Log In Sign Up

I'm curious...


Forum: Heated Debates

Notices

Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards.

We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to [email protected].

Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on!

Reply Post New Topic
  Subscribe To Heated Debates LinkBack Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
  #1  
June 26th, 2008, 11:27 AM
Erin's First's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,829
Do you think new moms feel pressured to BF or at least try it before resorting to FF b/c it's the best form of feeding your baby?
__________________
<div align="center">
</div>
Reply With Quote
  #2  
June 26th, 2008, 01:36 PM
frgsonmysox's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Offutt AFB, NE
Posts: 19,799
Not at all, I think it's actually the opposite. I've never been pressured to breastfeed, but I surely have been pressured to just give my baby a bottle, or a paci, or to supplement with formula.
__________________
~Beth~ Wife to my Airman Chris, and mommy to: Anthony Nathaniel (8/31/04), Anastasia Fae (8/01/06), Baby C (lost on 10/12/07), David Cillian (7/31/08), Charles George (4/29/10), and Alan Christopher (2/22/12)





My BLOG - A Day In The Life of a Freg (it's a little bit of everything!)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
June 26th, 2008, 01:50 PM
LorieB's Avatar Super Mommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 699
Quote:
Not at all, I think it's actually the opposite. I've never been pressured to breastfeed, but I surely have been pressured to just give my baby a bottle, or a paci, or to supplement with formula.[/b]
Ditto. The breastfeeding rates would be way higher if anyone felt like they had to breastfeed.
__________________





Reply With Quote
  #4  
June 26th, 2008, 01:51 PM
SweetSimpleThings's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: B.C., Canada
Posts: 7,832
I'd say the opposite (to frgsonmysox) - but as we've figured out in other threads, things are different here. BFing is hands down the expected way for moms to feed their babies.

In prenatal classes we are asked who is going to breastfeed (no one in my class said "no"), and one whole session is on BFing. We are strongly encouraged not to give pacis at all until after BFing is going fine. A baby in a hospital would NEVER be given formula unless the doctor had said it had to be - they bring the baby to the mom (actually most babies room in) for feedings. A mom can't ask for formula in the hospital and be given it - it would have to be ok'ed by the doctor (or you'd have to bring your own, I guess.) Free formula bags are NOT handed out here (I'd never heard of them till I started posting on JM).

All of this is great and provides lots of support for those who are BFing. But for those with problems, the pressure that this expectation creates is overwhelming. I literally felt like I had failed myself and my baby - and had doomed him to a life of lesser health, lower IQ and untold problems - when after two months of trying everything under the sun we finally acknowledged it wasn't working.

So, in answer to the OP, yes, there is pressure for moms to BF and to not use formula. But as I've learned through this site, the same is not necessarily true everywhere.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #5  
June 26th, 2008, 02:56 PM
~Jess~'s Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Central California
Posts: 16,959
Quote:
Not at all, I think it's actually the opposite. I've never been pressured to breastfeed, but I surely have been pressured to just give my baby a bottle, or a paci, or to supplement with formula.[/b]


I've even been told to just give my 8-week-old baby a formula bottle right before bed WITH CEREAL in it to help baby sleep better. I've had a pedi tell me to stop breastfeeding. It's been suggested that I just give *1* bottle so that I can get more rest, etc.

In my pedi's office I was always asked which formula I was feeding my baby rather than whether I was breastfeeding or not. The nurses ask how you'll be feeding your baby as soon as you give birth, there is no assumption that you'll be nursing.

I could go on and on....
__________________






Reply With Quote
  #6  
June 26th, 2008, 02:56 PM
LorieB's Avatar Super Mommy
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 699
I'm from Canada originally and most of my friends and all of my family still are there. New moms there are still pressured to FF especially if the baby is small, not sleeping through the night, feeds a lot, etc. There are plenty of hospitals that still carry formula. A friend of mine had to spend 24 hours in the hospital after having her baby and she was warned about not giving in to the pressure from the nurses to switch to formula. My DH still plays baseball with his old buddies every summer back home in Canada and last summer 5 of the wives on the team had babies. Not one of those babies was ever fed an ounce of breastmilk and nobody even flinched about it. In fact, the joke was made about me not being able to have a drink with them since I was STILL nursing my toddler. Sure, Canada's breastfeeding rates are way higher than the US but they are still far from 100%.

And as for pressure, I don't see it any different than a parent of an older child feeling pressure to feed their kids vegetables instead of french fries because they know one is better than the other.

Again, this only applies to people that choose to formula feed, not those who couldn't or who tried and couldn't.
__________________





Reply With Quote
  #7  
June 26th, 2008, 05:01 PM
Tofu Bacon
Guest
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Not at all, I think it's actually the opposite. I've never been pressured to breastfeed, but I surely have been pressured to just give my baby a bottle, or a paci, or to supplement with formula.[/b]
Ditto. I've been both: a formula-feeding mom and a breastfeeding mom. There was no pressure to breastfeed because formula-feeding after 6 weeks is totally the norm. Now I get hassled my my mom and mil over why I don't just give her formula by now, since its "just as good". Besides, how am I supposed to put cereal in her bottle at night if I don't give her a bottle?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
June 26th, 2008, 07:08 PM
beck12's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 12,330
I don't know. I think whether someone feels pressured is entirely different than when someone is actually being pressured. For instance...i NEVER once felt pressure to drink in HS....even when I was at a party when clearly everyone else was drinking & I was answering questions regarding why I wasn't drinking. It isn't my personality to care what others think very much, so I never associated that with feeling pressured. I think ti was because I was certain I was making a good choice. (That isn't to say I never drank in HS ...just saying I often chose not to as well). I think the same applies to everything in our lives. I felt like people tried to get me to give formula, etc....but I can't say as I felt pressured. I did feel a little pressure not to NIP...and maybe that is because I HAD to work on getting comfortable with that myself. I don't know. But that is my take on "pressure" as a concept. I do think we should be at a place where people are educated about BF in a real way - educated about not just the benefits, but also the pitfalls & how hard it is, reasons some women don't succeed & how to avoid those situations (when avoidable), etc. I also think all moms to be should be encouraged to BF. It is the healthiest choice for almost all moms & almost every baby. That being the case, I can't see why we wouldn't encourage all women to try & then support them in ways to help them succeed.
__________________
B - Crazy momma to my two boys
We've begun to raise daughters more like sons... but few have the courage to raise our sons more like our daughters. ~Gloria Steinem

If a man has been his mother's undisputed darling he retains throughout life the triumphant feeling, the confidence in success, which not seldom brings actual success along with it. ~Sigmund Freud
My mom is a neverending song in my heart of comfort, happiness, and being. I may sometimes forget the words but I always remember the tune. ~Graycie Harmon
Don't wait to make your son a great man - make him a great boy. ~Author Unknown
You don't raise heroes, you raise sons. And if you treat them like sons, they'll turn out to be heroes, even if it's just in your own eyes. ~Walter M. Schirra, Sr.
A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest. ~Irish Proverb
Mother's love is peace. It need not be acquired, it need not be deserved. ~Erich Fromm
Children need love, especially when they do not deserve it. - Harold Hulbert
Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of little children. ~William Makepeace Thackeray
God could not be everywhere, so he created mothers. ~Jewish Proverb
The best conversations with mothers always take place in silence, when only the heart speaks. ~Carrie Latet




Reply With Quote
  #9  
June 27th, 2008, 09:14 AM
Tiffers's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 5,197
Quote:
I don't know. I think whether someone feels pressured is entirely different than when someone is actually being pressured. For instance...i NEVER once felt pressure to drink in HS....even when I was at a party when clearly everyone else was drinking & I was answering questions regarding why I wasn't drinking. It isn't my personality to care what others think very much, so I never associated that with feeling pressured. I think ti was because I was certain I was making a good choice. (That isn't to say I never drank in HS ...just saying I often chose not to as well). I think the same applies to everything in our lives.[/b]
That's how I feel as well. It always seemed like it was my choice on what I was doing. I did still find it odd during the visits to the ped when their question was "what kind of formula are you using" as opposed to "are you breastfeeding or formula feeding". They just seemed to assume I was FF, and were a bit shocked when I'd say my baby was 100% breastfed.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
June 27th, 2008, 11:58 AM
TheOtherMichelle's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 8,765
Quote:
Quote:
I don't know. I think whether someone feels pressured is entirely different than when someone is actually being pressured. For instance...i NEVER once felt pressure to drink in HS....even when I was at a party when clearly everyone else was drinking & I was answering questions regarding why I wasn't drinking. It isn't my personality to care what others think very much, so I never associated that with feeling pressured. I think ti was because I was certain I was making a good choice. (That isn't to say I never drank in HS ...just saying I often chose not to as well). I think the same applies to everything in our lives.[/b]
That's how I feel as well. It always seemed like it was my choice on what I was doing. I did still find it odd during the visits to the ped when their question was "what kind of formula are you using" as opposed to "are you breastfeeding or formula feeding". They just seemed to assume I was FF, and were a bit shocked when I'd say my baby was 100% breastfed.
[/b]
I guess it all depends. I never felt pressured to FF or BF by anyone in my personal life or medical staff, until I had already made the decision to BF and both the nurse at my hospital and our pediatrician helped me out when I needed it. When I went to the pedi they'd ask BF or FF and which formula if applicable.
__________________







Reply With Quote
  #11  
June 27th, 2008, 06:23 PM
Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 6,149
Quote:
I guess it all depends. I never felt pressured to FF or BF by anyone in my personal life or medical staff, until I had already made the decision to BF and both the nurse at my hospital and our pediatrician helped me out when I needed it. When I went to the pedi they'd ask BF or FF and which formula if applicable.[/b]
same here, except that I FF. But the pedi asked first, she didnt' just assume I was FFing.
__________________
~Amber~

Reply With Quote
  #12  
June 29th, 2008, 01:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 11
I think, at least in many circles, there is pressure to "try" to breastfeed. And many women seem to be easily convinced that they have low milk supply or the baby is allergic to something they are eating, and then they can safely and conscious free put the baby on formula because "they had to." When in reality, they just didn't want to do it in the first place (or for long). Maybe I'm cynical, but I see this far too much and its kind of irritating.

I actually have a lot more respect for the mom who just says that she doesn't want to.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
June 29th, 2008, 10:21 PM
SweetSimpleThings's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: B.C., Canada
Posts: 7,832
Quote:
I think, at least in many circles, there is pressure to "try" to breastfeed. And many women seem to be easily convinced that they have low milk supply or the baby is allergic to something they are eating, and then they can safely and conscious free put the baby on formula because "they had to." When in reality, they just didn't want to do it in the first place (or for long). Maybe I'm cynical, but I see this far too much and its kind of irritating.[/b]
Wow, impressive psychic skills ... so you *know* what someone did and didn't want to do in the first place?

As for it being "irritating" ... why? Why would this irritate you? As in, you get irritated over the lack of information and support available to those women? Or simply the women who say this irritate you?

Quote:
I actually have a lot more respect for the mom who just says that she doesn't want to.[/b]


Comments like this are why women like me - who really couldn't, not just "didn't want to in the first place" - feel that other women are looking down on us. Because, according to statements like this, you do!

When someone says "you just didn't want to enough" it's like telling someone who can't get pregnant that "if they just relaxed it'd happen"... it's ignorant and condescending.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #14  
June 29th, 2008, 11:01 PM
hotjai21's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 14,852
Not really, i had decided before i conceved that i would bf. No one really asked me whether i was going to or not when i was pg. And i never felt like people were cheering me on- since i had chosen to.

and i agree that alot of people think that they have small boobies so theres not going to be enough milk, or that their baby will starve before your supply gets in fully, which is not true.
__________________
Jessica, married to Adam, mommy to 4 beautiful girls





Reply With Quote
  #15  
July 2nd, 2008, 08:47 PM
SweetSimpleThings's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: B.C., Canada
Posts: 7,832
Quote:
Not really, i had decided before i conceved that i would bf. No one really asked me whether i was going to or not when i was pg. And i never felt like people were cheering me on- since i had chosen to.

and i agree that alot of people think that they have small boobies so theres not going to be enough milk, or that their baby will starve before your supply gets in fully, which is not true.[/b]
It's not true *most* of the time, but actually it can and does happen. In fact, there were a few stories in the news in the last few years in which this exact thing happened: moms who were determined to EBF, who were told over and over again that weight loss was normal (which it is, to a certain extent) and that their milk would come in if they only continued to BF .... and their babies died.

Before I get flamed on this, I am *not* saying that this is terribly common, but it can and does happen. There is simply NO blanket assertion you can make about any facet of the human body and how it operates that applies in all cases. Our menstrual flows are all different, our eyesight and our ability to hear is different, every single body is slightly different than everyone else's in every single way - it is not impossible for "milk production" to possibly also be different.

Anyway, aside from that, I'm still really curious to hear back from "Grace and Violet" on her comments .....

__________________

Reply With Quote
  #16  
July 3rd, 2008, 03:45 PM
Tammyjh's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: North
Posts: 7,824
Quote:
Quote:
Not really, i had decided before i conceved that i would bf. No one really asked me whether i was going to or not when i was pg. And i never felt like people were cheering me on- since i had chosen to.

and i agree that alot of people think that they have small boobies so theres not going to be enough milk, or that their baby will starve before your supply gets in fully, which is not true.[/b]
It's not true *most* of the time, but actually it can and does happen. In fact, there were a few stories in the news in the last few years in which this exact thing happened: moms who were determined to EBF, who were told over and over again that weight loss was normal (which it is, to a certain extent) and that their milk would come in if they only continued to BF .... and their babies died.

Before I get flamed on this, I am *not* saying that this is terribly common, but it can and does happen. There is simply NO blanket assertion you can make about any facet of the human body and how it operates that applies in all cases. Our menstrual flows are all different, our eyesight and our ability to hear is different, every single body is slightly different than everyone else's in every single way - it is not impossible for "milk production" to possibly also be different.

Anyway, aside from that, I'm still really curious to hear back from "Grace and Violet" on her comments .....
[/b]
I think what she meant was that some people think that colostrum isn't enough for baby in the first few days before moms milk comes in. Thats not true.

__________________
Tammy, Mom to
Abby (19), Kacie (13), Chase (11), & Jacob (7)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"...They're supposed to make you miserable! That's why they're family!" ~ Bobby ~ Supernatural
Reply With Quote
  #17  
July 4th, 2008, 10:47 PM
LaLa's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 11,576
Do you have proof, articles, anything where babies have "just died"?

Lala...
__________________




My BBT Chart





DEBT PAY DOWN!!!
Baby Step #1 DONE ($1k in ER savings!)

<a href="http://www.TickerFactory.com/debt/wRzFQue/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">

</a>
Reply With Quote
  #18  
July 5th, 2008, 11:11 AM
TheOtherMichelle's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 8,765
Quote:
Do you have proof, articles, anything where babies have "just died"?

Lala...[/b]
Anecdotal evidence only, but my friend had to supplement formula for her daughter in the first couple weeks. When I'd heard that her dd had lost a lot of weight and the doctor recommended her supplementing, I tried to be reassuring and tell her that my dd also lost weight (enough for the pedi to say come back in a week and we'll see what happens) but that she did fine and gained it all back by the next week. But the first time I saw my friends daughter, I could tell a huge difference in what my dd had lost and what hers did, and understood the doctors recommendations. Fortunately my friend was very self-informed and was able to EBF after a couple weeks.

I know it's not quite what you were looking for, but from my personal experience I don't see it outside the realm of possibility that a newborn can be at risk for, if not death, than major health problems due to mom's low milk supply.

I did some research and found an interesting study

Quote:
Most infants with hypernatraemic dehydration are healthy term infants who are discharged home a few days after birth and hungrily suck at the breast for long periods but demonstrate failure to thrive. They usually fail to meet the minimum requirement of six wet diaper changes per day and may have infrequent stools. By the time they present to hospital, significant weight loss in excess of 10% of their birth-weight has occurred. Jaundice, renal failure and seizures are recognized complications, however neurological complications may identify those infants at higher risk for mortality (2, 3, 6–8). The presence of seizures in the fatal case concurs with this finding. The age at presentation of the babies in this series, the presenting clinical features, the complications seen and the outcome are similar to those described in the literature.

Prevention of mortality and morbidity related to breast-feeding failure must begin with education and follow through with a targeted approach that identifies high-risk mothers and infants. Antenatal preparation of mothers should include an introduction to breastfeeding techniques and proper preparation of the breast. First-time mothers should not be discharged from hospital until proper breastfeeding technique is observed. Mothers with identifiable problems should be referred promptly to lactation management specialists and close follow-up should be maintained following discharge. In addition, all mothers should be educated about the features that may indicate inadequate intake and advised about the importance of seeking medical attention early.

This case series highlights an uncommon but easily preventable complication of breastfeeding that is associated with mortality and significant morbidity. It is important that physicians and nurses become aware of the risk factors and clinical features of breastfeeding failure so that prevention and early intervention can be maximized.[/b]
I really like their conclusion.
__________________







Reply With Quote
  #19  
July 5th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Little Mrs Sunshine
Guest
Posts: n/a
I feel formula is what is pushed on parents. i dont think women feel pressured to breast feed, but they may feel guilty if they don't (I know I would feel guilty if I knowingly did less then best I was *able* to for my child - but not because anyone else made me feel that way). where as some feel pressured to formula feed, then feel guilty when they do.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
July 5th, 2008, 02:36 PM
SweetSimpleThings's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: B.C., Canada
Posts: 7,832
Quote:
Do you have proof, articles, anything where babies have "just died"?

Lala...[/b]
Well, first of all, I never used the term "just died" - in fact, I said that there were cases where the moms were told over and over, it's ok, it's fine, just keep going and the babies died. No baby just up and dies all of a sudden from starvation or dehydration complications. Were there compounding factors, such as lack of education, poverty or insufficient support? Yes. But the primary cause was simply not enough milk getting into the baby's tummy (either due to not enough milk coming out of mom's breasts, or enough milk being produced but baby unable to access it). In retrospect, we can look at these cases and say what might have fixed it (although there isn't always a fix other than to *gasp* supplement") but at the time, when you are committed to BFing and you truly feel (as I did) that even that one ounce of formula is going to severely impact your supply and make things harder for you, you just keep going and keep trying, and keep believing that if you just try hard enough it will work.

*Let me be totally clear, I am NOT saying that many babies lives haven't been saved from breastfeeding because of, for example, lower SIDS rates ... I am very simply responding to the point that people like to make that your baby won't starve before your milk comes in. I have also repeatedly said it is very low. My point is simply saying: it can and does happen. Primary insufficient milk is believed to occur in about 5 per cent of mom/baby dyads (that's a LOT when you think about, that's five moms in 100!) and secondary insufficient milk (ie body has capacity to make enough milk, but a secondary cause is inhibiting the ability for transfer) in an additional 10 to 15 per cent. So, when you are sitting there feeding your baby, and he's getting thinner and thinner and thinner and everyone keeps saying "keep going, your milk will come, weight loss is normal" at what point do you think "hmm, I might be one of the 5 per cent ... or there might be other issues going on here". So when someone says "that doesn't happen" it pisses me off. The implication is: it doesn't happen, you screwed up somewhere along the line. It does happen.

At any rate, here are a few related articles and pieces of information...

From Newsweek:
Quote:
Addressing the subject is critical. If low milk supply is not rectified promptly, infants can become severely malnourished. In rare instances, breast-fed babies have died; a Brooklyn, N.Y., woman whose breast-fed infant died of starvation was charged with criminally negligent homicide (the charge was later dropped). "People don't like to talk about this in the breast-feeding-promotion world," says Marianne Neifert, a Denver-based pediatrician and lactation specialist. When Neifert first published her data on failed breast-feeding in the late 1980s, "nobody wanted to hear it," she says. But gradually the breast-feeding establishment has come around. "Insufficient milk is real," says Ruth Lawrence, a neonatologist and member of La Leche League International's Health Advisory Council. "Sometimes it's due to lack of support and information. Sometimes it's unavoidable."[/b]
http://www.newsweek.com/id/87432

This one was not a death, but a dehydration-induced stroke at eight days (there are MANY news stories online of cerebral palsy and other medical issues resulting from dehydration strokes in infants who's moms were trying to EBF, unsuccessfully):
Quote:
From Time magazine
At 6 lbs. 5 oz., Bradley Erwin looked like a healthy baby when he was born last March. He just didn't seem to get the hang of breast-feeding. His mother Kimberly, 38, a medical technician, tried to nurse him. "He would bob his head, root and try to latch on, but he wasn't getting anywhere," she recalls. "Everybody kept saying, 'Don't worry. Don't worry."' It was bad advice. When the infant was 12 days old, his parents rushed him to Children's Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. His breathing was shallow; his eyes had rolled back. "I was frantic because I could see he was withering," she recalls. Doctors found the child's weight had slipped below 5 lbs. Their diagnosis: severe dehydration. Bradley was starving. A few days later, he suffered a stroke. Just how much damage it caused remains to be seen.[/b]
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/...,164956,00.html

Not completely related, but interesting: From the Archives of Disease in Childhood Fetal and Neonatal Edition 2002;87:F158
Quote:
Keywords: hypernatraemia; dehydration; breast feeding

Hypernatraemic dehydration is a potentially lethal condition and is associated with cerebral oedema, intracranial haemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and gangrene.1 The infant’s plasma sodium concentration is raised predominantly because of loss of extracellular water
EPIDEMIOLOGY
Hypernatraemia was previously thought to be unusual in breast fed babies. Nevertheless, from 1979 to 1989 there were sporadic reports of hypernatraemic dehydration occurring in breast fed babies.5–10 In the 1990s there was an increase in the number of breast fed infants reported to have hypernatraemic dehydration.11–17 Cooper et al14 described five such infants born between 1991 and 1994 in Ohio, van der Heide et al15 two further cases from the Netherlands, Ng et al11 described five cases in Hong Kong, Livingstone et al13 reported 21 cases in British Columbia between 1991 and 1995, and Paul et al16 identified a further two infants in Vellore, India. In the United Kingdom, Oddie et al12 added a further eight cases from the Northern Region of England in 1998, and Harding et al17 estimate that in Bristol they see one infant per month with hypernatraemic dehydration.

Over a period of 18 months in Edinburgh, 13 of almost 9000 infants born were admitted to the neonatal unit at less than 3 weeks of age with hypernatraemic dehydration. All were breast fed. In our study, the plasma sodium concentrations of these infants ranged from 150 to 173 mmol/l. Seven infants were readmitted having already been discharged home, but six were diagnosed on the postnatal wards before discharge (unpublished data). Few cases have previously been described to occur in hospital.11,18

It is thought that in the United States too there is an increased infant morbidity caused by inadequate breast feeding,19 and this epidemic coincides with a time when breast feeding rates have reached their highest levels of the last half century. Reports of hypernatraemic dehydration have not been confined to the medical literature. The United States recognised the problem in the early 1990s, and identified in an article in the Wall Street Journal that many cases occurred in infants of affluent professional parents.20 Time magazine and various American television programmes briefly highlighted this apparently new epidemic.

The incidence of this condition is difficult to ascertain. Even a recent prospective study from Italy fails to answer the question. Manganaro et al21 included all healthy breast fed neonates referred to their neonatal unit, but did not quote the criteria for referral nor the background population from which the referrals came. The infants were weighed on a daily basis from birth until discharge, and staff intervened if the weight loss was greater than 10%. They found that, of 686 neonates referred over a six month period, 53 had a weight loss of > 10% and 19 had a plasma sodium concentration > 149 mmol/l (range 150–160 mmol/l). Maximal weight loss was observed on the third to fourth day in vaginally delivered infants, and the fourth to fifth day in caesarian delivered infants. The study does not record the infants’ ages at the time of maximal plasma sodium concentrations.[/b]
The case of Tabitha Walrond was particularly featured in the media - yes, her poverty and lack of access to medical support was part of the issue, but she truly felt she was doing what was best: exclusively breastfeeding. And her child died. There are many groups working to reverse her jail sentence even now. She is also not the only mom that this has happened to, I came across several similar cases, hers is simply the most publicized. (interestingly, there was a news article that referenced the case of two white, middle-class moms who lost their children in similar circumstances, but were not charged, and compared their situations to the Walrond case, in which a young, lower class, black mother WAS charged, but I couldn't find information on the specifics around the cases of the two white moms. At any rate, here's an article on the Walrond case: http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/1999/05/21/nursing/
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:32 AM.