks she's almost blind). She's got a lazy eye that they aren't sure her brain has shut off yet. (which is good for treatment, but bad for her current vision). Anyways.... Carrie is developmentally behind (significantly). I know there are other reasons, but I was wondering how far behind the vision should put her...

Anyone here willing to share.

Was your child late in reaching milestones? If so how late?

Did they bring things very close to their face to play.

Anyone who has delt with a lazy eye. Do they switch eyes that the focus with? (Carrie's right eye is turned in but sometimes she uses that one to look at us, usually it's her left eye. I was wondering if it was common for them to switch which eye they look though.

Thank you[/b]
Hi Ally! Carrie sounds a little like my son. I knew something was wrong with his vision at 2 months. At 5 months we were sent to a ped. opth. He was diagnosed with a lazy eye and crossed eyes (amblyopia and esotropia) but the dr did not notice any significant vision loss. At this point, his brain had not "shut off" the lazy eye yet and was actually still trying to chose a dominant eye so his eyes "switched" a lot. Developmentally, things were pretty normal. He sat up at 5 months but rolling over was obviously delayed. He was patched for up to 6 hrs a day and had surgery (eye muscles) at 9 months. About 2 weeks after surgery, DS had a LOT of milestones at once! He rolled over front to back, then back to front, pulled up, crawled and even took a step within 3 days! It was amazing. Since surgery, he has made a lot of change... He is more tolerant of strangers instead of crying instantly when others engage him. He smiles and laughs all the time compared to never before. I don't know if Carrie will need surgery, and it is a VERY scary thing for parents, but it did make quite a difference for DS. I found Prevent Blindness in America's message boards very helpful. http://198.170.234.66/discus/message...tml?1220811640 Good luck!
Jenn
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  #3  
September 7th, 2008, 06:01 PM
C&K'sMama's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,150
WOW thank you so much. That link is great! And a lot of those little ones are having similar developmental issues Carries having (carrie's are a little more extreme since it's gone unnoticed so long) but it's making me feel so much better about SO MANY OTHER THINGS!! Thanks again.
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  #4  
September 8th, 2008, 10:28 AM
fiefer87's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Near Buffalo, NY
Posts: 4,336
Welcome Carrie. I am Jennifer, mommy to Alexis who is visually impaired and has been since birth. She is now 6 yo and doing very well, though she is still developmentally delayed. However, she also has autism and some brain structure abnormalities, which complicate her development beyond what just a VI will.

She sat up on time, but rolled at 10 months, crawled at 15, walked at 2 years, stood up at 2 1/2 and never spoke until 3. Please do not get scared reading this. As I said, my dd has mutliple contributing factors beyond just the visual impairment. She is about 20/200 (just legally blind) and we were told when she was diagnosed that the best we could hope for was light perception and maybe seeing very large objects. I think sometimes they tell you that because at a young age its so hard to know for sure, and then you are prepared for the worst and rejoice in all vision she does have.

So my biggest recommendations: go through early intervention so you can start receiving services for Carrie (if you haven't already) Make sure you get vision evaluations (vision teachers are a godsend and vision can develop until they are 2, so anything to help that is vital), a physical therapy eval, an occupational eval, a speech eval, and possibly a special ed eval, depending on Carries age. If you don't have these services or contacted EI yet, I would do it ASAP. The earlier you start treating the global developmental delays, the better Carrie will be in the long run. Please feel free to post a new topic or pm me if you have any questions.
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