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Hip dysplasia- Need advice


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  #1  
April 25th, 2011, 08:14 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: TN
Posts: 20
Our vet diagnosed our 14mth old puppy with hip dysplasia today... Weighing in at over 100lbs and still growing (Dane Mix), this isn't exactly the news we wanted to hear...

Our vet told us to start on Glucocimine (spelling?) daily, and to give aspirin as needed... and we'll go from there. He said that's also the reason he sways so bad when he walks, the reason his chest is so buff and the rest of his body slender (he's putting as much weight on the front legs instead of the back), and could even be one of the reasons he prefers to sleep sitting up or leaning against the arm of the couch.

Poor little guy (HA) just can't catch a break. He's already had tumors removed, has sensitivities to everything (including grass even), and likes to eat bumble bees...

We're doing everything we can for him... We're trying to explain to the teens why the dog park is out now, and there's to be no more games of chase or rough housing... But they don't fully understand... Heck, sadly enough, neither do we....

So can I have some advice from BTDT pet owners who have walked in the shoes I just stepped in today? Please and thanks... I could use it right now.
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  #2  
April 26th, 2011, 01:03 PM
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Well, here's the thing...at the end fo the day the dog is a dog. I'm not saying run him raggad, but at the same time, he's a young dog, and I'd much prefer to see a dog live 2-3 years extremely happy versus 10 years miserable by being cooped up...JMO. IMO no reason he can't go to the dog park as long as he is making the decision to run or not to run. I wouldn't do forced exercise (ie running alongside a bike type of stuff), but short walks, and voluntary play should be fine.

On the Aspirin DON'T DO IT, VERY old school thinking. It can cause gastro issues and bleeding in the gut and just isn't worth the risk when there are much safer drugs (such as Tramadol or Previcox) on the market today.

Glucosamine/Chondroitin/MSM combo pill would be a good idea as would high doses of fish oil which is a natural anti-inflammatory.

I would encourage you to get your pup into a veterinary orthopedist as well, especially given the age. Your vet's "advice" is extremely sub par and very old school, so I'd encouarge you to find a specialist in your area. They're a little more expensive but well worth it when dealing with things like this.

Also make sure your pup is on a good food, should have LONG been off of puppy food (if ever given it in the first place), has good supplements, and some exercise (not forced though).

You mentioned swaying, given the breed, and sounds like poor breeding unfortunately, you may want to mention Wobbler's Disease to the vet as well to have that ruled out as a potential possibility.

Good luck to you and very sorry to hear about your pup's issues. Very sad to see one so young affected by so many things. Just rememer, that the best life is the one that you can be proud to give him and let him enjoy being a dog.
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  #3  
April 26th, 2011, 09:24 PM
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I agree... at the end of the day, he's still a dog... However, the bad thing is, he doesn't know when enough play is enough. He will continue playing even limping . I won't say he's not bright, but at the same time, let's face it... he thinks bumble bees are his best friends and meant to be chewed on... This week alone we've removed three stingers from his jowls.

Glucosamine/Chondroitin/MSM combo pill is what we ordered just today as a matter of fact! I'm also really cautious about the aspirin. We actually are going to be asking more about alternative pain management for him.

We are already looking into a specialist and also into hydrotherapy as well. The problem is everyone who does it in our area isn't equip to handle large breed dogs... We're in the process of contacting some of the horse facilities to see...

He is certainly on a good food, and has long been off puppy food. He was only on it til 6mths of age... We don't do forced exercise at all, and thankfully have a large, fenced in back yard he can ramble and play in.

Poor breeding wouldn't surprise me... He was found on the side of the road, and bleeding heart me... well, needless to say, he stayed with me vs going anywhere. My two teens (that we're adopting from the foster care system) will quickly tell you that "Mom is a sucker for anything kids and animals"... But at the same time, if that's the worst they can say about me, keep on saying it!
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  #4  
April 26th, 2011, 09:33 PM
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What food do you feed? Unfortunately 6 months is too long in giant breeds (most giant owners don't feed puppy food at all), but what's done is done since he's past that point. Given that he is still growing skeletally I'd HIGHLY recommend a large breed food if he isn't already on one.

Well, I guess my point was, I wouldn't say no more rough housing and no more dog park. Maybe hit the dog park for 40 minutes once a day and keep rough housing to 20 minute intervals (or if you notice him getting sore at 20 minutes keep it to 15 you know). But I definitely wouldn't cut them out all together...JMO.

I did human supplements as opposed to dog supplements (cheaper and IMO better quality), but you don't have to either is fine. Fish oil is a natural anti-inflammatory and 1,000mg of fish oil per 20 pounds of body weight is usually a good dose for medical purposes. I get mine at Costco, the human stuff for 400 soft gels for like $9 and it works out well. Tramadol is a pain medication that is a human pain reliever (prescription only) so it's cheap if you get the RX and head to a human pharmacy (and if you can buy in bulk it's even cheaper), Previcox is a good NSAID (dog only), but I will warn it's a little on the pricey side. I'd advise staying away from Rimadyl and Aspirin.

So glad you took him in for sure! A specialist may advise for sugery as well given how young he is, but as with most doggy surgeries it's mighty pricey .

Good luck! Hope you're able to get him into the hydrotherapy and a specialist! As you can see from my siggy...BTDT with more than one issue and more than one dog/cat so I definitely sympathize for sure.
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  #5  
April 27th, 2011, 07:55 AM
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Always glad to answer questions about him We feed him Avoderm because it's the only thing we've found not to mess with his tummy (did I mention food sensitivities out the rear). We do use the large breed formula. Also, at the advice of the vet, we occasionally throw in some wet food as well.

We do use the human version of supplements when they are available... We use Kirkland for the glucosamine and have no problems for the fish oil either... I'm currently on the phone with my vet asking about a prescription for Tramadol for him.

We know all about surgeries as we've already spent literally over ten grand if you want to include the emergency surgeries he had to have due to previous injuries before we got him. We're not against spending the money if it can help him.
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  #6  
April 27th, 2011, 08:01 AM
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It would probably behoove you to put him on a grain free food as both arthritis, HD, and many other degenerative conditions are worsened by a few different grains. Additional protein would also help to build up lean muscle which would help him as well. My dog has extreme food allergies to multiple things as well as colitis, I've found that Earthborn's Primitive work well for him as does Taste of the Wild's Pacific Stream both are grain free foods. Just a suggestion. I'd skip the canned food and instead add in fresh real meat. It's the protein you want (which is the point of the canned), but real fresh meat is typically a better way to go.

And don't fill the Tramadol with the vet, it's expensive. When I bought a 6 month supply at a time through Costco (you do not have to be a member to go, however get a further discount if you are) it ended up being around $3 a month and our girl took quite a bit of it. So it's cheap through the human pharmacy.

Surgery can be an option for HD depending upon the severity and what's causing it. Unfortunately it isn't always an option, but sometimes it is so if it's something you're willing/able to do then it's probably worth a consult with an ortho sooner rther than later.

Good luck!
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  #7  
May 20th, 2011, 09:15 AM
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I have a great dane. Let me tell you if he is even part dane please don't feed him anything over 23% protien its really bad for danes. They are not meant to have Large Breed foods. You may wish to talk to some people at Danes Online DOL Great Dane Forum - Comprehensive Great Dane Discussion Forum.
We learned so much from them about Great Danes before we adopted ours. They can give you all the right supplements and food recommendations and things like that to help your boy. Not to steal from JM but there are breeders, vets, owners etc there that are wonderfully helfpul. Danes are known for hip problems and with what you are describing I to would wonder about wobblers. We also have orthopedic beds for Dottie and she is on the couch alot . She doesn't have hip problems but it could happen. Our dane is only 18 months. Please feel free to PM me if you have any questions I can help with. You might even be able to find a vet through DOL that knows more about danes.
I also agree that grain free food is much better for them or raw if you have the time and energy. Good luck I hope you can find some relief for your boy.
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  #8  
May 21st, 2011, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommie2One View Post
It would probably behoove you to put him on a grain free food as both arthritis, HD, and many other degenerative conditions are worsened by a few different grains. Additional protein would also help to build up lean muscle which would help him as well. My dog has extreme food allergies to multiple things as well as colitis, I've found that Earthborn's Primitive work well for him as does Taste of the Wild's Pacific Stream both are grain free foods. Just a suggestion. I'd skip the canned food and instead add in fresh real meat. It's the protein you want (which is the point of the canned), but real fresh meat is typically a better way to go.

And don't fill the Tramadol with the vet, it's expensive. When I bought a 6 month supply at a time through Costco (you do not have to be a member to go, however get a further discount if you are) it ended up being around $3 a month and our girl took quite a bit of it. So it's cheap through the human pharmacy.

Surgery can be an option for HD depending upon the severity and what's causing it. Unfortunately it isn't always an option, but sometimes it is so if it's something you're willing/able to do then it's probably worth a consult with an ortho sooner rther than later.

Good luck!
Excellent post! Other good foods to check out are EVO and Orijen or Acana (Orijen and Acana are made by the same company - IMO Orijen is a better food but some dogs find it too rich, and Acana is a better option for those pups), they are both high quality grain-free foods. Bonus, both of them have formulas that are good for dogs with allergies - I've had dogs with chicken and beef allergies do very well on the fish formulas of both, and of course grains are some of the most common dog food allergies.

The #1 thing to look at in a large breed dog's food is not protein content, but calcium and phosphorus levels. Calcium needs to be present not only at a particular level but also at an appropriate amount with respect to phosphorus. The calcium to phosphorus ratio should be between 1.1 : 1.4 -1. If too much calcium is fed, especially to large breed dogs when they are young, bone growth can actually be decreased and problems such as OCD and hip dysplasia can result. HVN recommend calcium at .5-.9% for adult dogs and double that for puppies and pregnant/nursing dogs.

The only thing to worry about with feeding both dry food and fresh meat is to NOT mix them together or feed them at the same time. I find that dry food in the morning and meat at night or vice versa is easiest. Dogs digest processed food and whole meat at different rates so it's easier on their tummies this way.

You may also want to consider trying out an alternative medicine vet. My old girl Tess appeared to feel much better after receiving acupuncture, although I found it too expensive to do as regularly as I ought to have.

Finally, I wouldn't stress too much. With good care and minimal intervention it's quite possible that he will not worsen for quite some time. If he appears to be getting worse quite rapidly, surgery may be your best option. And if surgery is ineffective or not an option for you, financially, euthanasia may be your kindest choice. But all that said, my raw-fed German Shepherd mix, Tess, lived very comfortably with HD (no surgery) for many years and would likely have lived even longer if she hadn't developed a cancerous tumor at the age of 10. So it can be overcome!

***hugs*** Best of luck to you!
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