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  #1  
May 9th, 2010, 04:50 AM
Mom2DyJessAva's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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Molly is getting spayed on the 25th...im pretty nervous!...I have to drop her off at 8am and wont be able to pick her up untill 3pm. I know they are going to go over everything when we pick her up but im curious what should i expect?..will I have to keep her in the cat carrier? Is she allowed to jump onto my bed and then down to her litter?..she has a favorite bed should i just put it on the floor next to her litter?..
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  #2  
May 9th, 2010, 01:37 PM
Arya's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I've only had male cats that needed to be neutered and for them all I really did was watch that they don't lick the incision. If they do start licking it excessively, we'd get a cone from the vet so they can't reach down there. For young kitties, they recover pretty fast. Hopefully someone else will have some other advice for you. Good luck
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  #3  
May 9th, 2010, 01:46 PM
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Don't be nervous, it's a quick procedure and easy follow up. Most places use dissolvable stitching nowadays so you shouldn't even have to go back. No she shouldn't be jumping for 3-4 days, but with a cat it's hard to stop to a certain point. That first day she'll be out of it more than likely for the rest of the day, the following day she should be pretty well back to her old self. YOu do not need to crate her no. If she likes that bed put it on the floor, no need to move her litter box, she knows where it is. Just keep an eye on her to make sure she isn't licking in the incision otherwise she'll need an e-collar, and check the incision once a day for signs of infection, but past that you really don't have to do anything she'll take care of herself.

Oh and if I remember right she was going to get her rabies vaccination at some point. Make sure there's AT LEAST 6 weeks (preferably 8-10) in between spaying (well any surgery) and any vaccinations. Vaccinations and surgery both deplete their immune systems and putting the two together is just a double whammy that their immune systems definitely don't need.

Also if you plan in microchipping her (I'd HIGHLY HIGHLY recommend it), you can get it done while she's under if you choose to. You can also get it done later (humane societies and mobile clinics usually charge around $30 for it so if it's $50+ at your vet I'd wait), but it's a large syringe so it can be easier when they're under.

Good luck!

Last edited by SpazTaz; May 9th, 2010 at 01:50 PM.
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  #4  
May 9th, 2010, 05:37 PM
Mom2DyJessAva's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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thanks for the info..im planning on getting the microchip..my grandma went to the same place im bringing my cat and it was only 15 dollars..

there is a small problem..she gets her rabies and distemper on the 20th and spayed on the 25th
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  #5  
May 9th, 2010, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dylan&jessica's mom View Post
thanks for the info..im planning on getting the microchip..my grandma went to the same place im bringing my cat and it was only 15 dollars..

there is a small problem..she gets her rabies and distemper on the 20th and spayed on the 25th
Then wait to get both until 6 weeks after the surgery. No harm there. Cancel the vaccination appointment, do the surgery and make VERY VERY VERY clear you DO NOT want the vaccinations given that day you will bring her back for those mark it on all paperwork (many clinics will do it anyway and claim they didn't know) so that it is well documented. And then make an appointment to get those done 6-8 weeks after. I absolutely would not chance doing it that close together and risk life long allergies, immune complications and other issues.
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  #6  
May 10th, 2010, 01:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dylan&jessica's mom View Post
thanks for the info..im planning on getting the microchip..my grandma went to the same place im bringing my cat and it was only 15 dollars..

there is a small problem..she gets her rabies and distemper on the 20th and spayed on the 25th
$15 is a GREAT rate! Before you leave though make sure that that includes the registration fee. Most do, but there's some that don't and then you have to pay the chip company directly to register them. And I know it sounds stupid but SO many folks don't, make sure you keep the info up to date. Personally I call the companies (since we have 5 animals we have more than 1 chip company) every 6 months just to go over the info they have and make sure it's all still current.

Let us know how the spay goes!
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  #7  
May 10th, 2010, 04:50 AM
Mom2DyJessAva's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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one problem...she needs her vaccine before they do the spaying...ill figure something out
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  #8  
May 10th, 2010, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by dylan&jessica's mom View Post
one problem...she needs her vaccine before they do the spaying...ill figure something out
Then I'd go elsewhere. ASPCA or a mobile unit won't ask or care they just want to spay/neuter them. Or do the vaccination and hold off on the spay/neuter for 6 weeks.
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  #9  
May 11th, 2010, 01:45 AM
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If she is a healthy girl, there is no reason why she can't have her vaccines and the surgery. The greatest immune response to the vaccine happens over the first couple days. She will be fine with the surgery 5 days later. The microchipping is usually done under anesthesia.

You will be told to remove her feed at 6pm (or there about) the night before surgery. Some vets also want water removed. At my practice, we allow water up to the surgery.

When she goes home she will still be groggy and may sleep the rest of the day, which is not too concerning. You can go ahead and give her a half meal that evening, but don't be too surprised if she doesn't eat it or finish it. You can continue regular feeding the day after. She will be given pain medication as part of the pre-med anesthesia protocol. Some practices, including mine, will send you home with an oral pain med such as Metacam for 3 days after surgery. Try to keep her from licking at her incision. If she really starts to go at it, then she will need to wear an Elizabethan collar for a couple days. Some practices use intradermal sutures which will not need to be removed. But they will probably still want to see her in a week or so to check the incision and make sure all is healing well. Other practices prefer a simple continuous or simple interrupted suture pattern. These sutures will need to be removed at 7-10 days post-op, at the same time as the re-check appt.

It is a very routine procedure, so it is easy to forget that it is a major abdominal surgery. She may be quiet and tender for a couple days. If you can stop her from jumping, that would be best... but its very hard to prevent cats from doing that.
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  #10  
May 11th, 2010, 01:57 AM
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I have to respectfully disagree on the vaccinations and surgery and it typically takes 4 weeks for the vaccinations to become 100% effective and 8-10 for the immune system to start to rebuild itself. (and personally I've never done microchipping under anesthesia and all 7 of my animals I've had done did just fine (3 of which were cats, one of which was a 9 week old puppy).

So some research on it, it is typically advised against. I am all for vaccinations and all for spaying, I personally would NEVER do them together nor would I ever recommend it...healthy or not, the effects on the immune system remain the same, it compromises it for a decent amount of time.

Dr. Jeffrey Levy DVM PCH :: Classical Veterinary Homeopathy : Vaccinations

The Rabies Vaccine for Dogs and Cats: What You Need to Know Now
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  #11  
May 11th, 2010, 02:48 AM
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That's perfectly fine. You can do whatever you wish with your own pets. I AM a vet. Yes, licensed in the US and the UK. Yes, normally vaccines are done as a kitten, so they are well out of the way before a castration procedure. But in this case, they were not completed as a kitten. Yes, it does take several weeks for a vaccine to be be 'completely effective', but there really is no threat of this cat contracting rabies or distemper while undergoing surgery. And yes, microchipping can be done at any time in the awake patient, but if it has not been done already by the time of spay, it is nice to save that animal the discomfort and do it at the same time as the surgery (maybe I was misunderstood, I was not talking a separate anesthesia for the microchipping).

So like I said you are more than welcome to disagree. I do have a lot more education than you. I do agree that the ideal situation is to have the vaccine course finished by 16 weeks, but if it is not it is perfectly okay to be done later even if it is around the time of surgery. I do not recommend vaccination on the actual day of surgery because of the small but possible risk of anaphalaxis.

I always HIGHLY encourage people to listen to their own vets advice and come up with a treatment/health plan together, and not someone's advice over the internet (myself included), over the professional they have chosen and hired to help ensure their animal's health.
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  #12  
May 11th, 2010, 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by **jessie** View Post
That's perfectly fine. You can do whatever you wish with your own pets. I AM a vet. Yes, licensed in the US and the UK. Yes, normally vaccines are done as a kitten, so they are well out of the way before a castration procedure. But in this case, they were not completed as a kitten. Yes, it does take several weeks for a vaccine to be be 'completely effective', but there really is no threat of this cat contracting rabies or distemper while undergoing surgery. And yes, microchipping can be done at any time in the awake patient, but if it has not been done already by the time of spay, it is nice to save that animal the discomfort and do it at the same time as the surgery (maybe I was misunderstood, I was not talking a separate anesthesia for the microchipping).

So like I said you are more than welcome to disagree. I do have a lot more education than you. I do agree that the ideal situation is to have the vaccine course finished by 16 weeks, but if it is not it is perfectly okay to be done later even if it is around the time of surgery. I do not recommend vaccination on the actual day of surgery because of the small but possible risk of anaphalaxis.

I always HIGHLY encourage people to listen to their own vets advice and come up with a treatment/health plan together, and not someone's advice over the internet (myself included), over the professional they have chosen and hired to help ensure their animal's health.
Unless you know me, you shouldn't assume anything. You have ZERO idea how much schooling I do or don't have, what I do, or anything else about me really other than what I have said on here. And quite honestly there's no proof you have any schooling either.

I am not pro vet (no offense), most do things they shouldn't (like vaccinating yearly, vaccinating at surgery, giving vaccinations to unhealthy dogs such as ones with allergies and diseases, etc), so I think sometimes the almighty dollar gets in the way. I never said the animal would contract Rabies or distemper, the point was, it takes a LONG TIME for the damage of the vaccination (yes it depleates the immune system) to wear off, so the animal then going under and doing surgery has a higher risk of contracting URI's, developing allergies, etc and other common ailments due to a lowered immune system from vaccinations and then also from having surgery (which also lowers the immune system). Why do them both together when you don't have to? Do the vaccinations and 2-3 months later do the spay, no big deal and the pet can be spared possible complications, double lowered immune system and possible life long issues from it.

Unfortunately many vets are schooled in Western Medicine...which isn't always the safest or best choice of action. Same way vets (many) still recommend yearly vaccinations yet the AAHA recommends every 3 years, why vets prescribe so called "prescription food" where all it is is an overpriced bag of corn and HORRIBLY unhealthy for the animals, why they will do vaccinations and surgery on the same day (and many times lower the cost of one or the other to push people into it)...at the end of the day, it's still a business and sorry, but unfortunately I believe that one SHOULD do research themselves and yes listen to their vet but at the end of the day it's YOUR pet and your choice what to do.

Just don't see the point of doing both so close together when it isn't necessary. Delay the spay, no big deal (as long as the cat is an indoor cat and is watched very closely)...there's actually health benefits to waiting until after their first heat cycle at that. I don't recommend this for everyone (many are too careless) but for someone responsible, it's usually the better course to go anyway.
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  #13  
May 11th, 2010, 03:16 AM
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Okay, I apologize. You are right, I have no idea how much schooling you have. And you are most correct in that you do not know how much I have. That is the only apology I will make. That is why I said it is important to not listen to people over the internet over one's doctor, veterinarian or other health care provider.

From the sounds of other posts, this lady is quite pleased with the care her cat has received from this practice. No matter how much education you have had or have not, you are not more qualified to make health care decision on this animal than its own veterinarian who has seen and examined this animal, and have spoken with her owner. THAT is my point. This practice has deemed it safe and even preferable for this animal to receive those vaccines and the surgery at those particular times. You cannot call it a money issue. If the vaccines were delayed (I would never delay the spay), the they would still receive the same amount in fees.

I just had to respond here because I get terribly worried that someone might make the mistake of listening to some stranger over the internet. I know you have extremely strong opinions on everything, but you might notice this board is essentially dead. Many people do not make it past one or two posts here. You choose to at first politely inform them on your opinions (which I see no problem with), but then you get extremely hostile to them for making decisions that are not the same as your own, be it nutrition, vet care, training, breeding, ect.

I wish you all the best. I will not be returning here. dylan&jessica's mom, if you have any further questions about what to expect, you can PM me at any time.
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  #14  
May 11th, 2010, 01:39 PM
my.estrella's Avatar Ashley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommie2One View Post
Just don't see the point of doing both so close together when it isn't necessary. Delay the spay, no big deal (as long as the cat is an indoor cat and is watched very closely)...there's actually health benefits to waiting until after their first heat cycle at that. I don't recommend this for everyone (many are too careless) but for someone responsible, it's usually the better course to go anyway.
I wasn't going to say anything here, but I have to ask you why you say that it's better for the cat to go through one heat? Can you give me some references?

In my experience, if you spay early (before the first heat, or before the second heat) it drastically reduces the risk of certain cancers.
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  #15  
May 11th, 2010, 06:05 PM
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Awww.... Jessie I wish you would stick around! It would be nice to have a vet on here.

I always think it's best to get a variety of opinions, but in the end you have to do what's best for YOU and YOUR pet and you need to trust your vet's judgment. If your vet does things you aren't comfortable with, then find a new one, but most of the time I believe vets have your pet in their best interest. I have found online clinic reviews to be helpful and after a couple of horrible vets, I now have one that I fully trust. Good luck!



ETA: I just wanted to add that everyone I have spoken with has ALWAYS recommended spaying before the first heat to prevent cancers and other diseases, but to also avoid any and all chances of unwanted pregnancies.
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Last edited by PastelCalico; May 11th, 2010 at 06:22 PM.
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  #16  
May 11th, 2010, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Barlea View Post
Awww.... Jessie I wish you would stick around! It would be nice to have a vet on here.

I always think it's best to get a variety of opinions, but in the end you have to do what's best for YOU and YOUR pet and you need to trust your vet's judgment. If your vet does things you aren't comfortable with, then find a new one, but most of the time I believe vets have your pet in their best interest. I have found online clinic reviews to be helpful and after a couple of horrible vets, I now have one that I fully trust. Good luck!



ETA: I just wanted to add that everyone I have spoken with has ALWAYS recommended spaying before the first heat to prevent cancers and other diseases, but to also avoid any and all chances of unwanted pregnancies.
If you do some research on that it is becoming less and less the norm (spaying before first heat). Only cancer it really helps prevent is mammary cancer. But the chances of bone cancers and other cancers actually INCREASE by quite a lot (same with neutering). Which is why I said I recommend it AFTER the animal matures (1 year approximately) as long as the owner is responsible, if they're not responsible, cannot keep the cat indoors all the time, etc then obviously get it done prior to prevent pregnancy, but it isn't an issue for responsible pet owners.

I personally neutered my dog at 6 months old, NEVER EVER again will I make that mistake, if we ever have another younger dog it'll definitely be 12-18 months before we spay or neuter...but I'm also responsible and I've done the research to support my decision as well.

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf
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  #17  
May 12th, 2010, 03:35 AM
Mom2DyJessAva's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
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THANKS EVERYONE...


i really cant wait to have her spayed untill shes a year..i go to my moms house and her cat drives me insane when shes in heat!!!..we go the 20th to the vet and ill inform her about the spaying and see what she says
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  #18  
May 12th, 2010, 08:50 PM
faith*hope*love's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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I lurk here every now and then, and honestly never stick around because of how hostile this board can get. I will say that I have posted on a different board with Jessie and I DO know that she is a vet, so no need to question her education. I will also say that I work in a clinic and am going through schooling to be a certified vet tech, and many of the things I read on here are NOT what is getting taught to the professionals that take care of your animals. And just to add in mammary cancer in cats is fairly common in the clinic I work at, so I feel that it IS important to spay young. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but after seeing so many people being treated as if they will never be educated, and their way is wrong, I felt that it was time to speak up.

Oh and perscription food saved my dogs life, without it her stomach issues would have gotten so bad that she would have been emaciated and eventually starved to death, so I have to disagree on that one too.
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  #19  
May 14th, 2010, 03:17 PM
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If you do some research on that it is becoming less and less the norm (spaying before first heat). Only cancer it really helps prevent is mammary cancer. But the chances of bone cancers and other cancers actually INCREASE by quite a lot (same with neutering). Which is why I said I recommend it AFTER the animal matures (1 year approximately) as long as the owner is responsible, if they're not responsible, cannot keep the cat indoors all the time, etc then obviously get it done prior to prevent pregnancy, but it isn't an issue for responsible pet owners.

I personally neutered my dog at 6 months old, NEVER EVER again will I make that mistake, if we ever have another younger dog it'll definitely be 12-18 months before we spay or neuter...but I'm also responsible and I've done the research to support my decision as well.

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf
Well, unfortunately there is no magical, perfect window of time to get your pet altered without the risk of them developing something later in life. For each heat cycle that a female cat or dog goes through, their chances of developing mammary cancer increases and if you wait for a female to become fully mature before spaying her, then her chances of developing mammary cancer are equal to that of a dog or cat that has never been spayed. According to your little article, the chances of bone cancer and other issues increasing are dog breed (this thread pertains to a cat) specific and about equal to the odds of a female dog spayed once fully mature developing mammary cancer. So because there may be a risk of some form of cancer either way (depending on the breed), and that spayed/neutered animals are more mentally stable, and the fact that with the majority of pet owners, the longer they wait to do something the less likely they are to actually do it, and the already out of control pet population, I can understand why the majority of vets would recommend and practice early alteration of pets. I also agree with early alteration and will always alter my pets well before 12 months of age.
You can come back with whatever comment you may like, but I will not be responding to it. Like I said, I agree with early alteration and the fact that most vets agree with it as well makes me comfortable with my opinion.

Quote:
I lurk here every now and then, and honestly never stick around because of how hostile this board can get. I will say that I have posted on a different board with Jessie and I DO know that she is a vet, so no need to question her education. I will also say that I work in a clinic and am going through schooling to be a certified vet tech, and many of the things I read on here are NOT what is getting taught to the professionals that take care of your animals. And just to add in mammary cancer in cats is fairly common in the clinic I work at, so I feel that it IS important to spay young. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but after seeing so many people being treated as if they will never be educated, and their way is wrong, I felt that it was time to speak up.

Oh and perscription food saved my dogs life, without it her stomach issues would have gotten so bad that she would have been emaciated and eventually starved to death, so I have to disagree on that one too.
I find it sad people are uncomfortable posting here. This is supposed to be a fun, happy place!
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  #20  
May 14th, 2010, 05:15 PM
my.estrella's Avatar Ashley
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Originally Posted by Barlea View Post
So because there may be a risk of some form of cancer either way (depending on the breed), and that spayed/neutered animals are more mentally stable, and the fact that with the majority of pet owners, the longer they wait to do something the less likely they are to actually do it, and the already out of control pet population, I can understand why the majority of vets would recommend and practice early alteration of pets. I also agree with early alteration and will always alter my pets well before 12 months of age.
I completely 100% agree with you. We had to put our 13 year old dog put down in October because she developed a very aggressive Mammary cancer. She was never spayed. I would rather spay a dog/cat and 100% prevent mammary cancer.

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I find it sad people are uncomfortable posting here. This is supposed to be a fun, happy place!
It is supposed to be a happy, welcoming, understanding place. Unfortunately it isn't, and the board is suffering.
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