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white poppies


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  #2  
November 8th, 2006, 09:17 AM
mrobinson
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Posts: n/a
Quote:
Is the white poppy disgraceful as some vetrans has said? What are your thoughts on the white poppy?

http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/content/news_syn...tepoppies.shtml[/b]
It's a total infringment on vetrans.. unless every cent collected went to the vets, I couldn't support it.. ((now off to read what you posted.

“The red poppy doesn't promote war in any way. It's red for blood and has a black centre for grief.


Dunkirk veteran Bernard Sharp, said: “The red poppy is a symbol of help and to remember those who've died. I lost and lots of friends in the war. Nobody wants war but we have to respect those who died. I don't recognise the white poppy.”

((feeling a bit better))

Editted.. I have no right to tell a legion member about why we wear poppies.
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  #3  
November 8th, 2006, 09:32 AM
mrobinson
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In 1933 the Co-operative Women's Guild produced the first white poppies to be worn on Armistice Day (later called Remembrance Day). The Guild stressed that the white poppy was not intended as an insult to those who died in the First World War - a war in which many of the women lost husbands, brothers, sons and lovers.

The White Poppy symbolises the belief that there are better ways to resolve conflicts than killing strangers – it is now produced and distributed by the Peace Pledge Union (PPU).

The work of the PPU is primarily educational, drawing attention to social values and habits which make continuing violence a likely outcome. 85 years after the end of the ‘war to end all war’ we still have a long way to go to put an end to a social institution which in the last decade alone killed over 10 million children.
http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Un...photo272748.htm

http://www.ppu.org.uk/learn/early/po...rly_years.html
(this is a must read)

<div align="center">We cherish too, the Poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led,
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies </div>

She then adopted the custom of wearing a red poppy in memory of the sacrifices of war and also as a symbol of keeping the faith.

A French women, Madam Guerin, visiting the United States, learned of the custom and took it one step further. When she returned to France she decided to hand make the red poppies and sell them to raise money for the benefit of the orphaned and destitute women and children in war torn areas of France. This tradition spread to Canada, The United States and Australia and is still followed today. The money collected from the sale of poppies goes to fund various veterans programs.
source

Long before the Great War, the red poppy had become a symbol of death, renewal and life. The seeds of the flower can remain dormant in the earth for years, but will blossom spectacularly when the soil is churned. Beginning in late 1914, the fields of Northern France and Flanders became the scene of stupendous disturbances. Red Poppys soon appeared.

In 1915, at a Canadian dressing station north of Ypres on the Essex Farm, an exhausted physician named Lt. Col. John McCrae would take in the view of the poppy strewn Salient and experience a moment of artistic inspiration. The veteran of the South African War was able to distill in a single vision the vitality of the red poppy symbol, his respect for the sacrifice made by his patients and dead comrades, and his intense feeling of obligation to them. McCrae would capture all of this in the most famous single poem of the First World War, In Flander's Field.
http://www.worldwar1.com/heritage/rpoppy.htm

White poppy
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  #4  
November 9th, 2006, 05:33 PM
beck12's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 12,330
I guess I would say as long as the white poppies were not represented as being in financial support of veterans & it was clearly stated their intent & where the funds go - I don't see it as a big controversy...although I have never seen white poppies for sale (and don't imagine I will - at least for a VERY long time) & I always buy the red ones when I see them. I am a pacifist at heart - so I like that the white poppies reflect that - and at the same time I still have a ton of respect for veterans (like my dad, grandfather, etc) and what they have been willing to sacrifice.
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