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Victoria's Secret vs. Nursing Moms


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  #1  
June 29th, 2006, 09:17 AM
Sunflower_Mommy2003's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 29, 2006

“A Tale of Two Nursing Moms”

Racine, WI – This Saturday, two moms are organizing a nationwide nurse-in of the popular lingerie store, Victoria’s Secret. Prompted by run-ins with Victoria’s Secret employees, Rebecca Cook, of Burlington, WI and Jessie Chandler, of Quincy, MA have decided to do something about state and federal laws that do not protect nursing mothers.

On June 21, 2006, Rebecca Cook entered a Victoria’s Secret store with a friend to browse through the sales racks. While in the store, Mrs. Cook’s daughter wanted to nurse, so she went to the dressing room and asked for one. When a dressing room wasn’t available, she said that she’d sit out of the way and nurse her daughter, and was told that she wasn’t allowed to by a store employee, that she would have to use a restroom. After she refused to use a restroom to nurse her daughter, a dressing room opened up, and while she was in it, the two store employees were heard loudly discussing, right outside her dressing room, to make sure if there’s an occupied sign that the dressing room is truly occupied and to get customers in and out of the dressing rooms as soon as possible. Mrs. Cook left the dressing room because of their rudeness, nursing her daughter on her way out of the store. When she called to complain to the store manager, she was told that the employee probably asked her to nurse in the restroom because the sight of her breasts might offend a customer. Taking the complaint of the treatment by the store manager to the corporate customer service wasn’t any further help, because she was told that women are not allowed to try on clothing in the middle of the store, therefore they are not allowed to nurse in the middle of the sales floor.

In a similar incident, Jessie Chandler entered a Victoria’s Secret store on June 22, 2006 to browse the sales racks as well, after feeding her daughter. A saleswoman approached her to welcome her to Victoria’s Secret, and Mrs. Chandler asked to use a changing room. When asked by the sales associate if she was going to change her daughter’s diaper, Mrs. Chandler said that she was going to nurse her, to which the sales associate replied with giving directions to the bathroom outside the store. Mrs. Chandler refused to use the bathroom, and the attendant said that it was unsanitary for her to nurse in the dressing room because people change in them. When Mrs. Chandler called the store manager, she received an apology. Mrs. Chandler called Victoria’s Secret’s corporate office after hearing of Mrs. Cook’s experience with corporate’s customer service, and was told that Mrs. Chandler’s experience was an isolated experience and that she would have a letter of apology sent out to her.

This nurse-in is not about Victoria’s Secret’s lack of enforcing their company policy; the company only prompted the awareness for a need for state and federal protection for nursing mothers. The federal government has invested a lot of time and money into advertising about breastfeeding being the best nutrition for babies, but without federal protection, some moms might give up when they’re told that breast milk is dirty and unsanitary. To make those federal dollars most effective, we have to protect and educate; protect a mother’s right to nurse in public, and educate those that work with the public on the proper way to handle nursing in public and those that might complain about it.

“A Tale of Two Nursing Moms” seeks to bring recognition to the need for a federal law that protects a nursing mother's right to feed her baby anywhere that she and her baby would otherwise be allowed to be. We’re urging moms to go to their local Victoria’s Secret on July 1 at 1 pm to nurse their babies and be a part of this important movement.

---

What do you think of nursing in public?

What do you think about Victoria's Secret of all places---who advertises with and profits from women's breasts---giving breastfeeding moms a hard time?

What do you think of nurse-ins as a type of protest/vehicle for change?

Thanks,

Jen
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  #2  
June 29th, 2006, 09:29 AM
chlodoll
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I sight of her breasts could offend a customer??? They are in Victorias Secret!! There is cleavage everywhere!
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  #3  
June 29th, 2006, 09:41 AM
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haha I agree! I only read the first paragraph. We dont really have that problem where I live. Its legal for women to take off thier shirts and walk around in public. It is an accepted thing in my city. I dont see why ppl would get so offended by BF in public. I also dont see why a nursing mther should have to go to the bathroom, I wouldnt ask that person to go eat in the bathroom, why should her child. People sound very ignorant in some places in this world.
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  #4  
June 29th, 2006, 10:15 AM
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I think alot of it is about generations. Most younger people won't care. Let alot of the older generations find it rude.
I remember having a woman confront me in my DOCTORS office about breastfeed and modestly. I had a brand new babe and was having a hard time latching and was still getting the hang of it.

The older genereations are taught to put their boobs away, cover them up and bring them out in the comfort of your home.

My feelings on the matter.. If a mother can feed her baby descreatly she should in public as cortesy.

Now I liked breastfeeding in change room but some do have "no food or drink rules" Despite how wonderful it is to use a change room breastmilk is food.
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  #5  
June 29th, 2006, 10:47 AM
CBMS
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I think people will be able to tell by my blinkie how I feel about this one.

I think it's absolutely insane that a store that "materializes" almost naked women on their commercials would have a problem with... dundundun... a BOOB... being partially shown in their store. Give me a break.

It's quite possibly the dumbest thing I've ever heard, actually.


As far as the OP talking about the older/younger generations... I feel the oposite as you...

my in laws are wonderful about my bf, and don't get embarassed or upset about my bf in public when I'm with them (they're both 78). The only time I've had any kind of reaction this time was from a young woman--my age or a bit younger. She threw a fit because I was bf Madeline in the waiting room at the dentists' office. She and I were the only ones there, and she got up all huffy after I got Maddie discreetly latched, and said, "oh, you've got to f'ing me kidding me." She went outside. Good thing she didn't actually have the nerve to SAY anything to ME... because there could have been a knock down drag out fight over it right there.

Anyway... I digress... I have a bunch of older friends (I used to be a waitress, so some of my best, dearest friends in the world are over 60 and used to be my regular customers ), and all of them asked if I'd be breastfeeding, and have been very encouraging. I tend to think that it's the younger generation that clings to the formula research and the idea that it's just as good that think that NIP is icky. But that's just my view of things. My interpretation of it all. Not that I like it, but oh well...

My opinion is that if there is someone in public that doesn't want to see my breast as I am feeding my child... that they should put a blanket over THEIR head in shame. I don't have a gun. I'm not making them stare.
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  #6  
June 29th, 2006, 11:09 AM
Sunflower_Mommy2003's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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Speaking of blinkies...







Jen
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  #7  
June 29th, 2006, 11:14 AM
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Can I steal it?
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  #8  
June 29th, 2006, 11:18 AM
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Can I steal it? [/b]
Of course!

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  #9  
June 29th, 2006, 11:37 AM
kadydid
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I am at a loss for words it's kind of like saying its offensive to see muscles in a gym. I can tell you that I buy a lot of stuff from them, so I get a catalog about every other day and I know for a fact that they show more than a nursing mother.
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  #11  
June 29th, 2006, 11:54 AM
Sunflower_Mommy2003's Avatar Mega Super Mommy
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ITA, I've often joked that even without a blanket I show less breast than the average teen girl at the mall...and certainly less than you see on Victoria Secret manaquins or in their ads.

Jen
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  #12  
June 29th, 2006, 12:14 PM
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OMG! I think that is outrageous! Nursing mothers have a right to nurse in public, let alone a store where breasts are the main focus!
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  #13  
June 29th, 2006, 12:41 PM
kadydid
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Can you imagine a customer in VS complaining that they just seen some breasts?? (from a nursing mom)
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  #14  
June 29th, 2006, 12:48 PM
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Personally I feel that these woman are looking for an agruement. I mean SERIOUSLY,if I took my son into the changing room and BOTTLE FED him,I would be asked to do it elsewhere...the changing room is MEANT for customers trying on clothing...not feeding or diapering your child! The restroom in the malls around here are awesome...a whole family restroom,with lounge chairs,rocking chairs,private rooms if you choose,and tv's! I personally dont care where someone feeds their child,or how they feed their child...however I think this whole thing was blown out of proportion.
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  #15  
June 29th, 2006, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Personally I feel that these woman are looking for an agruement. I mean SERIOUSLY,if I took my son into the changing room and BOTTLE FED him,I would be asked to do it elsewhere...the changing room is MEANT for customers trying on clothing...not feeding or diapering your child! The restroom in the malls around here are awesome...a whole family restroom,with lounge chairs,rocking chairs,private rooms if you choose,and tv's! I personally dont care where someone feeds their child,or how they feed their child...however I think this whole thing was blown out of proportion.[/b]
You would never be asked to bottle feed your child in a restroom to begin with. Furthermore, not only does VS have a company policy to ALLOW mothers to BF in the changing rooms, but most states have LAWS protecting our right to BF our children wherever we want!
People don't want women to BF in public, they want us to be discrete...yet when a woman seeks a private changing room to do so in then she is in the wrong as well. I suppose I should just not leave my home or let my child starve if I need to wander out in the public.
If they were looking for a fight I would imagine it would have happened right then and there. These women left the stores after they were denied the oppurtunity to feed their children. It is incredibly upsetting to be looked down upon or have your intentions and motives questioned for choosing the best. Her intentions were not to "look for an arguement", her intention was to feed her baby!
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  #16  
June 29th, 2006, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Quote:
Personally I feel that these woman are looking for an agruement. I mean SERIOUSLY,if I took my son into the changing room and BOTTLE FED him,I would be asked to do it elsewhere...the changing room is MEANT for customers trying on clothing...not feeding or diapering your child! The restroom in the malls around here are awesome...a whole family restroom,with lounge chairs,rocking chairs,private rooms if you choose,and tv's! I personally dont care where someone feeds their child,or how they feed their child...however I think this whole thing was blown out of proportion.[/b]
You would never be asked to bottle feed your child in a restroom to begin with. Furthermore, not only does VS have a company policy to ALLOW mothers to BF in the changing rooms, but most states have LAWS protecting our right to BF our children wherever we want!
People don't want women to BF in public, they want us to be discrete...yet when a woman seeks a private changing room to do so in then she is in the wrong as well. I suppose I should just not leave my home or let my child starve if I need to wander out in the public.
If they were looking for a fight I would imagine it would have happened right then and there. These women left the stores after they were denied the oppurtunity to feed their children. It is incredibly upsetting to be looked down upon or have your intentions and motives questioned for choosing the best. Her intentions were not to "look for an arguement", her intention was to feed her baby!
[/b]
Yes,I understand they only are wanting to feed their child...thats fine...point taken. However,I just dont see the point in going into a changing room to do so...And honestly how would you know if I would or wouldnt be asked to leave the changing room to feed a bottle fed child? People are weird,so never say never! Just as restrooms are meant for customers,so are changing rooms....if they arent trying on clothing they dont need to be inside of a changingroom!!!!!!!!!!
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  #18  
June 29th, 2006, 01:12 PM
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...And honestly how would you know if I would or wouldnt be asked to leave the changing room to feed a bottle fed child? People are weird,so never say never! Just as restrooms are meant for customers,so are changing rooms....if they arent trying on clothing they dont need to be inside of a changingroom!!!!!!!!!![/b]
No one would ever ask a woman bottle feeding to go somewhere private, you wouldn't need to go to a changing room and subsequently would not be asked to go to the restroom.
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  #19  
June 29th, 2006, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Personally I feel that these woman are looking for an agruement. I mean SERIOUSLY,if I took my son into the changing room and BOTTLE FED him,I would be asked to do it elsewhere...the changing room is MEANT for customers trying on clothing...not feeding or diapering your child! The restroom in the malls around here are awesome...a whole family restroom,with lounge chairs,rocking chairs,private rooms if you choose,and tv's! I personally dont care where someone feeds their child,or how they feed their child...however I think this whole thing was blown out of proportion.[/b]
I don't think they're looking for an argument, just demanding the same rights as bottlefeeders---to feed their children wherever they and their children are allowed to be, without harassment.

I wouldn't compare nursing to diaper changing, which can produce an extremely offensive odor and may leave behind feces residue which would certainly be a valid health concern for other patrons. Speaking of feces residue...one of these women was actually directed to feed her baby in a public restroom. No bottlefeeder would ever be asked to do that. I wouldn't eat my lunch around the sounds and smells of strangers urinating and defecating, and I certainly wouldn't feed my child in that enviroment.

The 'family restroom' at our mall has one rocking chair and some toys; the changing table is in the same room. There's an open doorway leading out to the area where everyone has to walk past to get to the regular bathrooms and public phones. Also, if you're dealing with a fussy, hungry baby you have to walk through a LOT of mall to get there. Why should a baby have to scream and cry for 5-10 minutes while she makes her way to a public restroom where no adult would voluntarily consume a meal?

These women *were* customers, and Victoria Secret already has a policy allowing nursing in it's stores-and yes-changing rooms. These employees were not only insufficiently aware of their own companies policies, but they were downright rude to these nursing mothers, their patrons.

The nursing moms in question weren't looking for an argument, as StacyC said, they were customers that wanted to feed their hungry, weeping babies in peace. The nerve, eh?

I think they should both be commended for standing up for their own rights and the rights of other nursing mothers.

Jen
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  #20  
June 29th, 2006, 04:27 PM
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Yes,I understand they only are wanting to feed their child...thats fine...point taken. However,I just dont see the point in going into a changing room to do so...And honestly how would you know if I would or wouldnt be asked to leave the changing room to feed a bottle fed child? People are weird,so never say never! Just as restrooms are meant for customers,so are changing rooms....if they arent trying on clothing they dont need to be inside of a changingroom!!!!!!!!!![/b]

she wanted to use the changing room cause her daughter is at the age when she is interested in everything so her babe would be popping off everytime someone walked by. Sounds completely reasonable to me.


so what do you think about the other woman? the one who was just walking through the store nursing?
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