Secondhand Smoke and Fertility

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By JustMommies staff

Now there is another reason for parents not to smoke around their kids, or better yet, quit smoking all together. We all know that second hand smoke is bad for kids and the other people stuck breathing in the toxic fumes, but a new study suggests that secondhand smoke can actually cause permanent damage to a woman’s fertility.

According to a new report from Reuters, women whose parents exposed them to secondhand smoke were 39% more likely to have had a miscarriage. They also had a 26% higher chance of having problems conceiving if they were exposed to secondhand smoke.

The study conducted looked at 4,800 women treated at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. The women participating in the study gave researchers details about their smoking history including their exposure to secondhand smoke. They also told researchers about any attempts they had made to get pregnant as well as details about previous pregnancies or history of miscarriage.

Eleven percent of the women in the study had difficulty conceiving and about a third of the women had at least one miscarriage or pregnancy loss, according to findings published in the journal Tobacco Control.

Researchers believe that it is possible that the toxins in secondhand smoke may interfere with the hormones involved in fertility and pregnancy.

Luke Peppone, a researcher at the University of Rochester in New York who helped conduct the study, made a statement about the findings saying, “These statistics are breathtaking and certainly points to yet another danger of secondhand smoke exposure.”

http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSTRE4B405120081205

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