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What else should hospitals offer to laboring moms?


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  #1  
June 8th, 2007, 12:02 PM
Mega Super Mommy
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Posts: 2,780
What would you like to see more hospitals offer to moms in labor?

Such as- waterbirthing tubs, a couch for SO to sleep on, etc. Anything else you can think of that you would like to see more of in hospitals?
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  #2  
June 8th, 2007, 01:10 PM
thepinkleprechaun's Avatar Platinum Supermommy
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 10,988
Um, uh....how about some darn FOOOOOD!!!

I wasn't allowed to have food after midnight the day I was induced, and I was in labor for about 10 hours but by the time I was pushing I had like NO energy. Good thing she basically came out on her own. Ugh that sucked. Hopefully next time I don't have complications and I can go to a birth center.

Oh, and I would love to see hospitals offering water births also! I think that is such a cool thing.
My room was like a hotel suite, complete with pull out chair/bed thing for Dh.
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  #3  
June 8th, 2007, 01:17 PM
jhmomofmany's Avatar Look! A Dancing Banana!
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Hormonal rant... never mind.
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  #4  
June 8th, 2007, 01:23 PM
quietsong's Avatar Just Another Slacker Mom
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Missouri
Posts: 42,367
Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.

As for the rest... I don't know. The hospital I birthed in had everything I could imagine and then some available. There was a fold out couch for DH, I was asked if I wanted a room with a birthing tub before they got me situated, I had all sorts of things to help my labor (birthing ball, etc), they gave me full cable with a DVD player, a CD player and a CD of soothing classical music... I was amazed.
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  #5  
June 8th, 2007, 01:40 PM
*Aspen*
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i was eating a cheeseburger, some fries and chips among other things in labor...LOL!!
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  #6  
June 8th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Ms.Michelle
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I called my hospital yesterday and was pretty disappointed.
~ respect. (If a birthing plan is presented, why discount it? If a woman doesn't want something done, don't bloody ask over and over. This can be applied to anything from FF/BF to drugs. I won't get too personal into my experience but that was the first thing I thought ~ there is no respect to my wishes here. I will have to fight every little thing.)
~ tours to see the places. (Right now there are always full so because of overcrowding, and cut backs, my hospital doesn't do tours. Apparently they used too.)
~ waterbirthing tubs. (Right now my hospital "doesn't have the weight allowance on the floor" to support one rented tub. I think they lied to me because my doula, who used to be a nurse on the maternity floor of this hospital, did do waterbirths there. My OB/GYN said he wouldn't even do it because it's not easy for him to monitor me.)
~ birthing stools
~ showers for each birthing mom
~ bars
~ birthing balls
~ the ability to move (Being strapped down with machines is unnecessary.)
~ Midwives & doulas (Midwives and doulas care about the whole birthing family instead of seeing a birthing mom as a science experiment with conditions to control. Many women feel bullied in the most vulernable time in their life and when a life is coming into this world. There needs to be a change in mentality that hospitals/nurses/OB/Gyn's forget ~ this is supposed to be a spiritual event for a family. That also included the father.)
~ Coverage for midwives (*Obviously not to apply in the US.* In the province I live in, health care doesn't pay for them so if I had $3500 I could get one.)
~ better classes for pregnant couples (Right now, the ones that are available are really watered down because each hospital has insurance policies that dictate how this or that isn't as controlled, bla, bla, blah! If people were given better tools, they would be able to cope better. Right now the emphasis is about the what can go wrong senerios instead of 95% of labours will go smooth if we do this and that. People need to see more videos of natural births, not just the medical ones or the natural screaming banshee that wasn't given any tools. If we taught more about the importance of comfort, women could see how to manage their energy. Also, if managed effictively, women can sleep in between contractions but they aren't given any tools on how.)
~ Food and drink. (Energy. When women's energy levels go down, the blood pressure of baby and mother is effected and the doctor's interpret it as stress. Well it is stress but the solution is food, not drugs and c-sections.)
~ babies to stay in the room. (Many hospitals still wisk baby away from the mom to cut the cord, wash it, weight it, do the APGAR tests, etc. when a baby SHOULD be touched and with it's mom for at least the first hour.
~ delayed cord cutting. (Many hospitals still cut a cord immediately when it's actually better for mom and baby for that to stay attached until it (at least) quits pumping. It helps the baby slowly adjust to the new outside and it helps mom deliver the placenta if the baby is allowed to be held by mom. It takes a baby around an hour to start stimulating the nipple and that releases hormones in both mom and baby that helps everyone.)

*will add as I think of more ~ I have to go back to work!
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  #7  
June 8th, 2007, 02:00 PM
*Aspen*
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Oh Michelle, that looks a lot like my birth plan....LOL!!
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  #8  
June 8th, 2007, 02:01 PM
Tofu Bacon
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ITA about the food. Is there any better way of letting us know that they see us as prospective surgical patients than by starving us "just in case"
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  #9  
June 8th, 2007, 02:23 PM
Mega Super Mommy
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,780
Quote:
I called my hospital yesterday and was pretty disappointed.
~ respect. (If a birthing plan is presented, why discount it? If a woman doesn't want something done, don't bloody ask over and over. This can be applied to anything from FF/BF to drugs. I won't get too personal into my experience but that was the first thing I thought ~ there is no respect to my wishes here. I will have to fight every little thing.)
~ tours to see the places. (Right now there are always full so because of overcrowding, and cut backs, my hospital doesn't do tours. Apparently they used too.)

~ babies to stay in the room. (Many hospitals still wisk baby away from the mom to cut the cord, wash it, weight it, do the APGAR tests, etc. when a baby SHOULD be touched and with it's mom for at least the first hour.

*will add as I think of more ~ I have to go back to work! [/b]
I completely agree with these.

Especially the respect one.

Some of the hospitals people on this site have described sound just awful. Mine was a very small hospital so I got a tour, my birth plan was honored, and my baby stayed with me the vast majority of the time I was there.
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  #10  
June 8th, 2007, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.[/b]
It is dangerous to eat while in labor. Why is food so important to so many of you(not directed at you, but everyone who mentioned food in this thread)? It's mainly for comfort and energy.. But should you need surgery--which is a very real possibility and can be for very valid reasons(say you hemorrhage and getting the baby out immediately will save your life), you can vomit, aspirate and DIE while on the operating table.

Which is really the lesser of the two evils here? Not eating for a day isn't nearly as dangerous as aspiration.
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  #11  
June 8th, 2007, 02:43 PM
Ms.Michelle
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Quote:
Quote:
Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.[/b]
It is dangerous to eat while in labor. Why is food so important to so many of you(not directed at you, but everyone who mentioned food in this thread)? It's mainly for comfort and energy.. But should you need surgery--which is a very real possibility and can be for very valid reasons(say you hemorrhage and getting the baby out immediately will save your life), you can vomit, aspirate and DIE while on the operating table.

Which is really the lesser of the two evils here? Not eating for a day isn't nearly as dangerous as aspiration.
[/b]
This is why we have so many medical interventions. Why can't labour be seen as normal in 95% of the cases?
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  #12  
June 8th, 2007, 02:45 PM
asianmama
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FOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
with my son- my water broke befor i could eat breakfast. i took a peanut butter cookie when i ran out the door to head to the hospital.-- that was the only thing i ate in 26 hours... they wouldnt give me lunch,snack dinner or dessert til alex was 3 hours old.. also they "forgot" i was in a room and didnt have the hospital staff come with menus or anything... i kept pushing the call button and no one responded for over 30 minutes. --hubby actually had to stand out of the room and get the nurses attention-- glad i wasnt dying or anything lol
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  #13  
June 8th, 2007, 02:52 PM
*Aspen*
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Quote:
Quote:
Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.[/b]
It is dangerous to eat while in labor. Why is food so important to so many of you(not directed at you, but everyone who mentioned food in this thread)? It's mainly for comfort and energy.. But should you need surgery--which is a very real possibility and can be for very valid reasons(say you hemorrhage and getting the baby out immediately will save your life), you can vomit, aspirate and DIE while on the operating table.

Which is really the lesser of the two evils here? Not eating for a day isn't nearly as dangerous as aspiration.
[/b]
here is your answer... and i don't know about you, but energy is pretty important in labor

nak

Quote:
Women who are given IVs are often not allowed to eat or drink and are told teh IV will replace the food and water they may need in labor. But the denial of food and water can make a woman's contractions weak and ineffectual in a long labor. Her ability to work with pushing contractions may be affected if she has gone eighteen to twenty hours without anything to eat.

Glucose is often dripped in for energy. Many natural childbirth mothers prefer to suck on oranges or drink fruit juices, but simple solutions are not the approach taken in most hospitals. Almost every woman in labor is now told she is dehydrated and hooked up to an IV when she arrives at the hospital. A little test is done on her urine, after which, with absolute authority, she is told this is so. Or she may be told it is necessary to have an open vein in case of bleeding that requires a transfusion. (Not only is this rare, but an IV can be hooked up at that time if needed).

When almost every woman in labor is declared to be dehydrated, we should begin to be suspicious. There is an important process going on here that we don't know much about. We don't know enough about what constitutes as "normal" for the laboring mother to start instituting corrective measures, en masse, for all laboring women. As one doctor pointed out, the normally low concentrations of serum glucose in the human fetus may contribute to its capacity to withstand asphyxia. This suggests that if, for any reason, there is a temporary reduction of oxygen to the baby's brain, the baby can survive that condition better when the mother's serum glucose level is low.
-----So here we are, doing our misguided best to raise the woman's serum glucose level by hooking her up to an IV and dripping the stuff directly into her vein.

Natural Childbirth--The Bradley Way (Susan McCutcheon)

Fasting during labor does not guarantee an empty stomach.
Aspiration only occurs with general anestesia which is rarely used for the cesarean.
Prolonged fasting increases the amount of hydrochloric acid in the stomach, increasing complications with aspiration.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE
Quote:
This medical myth continues to deprive hundreds of thousands of laboring women in this country of the nourishment their bodies need. The truth is that aspiration itself is extremely rare, and when it does occur it very seldom causes death. Mendelson's original 1946 article reported several cases of aspiration and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia, but no deaths. The cumulative results of more recent studies show that aspiration, far from being the leading cause of maternal death, is a minor and rare cause, accounting at the most for 2% of maternal deaths[/b]
Quote:
Ironically, insisting that women fast during labor may actually, should they inhale their vomitus, increase their risk of pulmonary edema, because the gastric juices left in the stomach after hours of fasting are far more acidic than usual; highly acidic fluids in the lungs are more toxic to lung tissue.[/b]
http://www.birthingnaturally.net/barp/fasting.html
[/b][/quote]
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  #14  
June 8th, 2007, 02:57 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,429
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.[/b]
It is dangerous to eat while in labor. Why is food so important to so many of you(not directed at you, but everyone who mentioned food in this thread)? It's mainly for comfort and energy.. But should you need surgery--which is a very real possibility and can be for very valid reasons(say you hemorrhage and getting the baby out immediately will save your life), you can vomit, aspirate and DIE while on the operating table.

Which is really the lesser of the two evils here? Not eating for a day isn't nearly as dangerous as aspiration.
[/b]
This is why we have so many medical interventions. Why can't labour be seen as normal in 95% of the cases?
[/b]
Because in those 5% of cases, something can and will go terribly wrong. You don't know who those people will be, and if you don't take precautions with everyone--the end situation can be dire.

Quote:
[/b]
Yes, energy is important in labor--not as important as your life, but yes-important. The fluids you are given during labor help with the fatique as they replace electrolytes and so on. I can't take your link seriously because it is from a natural birthing website. The majority of the medical community believes it to be dangerous to eat while in labor, that counts for something.
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  #15  
June 8th, 2007, 02:59 PM
*Aspen*
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It's nothing about being dangerous. It's about protecting the poor Dr.'s pocketbooks.
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  #16  
June 8th, 2007, 03:02 PM
Ms.Michelle
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Quote:
It's nothing about being dangerous. It's about protecting the poor Dr.'s pocketbooks.[/b]
yes and hospital policy.
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  #17  
June 8th, 2007, 03:02 PM
irishxrose
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Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(quietsong @ Jun 8 2007, 02:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
<div class='quotemain'>Haha. ITA about the food. To me, if a mother is still at 2-3 cm, refusing food is craziness.[/b]
It is dangerous to eat while in labor. Why is food so important to so many of you(not directed at you, but everyone who mentioned food in this thread)? It's mainly for comfort and energy.. But should you need surgery--which is a very real possibility and can be for very valid reasons(say you hemorrhage and getting the baby out immediately will save your life), you can vomit, aspirate and DIE while on the operating table.

Which is really the lesser of the two evils here? Not eating for a day isn't nearly as dangerous as aspiration.
[/b]
This is why we have so many medical interventions. Why can't labour be seen as normal in 95% of the cases?
[/b][/quote]
Because in those 5% of cases, something can and will go terribly wrong. You don't know who those people will be, and if you don't take precautions with everyone--the end situation can be dire.

Quote:
[/b]
Yes, energy is important in labor--not as important as your life, but yes-important. The fluids you are given during labor help with the fatique as they replace electrolytes and so on. I can't take your link seriously because it is from a natural birthing website. The majority of the medical community believes it to be dangerous to eat while in labor, that counts for something.[/b][/quote]

Energy is VERY important. I was not given food or water, and I had a 31 hour labor. It was the most horrendous thing I have ever gone through. They let me get dehydrated and starved. HOW does being dehydrated and starved help a labor along? IT DOESN'T.

And THAT is why I will be having a midwife and will be giving birth at home for the next child we have.
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  #18  
June 8th, 2007, 03:02 PM
*Aspen*
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I can't take your link seriously because it is from a natural birthing website.[/b]
EXACTLY!!!! Because labor isn't natural it's MEDICAL!!!!
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  #19  
June 8th, 2007, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Energy is VERY important. I was not given food or water, and I had a 31 hour labor. It was the most horrendous thing I have ever gone through. They let me get dehydrated and starved. HOW does being dehydrated and starved help a labor along? IT DOESN'T.

And THAT is why I will be having a midwife and will be giving birth at home for the next child we have.[/b]
They should not have allowed you to get dehydrated. Were you given ice chips? Being thirsty and hungry does not help a labor along, but it is far safer than the risk for aspiration.

Quote:
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE
Quote:
I can't take your link seriously because it is from a natural birthing website.[/b]
EXACTLY!!!! Because labor isn't natural it's MEDICAL!!!!
[/b][/quote]
Labor is a natural occurence, but medical personel act to ease the pain of a person, prevent possible complications and so on. That's your stance, and I have mine---people are going to view birth differently and should choose their medical care accordingly.
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  #20  
June 8th, 2007, 03:17 PM
*Aspen*
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OMG Ok, sorry...I just had to get that out of my system. I'm good now.
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