weaning

What Is a Nursing Strike?

You and your baby have developed a good, solid breastfeeding routine when suddenly baby simply won't nurse. Baby is hungry and upset. She is cranky and wants to eat-but refuses. What is going on? Is it time to wean? What should you do? » Read more

What is Baby Led Weaning?

Baby led weaning, or baby led solids, is a really simple concept and just means letting your baby feed himself when he is ready for solids.  Most Americans think of weaning as giving up breastfeeding, but in the UK where the term “baby led weaning” originated, weaning means the transition to solid foods.  » Read more

How To Introduce Formula to a Breastfed Baby

By JustMommies

When your baby has been exclusively breastfed, it can be difficult for you and your baby to make a transition to formula. You have to make a physical and emotional adjustment away from the time you spent nursing, and your baby needs to learn a new set of feeding skills. However, even though babies love their routines, they are amazingly adaptable. » Read more

Comfort Measures for Mom and Baby While Weaning

As a breastfeeding mother, you’ve shared a very intense physical and emotional experience with your baby. When it finally comes time for weaning, you will probably go through a range of emotions from sadness to relief. For some moms this can be an especially rough period. » Read more

To Wean or Not to Wean? That is the Question

By Andy Steiner, Author of Spilled Milk: Breastfeeding Adventures and Advice from Less-Than-Perfect Moms

This could either feel like a beacon of light on the horizon or a sad reality of life: At some point, every mother stops breastfeeding. Some start thinking about stopping not long after they've begun. Others find that nursing becomes such an important and rewarding part of their lives that they feel like they could go on forever. » Read more

Mommy Tips for Drying up Breast Milk

If you are having a baby and not planning to breastfeed, you may be interested in hearing the quickest ways to dry up your breast milk. Your milk will dry up on its own within a week or so if you do not nurse. You may, however, experience engorgement after your milk comes in. There are some things you can do to help relieve the discomfort of being engorged. » Read more