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How do you feel about homeschooling?


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  #1  
April 26th, 2009, 12:48 AM
Miracle's Avatar ♥ Melissa ♥
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 39,274
Will you homeschool or not? Why? Have you considered it?
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  #2  
April 26th, 2009, 01:20 AM
beck12's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Michigan
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I JUST answered this in a debate...so I am just going to copy & paste...

But remember when reading it that it was a debate response...lOL

Quote:
I am ALL for homeschooling. I am not sure what we will do, but I am researching my options. I currently work, but that could possibly change by then ,s o that may open other options as well...

For those who fear children don't learn enough at home:

Colleges That Admit Homeschoolers FAQ (Learn in Freedom!)
A lonnngggg list of Colleges that homeschoolers have attended

Schoolhouse rocked - The Boston Globe
Quote:
No longer just for the religious fundamentalists, home schooling has gone main stream, especially in Massachusetts. It's estimated that as many as 20,000 children here have abandoned test-crazy public schools and high-priced private schools for the comfort of the living room couch. But most surprising of all is that Harvard, BU, Brown, and other colleges are welcoming home-schoolers like all other students.
How do homeschooled students attend Ivy leagues? - College Discussion
A woman who homeschooled talking about her sons acceptances to different colleges:
Quote:
My son got into UCLA, Berkeley and UCSD. He got turned down by UCSC, which is one of the least selective UCs.

To get consideration at a UC, you have to fulfil the A-G requirements. This is pretty tricky, and basically impossible for HSers. There is another, rarely used approach - Admission by Exam. Here they look at your SAT scores (including 2 SAT IIs).

I think it is easier for HSers to get into the more selective schools, because they actually look at your application, instead of just applying formulas.

My son has a very impressive academic record - he has high SAT scores, 7 AP scores of 5 (plus was planning to take for more his senior year, but did not because the school he ended up at does not give credit). He also does extremely well in math competitions. By any one's standards he is a top student.

The UC experience was interesting. By the time we got results, he had been accepted EA to his two top choices - Caltech and MIT. UCLA did the best job - they sent him a letter saying he was in the top 1% of the applicant pool and asked him to apply for a regents scholarship. He didn't apply, but they accepted him with honors (whatever that means). UCSD has something they do for their top applicants, and my son was not included, but after he was accepted he got a letter from the math department saying he was one of their top applicants and they hoped he would accept. Berkeley accepted him without anything extra. UCSC was the oddest - like UCLA, he received the Top 1% letter, but then turned him down.

My son was also going to apply to Stanford, Princeton, U of Chicago, Harvey Mudd and WashU. When he got his EA decision, he dropped these plans. I have no reason to think he would not have been taken seriously.

To get into a top school, you need to be top student. Even kids who are going to top prep schools need a lot more than just a good report card. The same is true of HSers. I think HSers need better standardized test scores, but everyone needs other interests and areas of expertise. I think many HSers find this last part easier than school kids.
Home School Acceptances, Class of 2013! - College Discussion
A thread talking about college applications & acceptance for homeschoolers.

Homeschoolers Changing the World - Homeschooling Articles - Homeschool.com - Your Virtual Homeschool
Quote:
Marlyn McGrath Lewis, Director of Admissions for Harvard College says "We receive a good number of candidates every year with all or part of their education from a homeschool background. Homeschooling is broader than some people realize. We are looking for the strongest candidates in the world and we find some of those among homeschoolers."
As Homeschooled Population Tops 1 Million, More Seeking College Admission | Reuters

Quote:
Today, many colleges have a dedicated homeschool admissions officer, a
homeschool admissions policy, or both. Homeschoolers, like other students, can
qualify for federal financial aid in the form of grants and student
loans. And last year, the Common Application, a college application format
used by more than 300 schools, added a supplement for homeschooled students
to help streamline their application process, The Chronicle of Higher Education
reported.
This doesn't sound to me like homeschooled children are missing much. Harvard started admitting them in the 80's. Right now about 2% of the overall population is homeschooled. I think this will only increase. I do think there ARE teachers out there not doing their jobs. I don't see why anyone would take that personal. Even teachers MUST have had a teacher or two or three while going through their education that they know weren't good at their job, didn't care, etc. It HAPPENS - in all jobs. The problem is that depending on the child, a disconnected or even bad teacher can change the entire course of a child's education. I believe there are TONS of great teachers out there as well & I applaud them for what they do in the lives of children every day. "Bad teachers" actually don't even touch on why I would choose to homeschool though...it never even factored in. I would choose it to give my child the advantage of being able to work at his own pace & with a curriculum that suited HIS abilities. I was always ahead of other students & I think it does a disservice to a child to be bored in a class...or to hold them where their "age" is. This would also hold true if he happened to work slower, he should not have to deal with the social pressure or others making him feel as if he is stupid for not being at a certain level yet. ALL kids should be able to be educated without that pressure. Children blossom then there is no pressure & instead expectations are placed on effort rather than achievement .... I believe every child would do better in that environment - not worrying about how they measure up to others, but how they measure up to themselves & what progress THEY are making. In regular life we are always competing...but by & large if competition is what fuels you & gets you to do better, then someone failed at teaching you self discipline & motivation a LONG time ago. If you can do amazing when in competition & just so-so when not, then you need to examine what motivates you & why. You are always capable of doing your best when you want to do your best, it is just a matter of choosing to push yourself from an internal place rather than an external motivator. If you are motivated externally - you are giving your power & any control you may have in your life away. I truly believe my child would learn all of that better in the home. Now would I homeschool through high school? I don't know. I don't even know that I will do it at all - but I certainly am proud of those that take that on & I understand why they do.

I also know there are ways to network for socialization, field trips, subjects you don't feel strong on or simply can't teach (like maybe a foreign language or a higher math)... Lots of parents trade students & take advantage of each others strengths & support each other through the weaknesses.

(To the PP that was a teacherThe idea that a teacher would feel that someone homeschooled because of something that they felt was the mainstream "teacher's fault" is sad. No one should feel that way. Instead choose to see it through MY eyes. It is as though I have the opportunity to have someone like YOU one & one with my child....and just think of what YOU could teach a child if you truly could teach to that child, for their best advancement, without having to deal with discipline issues of other students, a "time" when you must move on to the next subject, etc. I bet even you have to admit - you could do some of those students an IMMENSE amount of good academically IF you had the freedom to do so & on a one-on-one basis.

Sorry for the book...
__________________
Read more: http://www.justmommies.com/forums/f4...xzz0DlWR8sL5&B (Homeschooling)

I JUST answered this in a debate...so I am just going to copy & paste...

But remember when reading it that it was a debate response...lOL

Quote:
I am ALL for homeschooling. I am not sure what we will do, but I am researching my options. I currently work, but that could possibly change by then ,s o that may open other options as well...

For those who fear children don't learn enough at home:

Colleges That Admit Homeschoolers FAQ (Learn in Freedom!)
A lonnngggg list of Colleges that homeschoolers have attended

Schoolhouse rocked - The Boston Globe
Quote:
No longer just for the religious fundamentalists, home schooling has gone main stream, especially in Massachusetts. It's estimated that as many as 20,000 children here have abandoned test-crazy public schools and high-priced private schools for the comfort of the living room couch. But most surprising of all is that Harvard, BU, Brown, and other colleges are welcoming home-schoolers like all other students.
How do homeschooled students attend Ivy leagues? - College Discussion
A woman who homeschooled talking about her sons acceptances to different colleges:
Quote:
My son got into UCLA, Berkeley and UCSD. He got turned down by UCSC, which is one of the least selective UCs.

To get consideration at a UC, you have to fulfil the A-G requirements. This is pretty tricky, and basically impossible for HSers. There is another, rarely used approach - Admission by Exam. Here they look at your SAT scores (including 2 SAT IIs).

I think it is easier for HSers to get into the more selective schools, because they actually look at your application, instead of just applying formulas.

My son has a very impressive academic record - he has high SAT scores, 7 AP scores of 5 (plus was planning to take for more his senior year, but did not because the school he ended up at does not give credit). He also does extremely well in math competitions. By any one's standards he is a top student.

The UC experience was interesting. By the time we got results, he had been accepted EA to his two top choices - Caltech and MIT. UCLA did the best job - they sent him a letter saying he was in the top 1% of the applicant pool and asked him to apply for a regents scholarship. He didn't apply, but they accepted him with honors (whatever that means). UCSD has something they do for their top applicants, and my son was not included, but after he was accepted he got a letter from the math department saying he was one of their top applicants and they hoped he would accept. Berkeley accepted him without anything extra. UCSC was the oddest - like UCLA, he received the Top 1% letter, but then turned him down.

My son was also going to apply to Stanford, Princeton, U of Chicago, Harvey Mudd and WashU. When he got his EA decision, he dropped these plans. I have no reason to think he would not have been taken seriously.

To get into a top school, you need to be top student. Even kids who are going to top prep schools need a lot more than just a good report card. The same is true of HSers. I think HSers need better standardized test scores, but everyone needs other interests and areas of expertise. I think many HSers find this last part easier than school kids.
Home School Acceptances, Class of 2013! - College Discussion
A thread talking about college applications & acceptance for homeschoolers.

Homeschoolers Changing the World - Homeschooling Articles - Homeschool.com - Your Virtual Homeschool
Quote:
Marlyn McGrath Lewis, Director of Admissions for Harvard College says "We receive a good number of candidates every year with all or part of their education from a homeschool background. Homeschooling is broader than some people realize. We are looking for the strongest candidates in the world and we find some of those among homeschoolers."
As Homeschooled Population Tops 1 Million, More Seeking College Admission | Reuters

Quote:
Today, many colleges have a dedicated homeschool admissions officer, a
homeschool admissions policy, or both. Homeschoolers, like other students, can
qualify for federal financial aid in the form of grants and student
loans. And last year, the Common Application, a college application format
used by more than 300 schools, added a supplement for homeschooled students
to help streamline their application process, The Chronicle of Higher Education
reported.
This doesn't sound to me like homeschooled children are missing much. Harvard started admitting them in the 80's. Right now about 2% of the overall population is homeschooled. I think this will only increase. I do think there ARE teachers out there not doing their jobs. I don't see why anyone would take that personal. Even teachers MUST have had a teacher or two or three while going through their education that they know weren't good at their job, didn't care, etc. It HAPPENS - in all jobs. The problem is that depending on the child, a disconnected or even bad teacher can change the entire course of a child's education. I believe there are TONS of great teachers out there as well & I applaud them for what they do in the lives of children every day. "Bad teachers" actually don't even touch on why I would choose to homeschool though...it never even factored in. I would choose it to give my child the advantage of being able to work at his own pace & with a curriculum that suited HIS abilities. I was always ahead of other students & I think it does a disservice to a child to be bored in a class...or to hold them where their "age" is. This would also hold true if he happened to work slower, he should not have to deal with the social pressure or others making him feel as if he is stupid for not being at a certain level yet. ALL kids should be able to be educated without that pressure. Children blossom then there is no pressure & instead expectations are placed on effort rather than achievement .... I believe every child would do better in that environment - not worrying about how they measure up to others, but how they measure up to themselves & what progress THEY are making. In regular life we are always competing...but by & large if competition is what fuels you & gets you to do better, then someone failed at teaching you self discipline & motivation a LONG time ago. If you can do amazing when in competition & just so-so when not, then you need to examine what motivates you & why. You are always capable of doing your best when you want to do your best, it is just a matter of choosing to push yourself from an internal place rather than an external motivator. If you are motivated externally - you are giving your power & any control you may have in your life away. I truly believe my child would learn all of that better in the home. Now would I homeschool through high school? I don't know. I don't even know that I will do it at all - but I certainly am proud of those that take that on & I understand why they do.

I also know there are ways to network for socialization, field trips, subjects you don't feel strong on or simply can't teach (like maybe a foreign language or a higher math)... Lots of parents trade students & take advantage of each others strengths & support each other through the weaknesses.

(To the PP that was a teacherThe idea that a teacher would feel that someone homeschooled because of something that they felt was the mainstream "teacher's fault" is sad. No one should feel that way. Instead choose to see it through MY eyes. It is as though I have the opportunity to have someone like YOU one & one with my child....and just think of what YOU could teach a child if you truly could teach to that child, for their best advancement, without having to deal with discipline issues of other students, a "time" when you must move on to the next subject, etc. I bet even you have to admit - you could do some of those students an IMMENSE amount of good academically IF you had the freedom to do so & on a one-on-one basis.

Sorry for the book...
__________________
Read more: http://www.justmommies.com/forums/f4...xzz0DlWR8sL5&B (Homeschooling)
__________________
B - Crazy momma to my two boys
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  #3  
April 26th, 2009, 08:12 AM
KimberlyD0
Guest
Posts: n/a
I answered in the debates forum as well but my basic answer was a HECK NO!! LOL there is no way I would do that to my children. I am dislexic and I have ADHD, it would be more depromental to them then good.

We're blessed with an excellent education district here. My girls will be going to french Emergen. (Can't spell it) about 1/2 our city is french and not knowing french is whats held me back the most in terms of jobs. I have the college education, but not the french.

I want my girls to have that advantage, and I can't give that to them at home.

I don't care what others do, thats their business, but I want whats best for my kids, and for us thats school. (not saying homeschooling is worse, just not right for us)
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  #4  
April 26th, 2009, 10:55 AM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Crazytown
Posts: 1,798
Well my DS is still quite young but it's something I would love to learn more about. Since I haven't really done a lot of research and am still a bit ignorant to it all... I will share some of my concerns as I'm sure I'm not the only one.

I love the idea of homeschooling DS in the 'beginning' but I was a poor student (mostly due to peer pressure and my own insecurity) and I fear that if I homeschooled him that I wouldn't be able to teach him math and chemistry etc. because I wasn't very 'smart' in those subects. I'm sure we could learn an awful lot at home while he was young... but I'm worried that I'm not knowlegeable enough at a high school level. (or maybe we could learn together and BOTH get into a great college? LOL)

My other concern is, what if I end up having to go to work and *need* to put him in a traditional school? How will that affect him?

And then there's the not-that-social part of me (again those insecurities!!!) that worries that maybe I don't have the personality to homeschool in a way that would get him interacting with other homeschooled kids. I know that many homeschoolers are out and about with other moms and kids etc and I'm usually nervous and awkward around 'new' people. I'm scared we won't get out enough to be social and would hate for DS to deal with the same things I am dealing with now.

These are my hurdles and I am not quite committed to seriously looking into overcoming them now since I'm still a ways away from making the decision but I can't be the only one with some of these thoughts.
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  #5  
April 26th, 2009, 11:15 AM
kristen121's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,513
I've never really thought much about homeschooling, I always just thought I would send my kids to public schools. I don't know that I have what it takes to be a homeschooling mommy. I worry that I don't have the educational background to teach her everything she needs to know, espcially once she is past elementary school age. I am a working mommy and I don't think our financial situation will allow me to become a SAHM anytime soon, so I don't think I would be able to devote the time that homeschooling requires. I guess I don't know enough about homeschooling right now to say fpr certain that I will or will not do it, but right now I think that it is not the best choice for our family. But for those moms who can do it and do it well, I salute you!
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  #6  
April 26th, 2009, 11:49 AM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Bay Area CA
Posts: 19,074
I'm not against homeschooling at all. I was a teacher before becoming a SAHM, however I taught at a private school so I didn't get my full teaching credential since it's not what I went to university for. California recently passed a new law that says if you homeschool you have to be a credentialed teacher now. I think it is a super lame law.

DH and I are already discussing our schooling options for Lily. We happen to live in a neighborhood with an excellent public elementary school, but the middle school and high school aren't very good. Our plan right now is to start her in public school and put her in private if we feel it'd be more beneficial. If we went the homeschool route I'd have to get fully credentialed or talk my stepdad (my mom and him live with us) into teaching her since he has his credential.
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  #7  
April 26th, 2009, 05:05 PM
~Nik*Re~'s Avatar Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 4,954
I did homeschool Haylee and Hayden for awhile. I took them out of school because I was NOT happy with our district. I did it for the rest of that school year. It was HARD! I think it would have been much easier if they were my only children. I had a really tough time being pregnant and also with a 3 year old. But, it was fun while it lasted, and I definately would do it again IF Kentucky made it a little easier. It's a terrible state to try to homeschool in.
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  #8  
April 26th, 2009, 07:23 PM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Michigan
Posts: 26,363
I've strongly considered it. DH is still very iffy.

Quote:
Well my DS is still quite young but it's something I would love to learn more about. Since I haven't really done a lot of research and am still a bit ignorant to it all... I will share some of my concerns as I'm sure I'm not the only one.

I love the idea of homeschooling DS in the 'beginning' but I was a poor student (mostly due to peer pressure and my own insecurity) and I fear that if I homeschooled him that I wouldn't be able to teach him math and chemistry etc. because I wasn't very 'smart' in those subects. I'm sure we could learn an awful lot at home while he was young... but I'm worried that I'm not knowlegeable enough at a high school level. (or maybe we could learn together and BOTH get into a great college? LOL)

My other concern is, what if I end up having to go to work and *need* to put him in a traditional school? How will that affect him?

And then there's the not-that-social part of me (again those insecurities!!!) that worries that maybe I don't have the personality to homeschool in a way that would get him interacting with other homeschooled kids. I know that many homeschoolers are out and about with other moms and kids etc and I'm usually nervous and awkward around 'new' people. I'm scared we won't get out enough to be social and would hate for DS to deal with the same things I am dealing with now.

These are my hurdles and I am not quite committed to seriously looking into overcoming them now since I'm still a ways away from making the decision but I can't be the only one with some of these thoughts.
I have similiar concerns. I'm a very unmotivated person, so I'm worried I'll let things slip and unfortunately, it would be thier education that would suffer. I'm also not an extremely social person, I'd be perfectly happy not let leaving the house for a week. I want them to still get the social interaction, and if I'm not forced to do it, I usually try to shy away from it, so I would probably avoid homeschool groups.

We do have small schools here, I'm not sure about the quality of education yet. I may try them out for a year with Abby and see what I think after that.
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  #9  
April 26th, 2009, 09:31 PM
Effervescence's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twhylite21 View Post
I'm not against homeschooling at all. I was a teacher before becoming a SAHM, however I taught at a private school so I didn't get my full teaching credential since it's not what I went to university for. California recently passed a new law that says if you homeschool you have to be a credentialed teacher now. I think it is a super lame law.
I thought they went back on that a few months ago. If they didn't then Ohio is trying to do the same thing, and the day they do, I'm moving to Canada! No joke!

DH and I feel very strongly about homeschooling our children. I'll just leave it at that for now LOL I can get very passionate about it
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  #10  
April 27th, 2009, 01:30 AM
KatiesGirls
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Posts: n/a
No, we would not home school. We are praying for the means to be able to put them in a private christian school system.
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  #11  
April 27th, 2009, 09:09 AM
keekopeeko's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: virginia
Posts: 7,278
Well i cant say whether i will or wont.. i am for the option of homeschooling for sure.

BUT i MYSELF was home schooled all through my school years.. and i mostly loved it..and looking back i love all of it..

i was able to start college at 16.. i never had social problems. and was always an A student in college because of the self motivation that home schooling provided me with.

But also.. growing up home schooled ive seen it done the very wrong ways.. If you arent a motivated mom.. or a depressed mom (as one of my fellow home school families had) dont do it! BUT i say if you are a motivated mother who is NOT very social you should STILL home school! Ive seen the very "typical" home schooled child grow up with some social issues.. but over come them and succeed more than any other people i know in whatever they wanted to do. So what if the typical home schooled child eventually needs to go on "what not to wear" at least they can think for themselves as a human being and not run with their peers into whatever every one else is doing at the age of 12- 15- 17...

~Em
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  #12  
April 27th, 2009, 12:16 PM
broxi3781's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Location: belfast, northern ireland
Posts: 1,563
We will be homeschooling starting next fall. Northern Ireland has the earliest age for mandatory education in Europe, so they start P1, the equivalent of 1st grade at age 4.
I think this is far far too young. Also the local state school has closed. They have arranged a bus which parents will most likely have to pay for. It was £15 a month when they had a bus to the high school before that closed and that was only a 5 minute walk (Interface issues made walking unsafe).
I'll go into more detail on home schooling later this week when hopefully my brain is awake, but i really do think he will be better off at home for the first few years at least.
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  #13  
April 27th, 2009, 12:52 PM
Effervescence's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,791
Okay, now that it isn't so late and DS is down for a nap, I can answer more thoroughly.

Public schools just don't fit into mine and DH's parenting philosophy. It isn't anyone else's responsibility to provide education for our children. It is our responsibility, and our duty as parents. I highly respect teachers, and think they are doing a magnificent job. It isn't the teachers that we have issues with, it is the system and the ethics that go into creating a public school system in this particular setting that have DH and I concerned. DH is involved in a movement that is driving for the complete separation of school and state. In this country, I think that might be a wise direction to go in.

Ethically and philosophically, I cannot send my child to a public, state run school. A private school might be an option for us, but it is very close to impossible to find a private school that isn't religion based, and I don't think that school should be run by a religion just as much as I don't think it should be run by a state.

If I have to go back to work, I will find a job that works with my schooling schedule, or I would hire a teacher to come and do lessons. That isn't uncommon at all. There are also homeschooling groups, where parents can trade lessons, go on field trips, and let the kids be kids. MIL homeschooled, and DH and his siblings had so many opportunities that I never sought out in high school. SIL and DH played violin, and joined a youth orchestra that traveled all over the world. I played violin too, but had no need to join a youth orchestra because I had my school orchestra. BIL learned German through an immersion course. He still speaks German very fluently. I had high school language classes that taught to requirements rather than using the ways in which children learn language to their advantage. I also took college classes at the age of sixteen, and my younger brother (also public schooled) started at fifteen. He is graduating high school and will be entering college as a junior. So we did have opportunities, and we did come from a very good education system. BUT I can only imagine what opportunities we would have had if we had been homeschooled. We would have had all of the opportunities that we got through public school PLUS so many more.

Okay, now that it isn't so late and DS is down for a nap, I can answer more thoroughly.

Public schools just don't fit into mine and DH's parenting philosophy. It isn't anyone else's responsibility to provide education for our children. It is our responsibility, and our duty as parents. I highly respect teachers, and think they are doing a magnificent job. It isn't the teachers that we have issues with, it is the system and the ethics that go into creating a public school system in this particular setting that have DH and I concerned. DH is involved in a movement that is driving for the complete separation of school and state. In this country, I think that might be a wise direction to go in.

Ethically and philosophically, I cannot send my child to a public, state run school. A private school might be an option for us, but it is very close to impossible to find a private school that isn't religion based, and I don't think that school should be run by a religion just as much as I don't think it should be run by a state.

If I have to go back to work, I will find a job that works with my schooling schedule, or I would hire a teacher to come and do lessons. That isn't uncommon at all. There are also homeschooling groups, where parents can trade lessons, go on field trips, and let the kids be kids. MIL homeschooled, and DH and his siblings had so many opportunities that I never sought out in high school. SIL and DH played violin, and joined a youth orchestra that traveled all over the world. I played violin too, but had no need to join a youth orchestra because I had my school orchestra. BIL learned German through an immersion course. He still speaks German very fluently. I had high school language classes that taught to requirements rather than using the ways in which children learn language to their advantage. I also took college classes at the age of sixteen, and my younger brother (also public schooled) started at fifteen. He is graduating high school and will be entering college as a junior. So we did have opportunities, and we did come from a very good education system. BUT I can only imagine what opportunities we would have had if we had been homeschooled. We would have had all of the opportunities that we got through public school PLUS so many more.
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  #14  
April 27th, 2009, 05:21 PM
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Jess, I don't think they revoked the new law, but they may have. It was causing a lot of controversy!
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  #15  
April 28th, 2009, 04:18 AM
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its something i've been thinking over alot.
here its illegal to homeschool, which makes things difficult (though as i'm english i have the perfect excuse) but children don't legally have to start school here until they are six, before that is just preschool.
So we're going to skip the preschool and homeschool her until shes six, that way i can get a good grounding of english into her before she starts school. she'll do a ballet class to make some friends and we're working on a network of playdates for extra socialisation.
the schools here look old fashioned and boring, i worry that they will kill her natural desire to learn.. if thats the case then i'll pull her out if i have to.

but who knows, i have confidence in the schooling in england (aside from it starting too early) so if we move back again then she'll go to school as normal i think.
x
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  #16  
April 28th, 2009, 06:29 AM
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If we homeschool depends on where we are stationed at, what their schools are like, how Caiden copes with traditional schooling/or private school, things like that. We are open to it, though. I was homeschooled from 1st-5th grade because we lived in Washington DC at the time, and the school we were zoned for wasn't real great. I LOVED it, and we got to see so much more of DC that way as my mother worked it into our schoolwork.
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  #17  
April 28th, 2009, 11:14 AM
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I think homeschooling can be a wonderful thing if done correctly...like a PP said.

But I will not be homeschooling my children...I am dyslexic and still struggle with speeling and reading. And even though I pulled off all A's and B's in HS and college I really had to apply myslef. I don't think it would be fair for my kids if I homeschooled them.

We are blessed to have a top-notch public school system where we live. Plus I think going to school out side the home is a great growth oppertunity for children. It lets them experience other cultures and ways of doing things. Of course I will be involved in their school lives and volunteer for the PTA and help with homework and so on. But I want my children to experience public school.
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  #18  
April 28th, 2009, 01:07 PM
oriel13's Avatar Tishauna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andi2284 View Post
I have similiar concerns. I'm a very unmotivated person, so I'm worried I'll let things slip and unfortunately, it would be thier education that would suffer. I'm also not an extremely social person, I'd be perfectly happy not let leaving the house for a week. I want them to still get the social interaction, and if I'm not forced to do it, I usually try to shy away from it, so I would probably avoid homeschool groups.
to everything Andrea said. It would be a last resort for me, not because I think there's anything wrong with it, but because I am already pretty sure at this early point that it wouldn't be a good fit for our family. If we lived in an area where the public schools weren't any good, and there were no acceptable private school options, then I wouldn't hesitate to homeschool my children.

I give major props to homeschooling parents though!
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  #19  
April 28th, 2009, 01:23 PM
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to everything Andrea said. It would be a last resort for me, not because I think there's anything wrong with it, but because I am already pretty sure at this early point that it wouldn't be a good fit for our family. If we lived in an area where the public schools weren't any good, and there were no acceptable private school options, then I wouldn't hesitate to homeschool my children.

I give major props to homeschooling parents though!

Ditto that!!!
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  #20  
April 28th, 2009, 02:36 PM
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At the moment I've no plans to homeschool and I haven't really looked into what it would involve or whether it is even legal here. But if it turned out that Ben wasn't getting on at school, then perhaps I'd take him out and home-school him if I thought he would do better from the one-to-one tuition.
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