Vaccinations

Getting a Shot: Vaccine & Immunizations Update

By Elizabeth Seward

Humans have managed to utilize science to outsmart illnesses that used to wipe out entire populations at a time. We've done this through medical advances, most particularly, through vaccines and immunizations. A sick baby is the last thing you need, so be sure to keep your little one immunized with the latest vaccines in accordance with the latest credible research available. » Read more

6 Things You Didn't Know About the Gardasil Vaccine

There is a lot of controversy over vaccines, and especially over one being recommended for young girls before puberty, when the virus is a sexually transmitted one. Here are six things you may not know about Gardasil, which is a recombinant vaccine created for the prevention of cervical cancer. 1. Who and what is Gardasil for? » Read more

Inhabitots on JustMommies: The 411 On Vaccines

By Inhabitots

As a new parent, sifting through all of the various research and opinions on childhood immunizations is daunting and confusing at best. Vaccines have been making headline news during the past year, mostly due to their  » Read more

Pregnant Women, Infants Should be First to get Swine Flu Vaccine

By JustMommies

In a press conference Wednesday, members from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices panel revealed that pregnant women, children six months and older and health care workers should be first on the priority list of swine flu vaccinations this fall. » Read more

Rotavirus: The Facts

By JustMommies

If you’ve had a child recently, you may have noticed a new addition to your baby’s vaccine schedule. On January 1st, 2007, The American Academy of Pediatrics published a revised recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents. One major change to the schedule was the addition of the live oral Rotavirus vaccine. It is recommended to be given at 2, 4 and 6 months of age. » Read more

Measles

By JustMommies

Measles is a respiratory infection caused by a highly contagious virus. It occurs most often in the late winter and spring. Also known as rubeola, measles has more or less been eradicated in the United States, where vaccination has been available since the 1960s. Outside of the US, there are still approximately 20,000,000 reported cases of measles every year, particularly in undeveloped countries.   » Read more

The Vaccination Debate: Pros and Cons of Vaccinations

By JustMommies

You may have noticed lately the topic of routine childhood vaccines once again gaining a lot of media attention. Most parents of this generation never had to experience what life was like before vaccines were used. Public health officials credit the mandating of mass vaccination to the almost extinct instances of the communicable disease vaccines help prevent. So why are routine vaccinations such a hot parenting debate? It would be nearly impossible to include all the information available on vaccines in one article. The following content will cover the basics of the vaccine debate. » Read more

The Facts About Vaccinations

By JustMommies

Before vaccines were created, the only way for the body to build up immunity to certain diseases was to actually be exposed to them. If a person survived the disease, their body’s immune system created anti-bodies that protected them from future exposure. This was a very unpleasant experience, as many of the illnesses vaccines help prevent today are very serious. Most people died or became permanently ill. This is also referred to as natural immunity.   » Read more